» » Eternally Eve: Images of Eve in the Hebrew Bible, Midrash, and Modern Jewish Poetry (HBI Series on Jewish Women)
Download Eternally Eve: Images of Eve in the Hebrew Bible, Midrash, and Modern Jewish Poetry (HBI Series on Jewish Women) epub book
ISBN:1584655739
Author: Anne Lapidus Lerner
ISBN13: 978-1584655732
Title: Eternally Eve: Images of Eve in the Hebrew Bible, Midrash, and Modern Jewish Poetry (HBI Series on Jewish Women)
Format: rtf docx lrf lit
ePUB size: 1993 kb
FB2 size: 1477 kb
DJVU size: 1853 kb
Language: English
Category: Bible Study and Reference
Publisher: Brandeis University Press; 1 edition (September 28, 2007)
Pages: 256

Eternally Eve: Images of Eve in the Hebrew Bible, Midrash, and Modern Jewish Poetry (HBI Series on Jewish Women) by Anne Lapidus Lerner



Eternally Eve: Images o. .has been added to your Cart. Rarely have I had the experience of putting down a book of this kind with such a sense of satisfaction.

free Fostering Faith: Teaching & Learning in the Christian Church e-book. free The Church Of Scotland: A Sketch Of Its History epub free download free Eternally Eve: Images of Eve in the Hebrew Bible, Midrash, and Modern Jewish Poetry (Brandeis Series on Jewish Women) fb2.

Online Stores ▾. Audible Barnes & Noble Walmart eBooks Apple Books Google Play Abebooks Book Depository Indigo Alibris Better World Books IndieBound.

Eternally Eve is not an exhaustive history of images of Eve through the ages but an organized set of feminist readings and intertextual explorations of carefully selected works. English, Hebrew, and Yiddish; her analyses are nuanced and often persua-sive. The book fulfills its own stated feminist goals-indeed the author’s skills at times seem to exceed the demands of this kind of feminist rubric. Regardless, the literary analyses stand on their own and together serve as a provocative but sensible guide and annotator of Jewish texts in a variety of periods. The story of Eve eating a fruit from the tree of good and evil and the story of her creation are the central biblical texts in which Eve appears, in-spiring a wealth of literary and visual art.

For both Judaism and Christianity, these stories involving Eve have for centuries been entangled with the religious and social construction of gender.

Lerner’s task is, at first glance, the more daunting for no figure in Western culture, including Adam, seems as overdetermined as Eve. Yet Linett’s subject is also challenging: of the four words in her book’s title, the only one not subject to critical controversy is and. Spanning religion and literature, Eternally Eve will appeal to a broad readership. Those well-educated in Jewish religious texts will be familiar with the biblical and at least some of the talmudic and midrashic passages that Lerner cites. Readers acquainted with Phyllis Trible’s and Daniel Boyarin’s works on re-visioning biblical and rabbinic intepretation will be prepared for Lerner’s questioning of time-worn assumptions. 1 However, the rabbinic texts and modern analyses are likely to be new and probably illuminating to everyone else.

Books in the HBI Series on Jewish Women are appropriate for course adoption in Jewish studies, women’s studies, gender studies, history, religion and many other fields of study. Below, is a list of some of our publications in the Series. National Jewish Book Award Finalist!

Feb 20, 2019- In Judaism, the Midrash (Hebrew: מדרש‎; plural midrashim) is the body of homiletic stories told by Jewish rabbinic sages to explain passages in the Tanakh. Midrash is a method of interpreting biblical stories that goes beyond simple distillation of religious, legal, or moral teachings. It fills in gaps left in the biblical narrative regarding events and personalities that are only hinted at. It contains both halakah and haggadah, revealing the divine presence of the eternal Torah in the text.

Lerner argues that Eve has been the prism through which Western society has viewed women and thus determined their roles and rights. She brings her background as a scholar of comparative literature, a Conservative Jew, and a feminist to the study of these texts, looking for ways in which to reassess long-held beliefs about what the texts in fact say about Eve and thus all women. The author’s combination of the work of such poets as Linda Pastan, Itzik Manger, and Kim Chernin with rabbinic material presents a refreshingly creative way to study biblical text

Feminism Encounters Traditional Judaism: Resistance and Accommodation by Tova Hartman. Promised Lands: New Jewish American Fiction on Longing and Belonging (Brandeis Series in American Jewish History, Culture and Life & HBI Series on Jewish Women) by Derek Rubin. Sephardi Family Life in the Early Modern Diaspora (HBI Series on Jewish Women) by Julia R. Lieberman. Sexual Violence against Jewish Women during the Holocaust (HBI Series on Jewish Women) by Sonja M. Hedgepeth.

The biblical accounts of Eve's life are central to Western culture, occupying a privileged place in our literature and art, culture, and society. For both Judaism and Christianity, these stories involving Eve have for centuries been entangled with the religious and social construction of gender. The ambiguous biblical record of her life from the two versions of her creation, through her encounter with the forbidden fruit, to her expulsion from Eden, and followed by the tantalizing glimpses of her life in the real world has served through the ages as a mirror of commonly held views about women. For Jewish readers, Eve's role as metonym -- signifying womanhood, or Jewish womanhood, as a whole -- is of prime importance. By tracing the imagined character of Eve from ancient times to the present, Eternally Eve opens a window on the transmission and persistence of cultural and social values. Eternally Eve takes as its subject the many ways these stories can be read, interpreting the biblical narratives as well as their iteration by rabbinic midrashists and modern poets. Anne Lapidus Lerner argues that we must set aside, or at least rethink, a series of assumptions about Eve that have been dominant in Jewish thought for centuries and instead return to the original texts to rediscover meanings implicit in them. Using modern poetry about Eve as a touchstone for reinterpreting older texts, Lerner discovers that Genesis is often more open to contemporary values than are later rabbinic texts. Linking sacred texts to works of the classical and modern imagination, Lerner restores to her sources meanings suppressed or neglected over many years and demonstrates their power to speak today.
Reviews: 3
AGAD
The book is well-written, thoughtful, and excellent. It is not for the casual reader, but for one who wants to have a mind-stretching experience. Philosophy, politics, sociology, religion all in one book. Brilliant!
Pumpit
A wonderful analysis of the Biblical account of the first woman's life, including midrash and modern poetry dealing with Eve, much of which was new to me.
Bine
My teacher Rabbi Neil Gillman, JTS professor and adult education superstar, has written this about Eternally Eve, and with his permission I post his words here. Everyone I know who has read this book has loved it! If you're interested in women in the Bible, midrash, modern Jewish poetry, feminism, literature, Eve...you'll want to own this book.

From Neil Gillman:

----

Read Anne Lapidus Lerner's Eternally Eve.

My first impulse upon finishing reading Dr. Anne Lapidus Lerner's just published Eternally Eve: Images of Eve in the Hebrew Bible, Midrash, and Modern Jewish Poetry, was to search for what was missing. Rarely have I had the experience of putting down a book of this kind with such a sense of satisfaction. Something must be wrong here. My intuitive skepticism thoroughly aroused, I picked the book up again, and began at the back of the book.

A Subject Index? There it was. Eight pages worth. Index of Sources? Six pages. Works Cited? Also eight pages. Footnotes? Over forty pages appear at the end, listed according to the pages to which they pertain. The book is remarkably accessible. But footnotes, indices and citations alone do not guarantee scholarly accomplishment.

True, the works cited range far and wide. From Genesis Rabbah to Dan Pagis, David Stern, Robert Alter, Yaakov Fikhman, ltzik Manger, Marge Piercy, Hessiod, Yokheved Bat-Miriam, Kim Chernin, and many others, some quite unfamiliar to me at least (Helen Papell?), many in Yiddish and Hebrew (all translated). Brief identifying data and dates provide a context.

But it is the way Lerner knits these sources into what she calls "the conversation" that is so striking. An extended analysis of a Hebrew sonnet by Fikhman on the tension between Eve's love for Adam and the "nocturnal enchantments whispered by the serpent" leads to an equally extended study of a Yiddish poem by Manger where the tempter is the apple tree. In a nine-line poem by Helen Papell, the tree becomes a youthful sapling which mirrors Eve to herself.

These three poems serve as a context for a study of the serpent who, in Lerner's telling, emerges as the most intriguing character of the story after Eve herself, first in the biblical text, then in the midrash, later in poetry.

Throughout, Dr. Lerner's analysis is tight and close; she reads her texts very carefully. Her conclusions are frequently surprising, but utterly convincing. Not the least of her accomplishments was to send me back to reread the original narrative, to that incredible third chapter of Genesis and to note the surprises. The biggest surprise is the personality of Eve herself.

I have frequently preached on the matriarchs as exemplars of biblical femininity, but I had never fully appreciated the many dimensions of this woman as they emerge in the narrative. The Eve of the heart of the story is "articulate," a "risk-taker," "eloquent" and "spirited." "Only God, not Adam, rivals her as character," Lerner concludes.

The exegetical history of the biblical narrative, as Lerner traces it from the midrash to our own day, expands this portrait in multiple and varying ways. But Eve's trajectory moves from power to a gradual decline at the end. At first, she is credited with having given birth to Seth, but in 5:3, it is Adam who begets a son, notably, "in his likeness, after his image." I confess that in my many prior readings of the narrative, that striking detail had escaped me entirely.

Gently hovering over the entire conversation are the issues of gender. Eve's story is our story, totally contemporaneous, sacred literature and therefore prescriptive. She is both exemplar and prototype, and paradigm for the present and the future. As every generation read Eve's story through its own lenses, so should we, and Dr. Lerner's Eternally Eve does that for us.