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Download The Big Picture Story Bible epub book
ISBN:1581342772
Author: David R. Helm
ISBN13: 978-1581342772
Title: The Big Picture Story Bible
Format: lrf mobi lrf rtf
ePUB size: 1367 kb
FB2 size: 1746 kb
DJVU size: 1579 kb
Language: English
Category: Religions
Publisher: Crossway Books (September 17, 2004)
Pages: 456

The Big Picture Story Bible by David R. Helm



David Helm regularly asks questions in the course of the book, proving to be helpful fodder for discussion and interaction with your child. My kids are eager to bring the book to me to read and this gives me great joy as a parent. I am excited to heartily recommend The Big Picture Story Bible. Erik Raymond, blogger; dad of five. I like how the book is illustrated and how all the stories fit together. The questions in The Big Picture Story Bible invite interaction with my children and help them anticipate what is coming next in the story. I enjoy reading this book with my children! -Kendall Cochran, mom of three. I like The Big Picture Story Bible very much. I like how it shows me that Jesus died on a cross and rose again on Easter! -Chloe Cochran, age 6.

David Helm and Gail Schoonmaker have together created a colorful book of Bible stories written especially for children ages 2–7. Rather than simply retelling portions of the Bible, this book presents the big picture-the unified story running th. No child is too young to begin learning about the greatest love story of all-God’s love for his people, as portrayed in the Bible

David R. Helm, Gail Schoonmaker. The Bible is a big book about a big God who keeps a big promise! Everyone loves a good story-especially children! But what we sometimes overlook is that the Bible is more than a collection of great stories. The Big Picture Story Bible presents this remarkable true story. Simple words and striking illustrations unfold the storyline of God's Word from Genesis to Revelation. All ages will enjoy this exciting discovery of a God who keeps his big promise.

David R. Helm and Gail. Designed for kids ages 2-7, this children's Bible presents the remarkable true story of God's love for the world from both the Old and New Testaments with simple words and striking illustrations. ISBN13: 9781433543128. Release Date: July 2014.

David Helm & Gail Schoonmaker. You can read this book with Apple Books on your iPhone, iPad, iPod touch, or Mac.

Help Your Kids Learn the Big Picture of the Bible. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Rather than simply retelling portions of the Bible, this book presents the big picture-the unified story running through the Old and New Testaments. Twenty-six stories together form parts of this big picture. Each page is filled with colorful drawings that beautifully, yet simply illustrate what is happening. The book does take a few liberties in describing some situations, like giving the background for why Caesar decided to count all the people in his kingdom. Additionally, many details about Biblical events or stories are not covered, but are briefly mentioned, if at all.

Tracing the Storyline of the Bible. Books related to The Big Picture Bible Verses. Beginner's Bible e-book, Vol. 6. Helm (MDiv, Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary) serves as lead pastor of the Hyde Park congregation of Holy Trinity Church in Chicago. He also serves as Chairman of The Charles Simeon Trust, an organization which promotes practical instruction in preaching. Gail Schoonmaker (BA, Wheaton College) is an artist based in Chicago

David R Helm and Gail Schoonmaker collaborate to create a beautifully illustrated book of Bible stories especially for children, written with simplicity. Rather than simply retelling the most familiar short scenes from the Bible, this book presents the 'big picture' - the unified story running through the Old and New Testaments. This delightful book will help children learn the Bible’s whole story and begin to appreciate the fulfillment of God’s promise to his people

No child is too young to begin learning about the greatest love story of all-God's love for his people, as portrayed in the Bible. David R. Helm and Gail Schoonmaker collaborate to create a beautifully illustrated book of Bible stories especially for children, written with simplicity. Rather than simply retelling the most familiar short scenes from the Bible, this book presents the "big picture"-the unified story running through the Old and New Testaments. This delightful book will help children learn the Bible's whole story and begin to appreciate the fulfillment of God's promise to his people.

The Big Picture Bible Story Book is perfect for parents to read to their children, and eventually, for children to read on their own. It is an excellent way to introduce them to a book that will guide them through all of life.

Reviews: 7
Gaua
Both the Big Picture Story Bible (BPSB) and the Jesus Storybook Bible (JSB) effectively communicate that the whole of the Bible is about God's great salvation plan throughout the ages. Some differences:
- The language: BPSB skillfully teaches concepts through repetition and simplified words. JSB also uses repetition and non-traditional, untheological words.
- I personally have a hard time getting behind the heavy use of fragments in the JSB. I frequently rephrase to improve the grammar for my children.
- BPSB more fully and accurately teaches the message of each text (e.g. The JSB teaches that Joseph forgave his brothers simply because he couldn't stop loving them. It does not mention their repentance or the period of watching/testing before Joseph revealed himself. BPSB instead emphasizes Joseph's recognition of God's plan in using evil circumstances for good.)
- The language of the JSB is more Arminian than that of the BPSB.
- JSB is longer and contains more Bible Stories. The NT portion of the BPSB is based on the gospel of John and does not contain many of the stories in the synoptic gospels.
- However, BPSB teaches Jesus from beginning to end. There is NO lack of Christ in this book, as another commenter hurriedly asserted. Both books teach Jesus very well.
- BPSB's illustrations are fresh and make the stories of the Bible come to life. Many pages are clearly done in watercolor yet remain vibrant. JSB's are more flat-lined and scribbly and the colors are over-saturated.
- BPSB does illustrate baptism as the pouring of water over the head while standing in a river, which is a con to us baptists. JSB simply shows them standing in the water.
Both books brought me to tears, but BPSB is by far our favorite children's Bible and the one we most recommend to others.
August
Stories are good and my wife and I really wanted to find a bible to read to our son who is two where he can enjoy the pictures and have a good message attached to it. Not always impressed with the stories or the way it is written but you can see it was made for a story book for little kids. It leads to a good foundation. I would purchase it again if I had the chance for my two year old but I don’t know if I would purchase it for my nephew who is 5. It has a cut off age range I feel. Again, great book for quick and colorful stories for my two year old.
Molace
I am so glad our family discovered the "Big Picture" series of resources (see also Big Picture Family Devotional and Big Picture ESV Bible). The Big Picture Story Bible wonderfully explains the thread throughout the entire Bible of God's promise of a land, people, and blessing. I was amazed as a parent after reading and rereading the text how the author had clearly shown me how God's promise related to each story in the book. The simple sentences are great for toddlers while not watering down the message. I love reading my child the chapter on "God's Great Sign," (Exodus Passover) because it paves the way for children to understand blood sacrifice that ultimately points to Jesus' atoning sacrifice. Illustrations are superb as well. My child noticed how Adam looked similar to the "Second Adam" (Jesus, the promised Messiah) at the beginning, which was a perfect way to explain to her the connection between the first Adam (who sinned) and the Second Adam (who conquered sin). Subtle (but I believe intentional), the illustrations of Jacob and his sons in Genesis very closely resembles the illustration of Jesus and his disciples after the resurrection. This reiterates the theme of "God's People" from Old Testament to New. I would not have thought to include the story of the queen of Sheba approaching Solomon for wisdom, but the author clearly shows how God used Solomon to bring blessing (in the form of wisdom) to the world (other nations).

We also have the Big Picture ESV Bible and I love how some of the exact same illustrations are used in that full-length Bible, which will be a great reminder to my child of the great truths she has learned in the Big Picture Story Bible.
Kipabi
We have a growing collection of children's Bibles that we read to our preschool aged son every day but my husband and I agree that this one might be our least favorite. I purchased it after hearing it recommended by a few people I respect but I now just have to assume that they aren't very familiar with much of the great Christian children's literature that is available. I spend a lot of time carefully picking the Bible stories I read to our son and normally wouldn't have purchased this book simply based on the illustrations. It's not the most important thing to me but it is to him and the style in which the people are drawn is absurd: crazy zig-zag beards, distracting wiry hair, pinpoint eyes, and flat, two dimensional drawings. I also find it disturbing that all the people pictured are clearly white.
Secondly, I think that in an attempt to help teach broad theological concepts the author leaves out details that actually make the stories interesting to small children. There are major oversights and significant extra-biblical additions. He regularly draws conclusion that I, as someone who teaches the Bible to adults, do not agree with or find in the Biblical text. I would prefer a bible with a less heavy editorial hand.
Thirdly, though I am grateful that it includes the story of Pentecost, the Holy Spirit is otherwise absent from the book which I find bizarre for a Bible that makes so many theological claims.
The roles of the many women in the Bible are also diminished or absent. Important details are missing from the stories of the few women who do appear in the book: Eve, Mary the mother of Jesus, and Mary Magdalene.
It also complete skips the Last Supper and other significant events the ministry of Jesus, which baffles me.
I like to read to my son from a variety of children's Bibles because they each feature different stories and told in a variety of ways. But my husband and I both find ourselves editing as we read and adding significant missing details every time we read this one together