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ISBN:078681859X
Author: Jonathan Stroud
ISBN13: 978-0786818594
Title: The Amulet of Samarkand, Book 1 (Bartimaeus)
Format: rtf mobi lit doc
ePUB size: 1314 kb
FB2 size: 1967 kb
DJVU size: 1422 kb
Language: English
Category: Science Fiction and Fantasy
Publisher: Disney-Hyperion (September 2003)
Pages: 464

The Amulet of Samarkand, Book 1 (Bartimaeus) by Jonathan Stroud



The Amulet of Samarkand book. It is the first book in the Bartimaeus trilogy written by English author Jonathan Stroud. 2003 by Doubleday in the United Kingdom. Characters: Bartimaeus, Arthur Underwood, Martha Underwood, Simon Lovelace, Rupert Devereaux تاریخ نخستین خوانش: روز بیست و ششم ماه فوریه سال 2014 میلادی عنوان: طلسم سمرقند اثر: جاناتان استرود؛ برگردان: محمد The Amulet of Samarkand, Jonathan Stroud The Amulet of Samarkand is a children's novel of alternate history, fantasy and magic. It is the first book in the Bartimaeus trilogy written by English author Jonathan Stroud

Jonathan Stroud The Amulet of Samarkand The Bartimaeus Trilogy, book 1 For Gina Part One 2 1 Bartimaeus The tempe. Author: Stroud Jonathan. DOWNLOAD PDF. Jonathan Stroud. The Amulet of Samarkand The Bartimaeus Trilogy, book 1. For Gina. Part One. 2. 1 Bartimaeus The temperature of the room dropped fast. Ice formed on the curtains and crusted thickly around the lights in the ceiling.

Jonathan Stroud - Bartimaeus 1 - The Amulet of Samarkand. The Amulet of Samarkand. The Bartimaeus Trilogy, book 1. And there was the Amulet of Samarkand. It sat in a small case all of its own, protected by glass and its own reputation. I walked over to it, flicking through the planes, seeking danger and finding-well, nothing explicit, but on the seventh plane I had the distinct impression that something was stirring.

view Kindle eBook view Audible audiobook. If I had to pick one fantasy series that both adults and children will absolutely love to pieces, Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus series is it. It delighted me to no end! A quick synopsis of book 1: a very young, magically gifted boy named Nathaniel has been forfeited by his parents to the magician's adoption service in exchange for money and he goes to live with and be the apprentice to Arthur Underwood, a mediocre magician and Minister of Internal Affairs of the British government, who turns out to be a very strict

Jonathan Stroud The Amulet of Samarkand The Bartimaeus Trilogy, book. Stroud, Jonathan - Bartimaeus Trilogy, Book 2 - The Golem. 1 Jonathan Stroud The Golem's Eye The Bartimaeus Trilogy, book 2 For Philippa. Bartimaeus Trilogy, Book 1. 287 Pages·2005·1. I charge you to retrieve the Amulet of Samarkand from the house of Simon. Jonathan Stroud - Bartimaeus 3 - Ptolemy's Gate.

Written by Jonathan Stroud, Audiobook narrated by Simon Jones. But summoning Bartimaeus and controlling him are two different things entirely, and when Nathaniel sends the djinni out to steal Lovelace's greatest treasure, the Amulet of Samarkand, he finds himself caught up in a whirlwind of magical espionage, murder and rebellion. Set in a modern-day London spiced with magicians and mystery, The Amulet of Samarkand is an extraordinary, edge-of-your-seat thriller with many unexpected twists

Bartimaeus: The Amulet of Samarkand is a novel which successfully bridges the divide between children’s and adult fiction. The story of an ambitious young demonologist and an ancient and exasperated demon, it is a challenging and sophisticated read for young readers of perhaps 12 years and upwards and a witty entertaining and fast-moving adventure story for adults. Learning that Bartimaeus: The Amulet of Samarkand is the story of a young apprentice magician, cruelly bereft of his parents and lonely and neglected in his foster home, we may feel that we are in over-familiar territory

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Jonathan Stroud is the author of the New York Times best-selling Bartimaeus trilogy, as well as The Leap, The Last Siege, and Buried Fire. He lives in England with his family. Библиографические данные.

Presenting a thrilling new voice in children's literature-a witty, gripping adventure story featuring a boy and his not-so-tame djinni. Nathaniel is a young magician's apprentice, taking his first lessons in the arts of magic. But when a devious hotshot wizard named Simon Lovelace ruthlessly humiliates Nathaniel in front of everyone he knows, Nathaniel decides to kick up his education a few notches and show Lovelace who's boss. With revenge on his mind, he masters one of the toughest spells of all: summoning the all-powerful djinni, Bartimaeus. But summoning Bartimaeus and controlling him are two different things entirely, and when Nathaniel sends the djinni out to steal the powerful Amulet of Samarkand, Nathaniel finds himself caught up in a whirlwind of magical espionage, murder, blackmail, and revolt. Set in a modern-day London spiced with magicians and mayhem, this extraordinary, funny, pitch-perfect thriller will dazzle the myriad fans of Artemis Fowl and the His Dark Materials trilogy. And with the rights sold in more than a dozen countries, and a major motion picture in the works, the Bartimaeus trilogy is on the fast track to becoming a classic.
Reviews: 7
Lamranilv
If I had to pick one fantasy series that both adults and children will absolutely love to pieces, Jonathan Stroud's Bartimaeus series is it. It delighted me to no end!

A quick synopsis of book 1: a very young, magically gifted boy named Nathaniel has been forfeited by his parents to the magician's adoption service in exchange for money and he goes to live with and be the apprentice to Arthur Underwood, a mediocre magician and Minister of Internal Affairs of the British government, who turns out to be a very strict, uncaring, cowardly master. Mr. Underwood's wife, Martha, welcomes young Nathaniel with open arms and cares for him greatly, and the feeling is mutual. Little does Mr. Underwood know of the true talent of his young apprentice, and while Nathaniel is barely being taught anything at all by his pompous old master, the brave young boy is devouring the books and learning much on his own.

One day, a group of Mr. Underwood's friends, all powerful magicians and fellow employees of the government, are having a little get-together and Arthur decides to present his young apprentice, "the boy", to everyone. Simon Lovelace, one of the most powerful and arrogant magicians in the group, decides to question the boy about what he has learned, and although Nathaniel obviously displays much natural talent and knowledge of magic (much to his master's and everyone's surprise), Simon Lovelace completely dismisses the boy's talent and tries to make him look like an ignorant little buffoon. Completely angered and embarrassed now, Nathaniel talks back to the powerful magician and in return, he angers Mr. Lovelace so much that the magician does something awful to the boy to humiliate him in front of everyone present. Afterwards, Nathaniel runs up to his room crying and immediately plots his revenge on the evil magician. And this is where everything gets REALLY exciting.

Nathaniel spies on and learns some devious details about Lovelace. Then he furiously reads all the books on magic he can get his hands on, and when he thinks he's ready, he secretly summons up the dangerous spirit Bartimaeus to do help him do his bidding. But Bartimaeus is much more than Nathaniel thinks he his and very difficult to control. And young Nathaniel is far more than what Bartimaeus is expecting, too. Together, these two embark on a hilarious, exciting, and very dangerous adventure while trying to bring about the ultimate downfall of the great magician Simon Lovelace.

The chemistry between the outspoken, determined little boy and the endlessly sarcastic Bartimaeus makes for some of the most fun, enjoyable reading I've done in a very long time. The writing is so clever, witty, and devious that it had me laughing all the way through the book, and it's definitely humor that would appeal to all ages. Very highly recommend to everyone. This is a must-read!

* Update 12/13/2014 - Just finished a back-to-back reading marathon of all four Bartimaeus books (The Amulet of Samarkand, The Golem's Eye, Ptolemy's Gate, and The Ring of Solomon). If you love the first book as much as I did, you will be unable to resist reading them all. Every single book in this series is just as wonderful, hilarious, and engaging as the others. 5 BIG STARS to all four books and crossing my fingers that one of these days I'll get to go on another wild adventure with my favorite naughty spirit, Bartimaeus. LOVE, LOVE, LOVE!
Adoranin
I ordered about 20 books recently and out of the 5 Ive gone through so far, this one is prob my favorite, which was a suprise to me. It was a fun and fast read, and I preferred it over some of the other more well received and reviewed books Ive dove into in recent times.

Everyone will compare young adult fantasy books to a certain kid with a lightning bolt on his forehead and out of all the books Ive read, this one prob comes the closest to Rowlings writting in style and feel.

FYI, some of my favorites books are Frankenstein, Moby Dick, Animal Farm and my favorite author is HP Lovecraft.
Braendo
This is the story of Nathaniel, a young and ambitious magician in training, whose master is mediocre at best and loathes Nathaniel.
Because Nathaniel is impatient and too smart for his own good, he decides to take his training further, without his master's knowledge, and summons Bartimaeus, a djinni from the "Other Place" and that's when the trouble starts.

This is Harry Potter meets Aahz (for those of you familiar with the M.Y.T.H series by Robert Asprin and well, Harry Potter). It sounds like a déjà vu, been-there-read-that kind of story but Stroud came up with a well crafted work that brings a bit of novelty to the genre.

Bartimaeus (or Barty, as I like to call him) is absolutely hilarious. His chapters are written in the first person and he is not sparing with his opinions. He's been around for 5000 years and he's pretty full of himself.
My only complaint is the author's excessive use of footnotes in the Barty chapters. Although most of them are hilarious and worth reading, I feel a lot of them could have easily been incorporated in the text itself, instead of having the reader going back and forth to read them. Especially since I read it on Kindle and it took me a while to get the hang of reading the footnotes and coming back to the text afterwards. But my own dorkiness is hardly the author's fault.

So now, as is always the risk when reading the first book of a series (that I got as a freebie on Amazon), I find myself hooked and in a bit of Barty humor withdrawal syndrome. Guess I'm going to have to shell out the 7$ to get the second book, which I will do gladly :)