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ISBN:0801043700
Author: Murray J. Harris
ISBN13: 978-0801043703
Title: Jesus As God: The New Testament Use of Theos in Reference to Jesus
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Language: English
Category: Bible Study and Reference
Publisher: Baker Pub Group (November 1, 1992)
Pages: 379

Jesus As God: The New Testament Use of Theos in Reference to Jesus by Murray J. Harris



His book Jesus as God was possibly one of the most comprehensive, in-depth and scholarly treatment of the New Testament passages attributing deity to Jesus in print. There are a total of sixteen passages in the New Testament have been interpreted at one time or other to attribute deity to Jesus Christ. Harris examined each one in detail. Textual, linguistic, grammatical, contextual, historical, and theological issues were all taken into consideration. Harris' conclusions were that it is certain that John 1:1 and John 20:28 applied the title God to Jesus Christ. Harris believed that it was very probable that Romans 9:5, Titus 2:13, Hebrews 1:8 and 2 Peter 1:1 applied the title God to Jesus and that it was probable that that John 1:18 did as well. Harris believed that it was possible, but not likely that that Acts 20:28, Hebrews 1:9 and 1 John 5:20 called Jesus God.

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Murray Harris has made a valuable contribution to the study of the deity of our Lord, focusing on passages that use the word Theos in relation to Christ. He does detailed exegesis of all the pertinent texts, including an outstanding chapter on the use of Theos in the Septuagint, extrabiblical literature, and the NT. Harris is especially helpful on the anarthrous use (. without a definite article) of Theos in John 1:1. He examines all the options and lists the pros and cons of each. The word Theos occurs 1,315 times in the Greek NT primarily as a title for God the Father. Harris believes that of the 15 possible uses of Theos as a title for Christ only 7 are actually so used. He concludes that Theos is definitely used of Christ in John 1:1, and 20:28, very probably in Rom 9:5, Titus 2:13, Heb 1:8, and 2 Pet 1:1, probably in John 1:18, and possibly, but not likely, in Acts 20:28, Heb 1:9, and 1 John 5:20.

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Jesus as God stands as one of the significant al contributions of the century. With linguistic and exegetical skill befitting his ranking as a leading international scholar, Murray J. Harris discusses the New Testament use of the Greek term theos ( God ) as a Christological title.

New Testament scholar Murray Harris examines all New Testament references to Jesus as God, believing that the titles of Jesus encapsulate the early Christian understanding of the role and status of Jesus, and contending that the title of Theos has not received adequate attention from biblical scholars. This book helps deal with heresies that would deny the deity of Christ, by carefully addressing every occasion the word Theos is used in relation to Jesus.

Murray J. Harris (born 18 August 1939) is professor emeritus of New Testament exegesis and theology at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School in Deerfield, Illinois. He was for a time warden of Tyndale House at Cambridge University He has written the book Slave of Christ in the IVP series New Studies in Biblical Theology which has been well received  . Jesus as God: The New Testament Use of Theos in Reference to Jesus. ISBN 978-0-8010-2195-4. New Studies in Biblical Theology. 8. Downers Grove, IL: IVP Academic.

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Jesus as God stands as one of the significant exegetical-theological contributions of the century. With linguistic and exegetical skill befitting his ranking as a leading international scholar, Murray J. Harris discusses the New Testament us of the Greek term theos ("God") as a christological title.
Reviews: 7
Contancia
Fantastic. Make sure you know some Greek or have a Greek translator. Hands down the best defense of the orthodox doctrine of the deity of Christ that I have read. A must have in every believer's library
Trash Obsession
Very satisfied with purchase.
Elizabeth
I love it. but you need to have a good background in Biblical Greek to understand the book. After all the book is GREAT, informative and valuable.
Tiv
good
Mr_Mix
Here is the work of a true master and expert in New Testament (as well as Classical) Greek. Excellent explanations, very precise and thorough. An example might be one of the famous verses distorted by cultic groups such as Jehovah's Witnesses - John 1:1. Prof Murray goes into meticulous detail about the correct translation and interpretation of this verse from the get-go.
Great, incisive teaching. The book does require some knowledge of Greek, but not at a very deep level, for those who aren't looking to go too deeply. A great book for those, who have studied College/University/Seminary level Greek.
A great resource for those speaking with the cults, teaching doctrine in churches or Home groups or preaching.

Highly recommended.
Dagdage
Murray Harris took his Ph.D. from the University of Manchester and was professor emeritus of New Testament at Trinity Evangelical Divinity School. His book Jesus as God was possibly one of the most comprehensive, in-depth and scholarly treatment of the New Testament passages attributing deity to Jesus in print.

There are a total of sixteen passages in the New Testament have been interpreted at one time or other to attribute deity to Jesus Christ. Harris examined each one in detail. Textual, linguistic, grammatical, contextual, historical, and theological issues were all taken into consideration. Various translations and conjectural emendations were discussed. Even the Hebrew text and Greek Septuagint were analyzed for those passages which alluded to or quoted from the Old Testament. Pro's and con's were listed for each view and Harris? conclusions were given in degrees of probability.

Harris' conclusions were that it is certain that John 1:1 and John 20:28 applied the title God to Jesus Christ. Harris believed that it was very probable that Romans 9:5, Titus 2:13, Hebrews 1:8 and 2 Peter 1:1 applied the title God to Jesus and that it was probable that that John 1:18 did as well. Harris believed that it was possible, but not likely that that Acts 20:28, Hebrews 1:9 and 1 John 5:20 called Jesus God. Harris concluded that it was not at all likely that Matthew 1:23, John 17:3, Galatians 2:20, Ephesians 5:5, Colossians 2:2, 2 Thessalonians 1:12 and 1 Timothy 3:16 applied the title God to Jesus (Harris, 1992 171)

Jesus as God scholarly, well written, and very through in its analysis.
Kegal
Murray Harris has produced a classic, scholarly, objective treatment of this topic. He provides a wealth of information, but primarily focuses on the 16 verses which could seriously be considered to refer to Jesus as God; with a thorough examination of the 9 main verses, examining each in terms of the 1) context, 2) syntax, 3) punctuation, and 4) possible variant reading(s).
Three excellent features, among so many others, include: 1) In many cases, he cites numerous authors of various alternative positions, and offers their arguments and their resulting "translations" of the passage. 2) The book is full of statistical studies (e.g., how many times the articular and anartharus use of theos is used by various biblical authors). 3) He frequently reveals the "characteristic manner" in which a particular biblical author refers to Jesus and God.
Though Harris is extremely fair and objective, I did find his treatment deficient in two basic respects: 1) He concludes that the use of theos to refer to Jesus proves his deity, since it is a term that is primarily ontological in character, and, therefore, is an explicit and unequivocal affirmation that he is God. Yet, Harris has already shown that theos was used, even by the Jews and/or biblical writers themselves, to refer to other humans, angels, exalted patriarchs, etc.! Since the term, when used of these others, never meant they were God, the equivocation of Jesus with God needs demonstration. 2) At one point, Harris frankly acknowledges several texts that seem to drive an ontological wedge between Jesus and God (e.g., those which distinguish Jesus from the one who is God and Father). It should be pointed out, however, that Harris is generally far more careful in his arguments, and the conclusions he draws, than many scholars. This book is a gold mine, and will be a definite classic in its field.