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Download The City of Ember: The Graphic Novel epub book
ISBN:0375868216
Author: Dallas Middaugh,Niklas Asker,Jeanne DuPrau
ISBN13: 978-0375868214
Title: The City of Ember: The Graphic Novel
Format: mbr lrf txt docx
ePUB size: 1707 kb
FB2 size: 1573 kb
DJVU size: 1641 kb
Language: English
Category: Science Fiction and Fantasy
Publisher: Random House Books for Young Readers; Reprint edition (September 25, 2012)
Pages: 144

The City of Ember: The Graphic Novel by Dallas Middaugh,Niklas Asker,Jeanne DuPrau



Personal Name: DuPrau, Jeanne. Rubrics: Graphic novels Fantasy. C) 2017-2018 All rights are reserved by their owners. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners

Based on DuPrau's novel (Random, 2003), the story brings the city of Ember to life using many muted yellows and earth tones. DuPrau's well-received dystopian and postapocalyptic middle-grade novel is ably adapted into graphic-novel form by Middaugh and Asker. The result is a streamlined work that moves quickly while retaining the heart of the original story. Readers new and old will appreciate the muted colors of Asker's artwork, which clearly shows the dinginess of Ember and the generic quality of people who have bred past specific races.

DuPrau’s well-received dystopian and postapocalyptic middle-grade novel is ably adapted into graphic-novel form by Middaugh and Asker. Middaugh is not afraid to cut as needed, removing scenes and characters with the hand of a screenwriter. Booklist, October 15, 2012: "The city of Ember, the only light in a vast world of darkness, is dying and two young teens might be the only ones who can find the way out of their darkening town-if they can escape the machinations of a corrupt mayor. The book City of Ember provides good clean fun. It also takes you to the past while connecting with the potential future. The plot takes place underground.

by Jeanne DuPrau & adapted by Dallas Middaugh illustrated by Niklas Asker. Effective use of light and shadow in the art give this graphic adaptation of the 2003 novel a properly spooky look, but it reads overall more like a summary than a developed story. Though sticking to a sketchy iteration of the original’s plot rather than the somewhat altered film version (no cave monster, sorry), the tale is told in a visual, cinematic way with an admixture of quick reaction shots and wordless action sequences that allow readers to race along almost as fast as they can turn the pages.

Jeanne DuPrau and Others. View More by This Author. This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device. In the spring 2003, kids, parents, teachers, librarians-whole ed and fell in love with Jeanne DuPrau's story about a doomed city, and the two children who found a way out. Nearly 10 years later, that story, The City of Ember, is a bona fide classic, with over . million copies sold

The City of Ember book. million copies sold. Now experience Jeanne DuPrau's vision anew as artist Niklas Asker faithfully brings to life the glare of the lamps, the dinginess of the streets, and the brilliance of the first sunrise.

Jeanne DuPrau; Dallas Middaugh; Niklas Asker. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. The City of Ember : The Graphic Novel. Jeanne DuPrau; Dallas Middaugh; Niklas Asker. Book Format: Choose an option.

Jeanne DuPrau adapted by Dallas MiDDaugh art by niklas asker. Now a Graphic Novel! Jeanne DuPraus classic tells the story of the city of Ember, designed as a last refuge for the human race. When the storerooms run out of food and the lights begin to fail, its up to Lina and Doon to decipher the fragments of an ancient parchment and find a way out. D i s co ve r th e be st se l l i n g s e r ie s ! Play the game at booksofember. keep reading for a sneak peek of The City of Ember.

By Jeanne DuPrau Illustrated by Niklas Asker Adapted by Dallas Middaugh. By Jeanne DuPrau Illustrated by Niklas Asker Adapted by Dallas Middaugh. By Jeanne DuPrau and Dallas Middaugh Illustrated by Niklas Asker. Now experience Jeanne DuPrau’s vision anew as artist Niklas Asker faithfully brings to life the glare of the lamps, the dinginess of the streets, and the brilliance of the first sunrise. About The City of Ember. In the spring 2003, kids, parents, teachers, librarians-whole ed and fell in love with Jeanne DuPrau’s story about a doomed city, and the two children who found a way out. Nearly 10 years later, that story, The City of Ember, is a bona fide classic, with.

by Jeanne DuPrau · Dallas Middaugh · Niklas Asker. Nearly 10 years later, that story, The City of Ember, is a. Car Trouble. From the national bestselling author of The City of Ember comes this unforgettable adventure involving a hitchhiker, an aspiring singer with a con-artist mother, a couple of thugs, and a carsick terrier

In the spring 2003, kids, parents, teachers, librarians—whole communities—discovered and fell in love with Jeanne DuPrau's story about a doomed city, and the two children who found a way out. Nearly 10 years later, that story, The City of Ember, is a bona fide classic, with over 1.7 million copies sold. Now experience Jeanne DuPrau's vision anew as artist Niklas Asker faithfully brings to life the glare of the lamps, the dinginess of the streets, and the brilliance of the first sunrise.
Reviews: 7
JoJolar
In our contemporary everyday society communities have play stations, cell phones, iPads, tablets and other electronic gadgets. It seems many environments retain few traditions, such as book reading. Nevertheless, there are still ways to find old fashion entertainment. The book City of Ember provides good clean fun. It also takes you to the past while connecting with the potential future.

The plot takes place underground. Readers discover that a city was built within mother earth's womb, beneath the outer surface of our planet. It was built by “builders.” The builders are central to the premise of creation. It was the builders who constructed Ember City. They did this to protect members of mankind after some kind of catastrophe took place. Catastrophe required mankind to have shelter.

The book includes three principal characters. There is the shy LIna, the child Poppy and the explorative boy Doon. These three individuals are the principal individuals in a community of people in a science fiction city that oscillates around dark and light.

A grandmother provides an education about compassion as readers learn about memory loss within a cherished family. Doon’s father gives his son knowledge about being inquisitive. These positive traits exemplify positive family potential.

There is nearly nonstop mystery. The mystery is correlated with adventure. This is a book which not merely stimulates reading skills in children, it also elicits excitement, in both adult and youthful readerships. Ember City is a positive type of tool that can be passed on from one family member to the next. It teaches about responsibilities, concern for others and the value of exploration. it’s about how to bring light into darkness.

In addition to sections containing moral values and hope, there are aspects about to the vile of evil. This book is not only a teacher, it can kindle a love for reading. It’s a win-win item.

The reader is exposed to children. These kids are in the age bracket of 12. That’s when they are faced with something like a graduation; jobs are being handed down with titles. The reader learns that they will labor at their job classification until old age. Lina and Doon switch job classifications. The girl becomes an messenger. This enables her to extract more news and information than otherwise would be possible. The boy gets to work fixing piping that runs throughout the underground city. The boy is able to explore various underground tunnels and search for salvation.

It is here where readers are also introduced to the mayor of Ember City and his disciples (or cohorts). At first one simply thinks they are typical politicians. Later, it is discovered they hoard and steal precious food. This is completely immoral because the city’s food supply is being reduced. In the meantime, the rest of the citizens are facing the calamity of reductions. The reader is witnessing a potential future society, or at least the give-and-takes within community.

Further, the generator that produces lighting for society is starting to malfunction. As a result, there is a reduction of lighting. Citizens of that unique underground settlement are sporadically left in the dark. It makes a person wonder what can be done. This can also make readers appreciate all of our electrical benefits. Also, it is here that the reader ponders about solving the problem of simple meals.

Moreover, Ember City provides food for thought about what to do when you are left in the dark. You’ll have to read the book to discover the trail of tunnels that lead to the ending. However, can you possibly imagine not knowing that there’s a sun that provides light?

This book demonstrates how people can be afraid, brave and also extraordinarily curious. It provides food for thought about the circumstances of choosing job professions, changing environment and society. In a way Ember City is more than an exciting book that can rekindle a love of reading; it not only provides entertainment and is a fun read, it has popular ratings by both adults and children. It can be a cement for family togetherness, understandings and open communique.
Lemana
What a breathtaking book! The detail is amazing and it completely brought the book to life, the storyline is very creative and inventive. This book is about the adventurous, courageous, and shy Lina, who lives in a small, rubbish, and dirty town, that hasn't seen natural light since... ever. So, Lina is determined to find some sort of light, to help her city, that is run by a selfish mayor, who gets everything to himself. In fact, Lina discovers a small closet in the pipe works while visiting a friend on assignment day, inside that small closet is a lifetime supply of canned goods, that some people have never even had in their town. She finds out that her mayor secretly takes his "break" in that closet to have all the goods to himself, so she wonders... "What if I found out more" so Lina, without thinking twice, tries and finds out more. She searches all over the pipe works for more information, she finds a key, her new friend Doon, and some determination to find out what this key leads to. Is it the key to a new city? Will Lina and Doon find light?
Read this dramatic and climactic book to find out!
Tat
The Books of Ember series was very enjoyable. Easy to read and full of adventure. The first second and fourth books were my favorite, but the third (a prequel to the first and second) wasn't nearly as good. However, at the end of the fourth book, you realize why the third book was necessary. This series is probably appropriate for 4th grade and up. It is also full of good life lessons, like - life isn't easy but you can be happy even if it's hard. It also puts a lot of value on being courageous, resourceful, and loyal. Read it. Read it. Read it.
Coiron
The City of Ember is a rule-bound place, where all the lights go out at 9 each night, everyone rises early for breakfast, and careful recycling is a way of life. Lately, though, the lights have begun flickering. Supplies are shorter each year, and some foods are no longer available.

Until their 12th year, the children of the City of Ember go to school. But at the end of that year, they are assigned the jobs they will do for years after, perhaps to the end of their lives. Lina yearns to be a Messenger, running free in the streets, learning the secrets of the city. Doon wants desperately to be an electrician's assistant or a pipeworker, because he dreams of fixing the ancient, failing generators of the city.

When each receives the assignment the other wants, they switch jobs, and begin a conspiracy that will not end until they learn how to save the entire city. Along the way, they solve an ancient puzzle, defeat the greed and subterfuge of the Mayor and his minions, and discover a much wider world than either had ever dreamed existed.

When I read children's literature, I look for more than a tale well told. Juvenile science fiction is not hard to come by, especially today in the age of Harry Potter. But fiction that lauds heroism (particularly the kind of courage which every child will have an opportunity to demonstrate), extolls the value of friendship, and shows when adult precepts and rules are worthwhile, and how to tell when they are not - that is uncommon. (Those qualities form the foundation of the Harry Potter stories, too, and explain the widespread appeal of the boy wizard and his friends.)

The City of Ember has that same appeal. Doon and Lina are courageous; they do things children would do, yet also show judgement, persistence and intelligence. These are kids who love their parents, and still see that they must take extraordinary steps outside the regimented life they have led. In the end, they do save their city, and if they do not battle great evil, they do encounter and overcome the kind of petty nastiness that is far more common in the world.

On Kindle, the book loses none of its original charm, with the possible exception of the maps and notes. Where these extend across the page, they are difficult to enjoy, even in Zoom mode.

The book works best in tandem with its sequel, The People of Sparks: The Second Book of Ember (Books of Ember). Together, they are an interesting story - even for an adult. I recommend it highly for boys and girls who want something better than comic-book heroes and video-game battles, and for readers who are no longer children, but still yearn toward the hero we can each become.