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Download Secret Garden epub book
ISBN:0140314350
Author: Frances Hodgson Burnett
ISBN13: 978-0140314359
Title: Secret Garden
Format: mobi lrf txt mobi
ePUB size: 1237 kb
FB2 size: 1271 kb
DJVU size: 1851 kb
Language: English
Publisher: Puffin; 1st Edition edition (January 3, 1984)

Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett



3 Finding the secret garden. When Mary woke up two days later, the wind and rain had all disappeared, and the sky was a beautiful blue. Spring’ll be here soon, said Martha happily. You know, the secret garden. Are the flowers dead there? She really wanted to know the answer. Colin forgot about his painful back and sat up in bed, Get out of the room at once! he shouted, and threw a book at her. Im going, Mary shouted in reply, and I won’t come back! The door banged shut behind her.

In 1991, a Japanese anime version was launched for television in Japan. It remains a popular and beloved story of a child's journey into maturity, and a must-read for every child, parent, teacher and anyone who would enjoy this fascinating glimpse of childhood

Frances Hodgson Burnett. Illustrated by Tasha Tudor. Chapter One. There's No One Left. Chapter Two. Mistress Mary Quite Contrary. Enter the World of The Secret Garden. Meet Frances Hodgson Burnett. Learn to Bake Crumpets. Make Your Own Pressed Flowers. Skip Rope with Traditional Rhymes. About the Author and the Illustrator.

This book, The Secret Garden is a kind of book that I would not even consider reading. It is neither a 501 nor a 1001 book. As a child, I read this book at least four or five times, along with Frances Hodgson Burnett's other childhood stories about Sarah Crewe (Little Princess) and Cedric (Lord Fauntleroy). They represented a rite of passage for me as a person and as a reader.

The Secret Garden (1909) is one of Frances Hodgson Burnett’s most popular novels. The book tells the story of Mary Lennox, a spoiled, contrary, solitary child raised in India but sent to live in her uncle’s manor in Yorkshire after her parents' death. She is left to herself by her uncle, Mr. Craven, who travels often to escape the memory of his deceased wife. The only person who has time for Mary is her chambermaid, Martha.

Read The Secret Garden by author Frances Hodgson Burnett, FREE, online. Who's On Your Reading List? Read Classic Books Online for Free at Page by Page Books. The Secret Garden Frances Hodgson Burnett.

Читать книгу The Secret Garden. Автор Burnett Frances Hodgson. Бесплатно читать книги популярного автора Burnett Frances Hodgson онлайн. Без регистрации и без смс в онлайн библиотеке. Chapter I. there is no one left. When Mary Lennox was sent to Misselthwaite Manor to live with her uncle everybody said she was the most child ever seen.

The Secret Garden is a novel by Frances Hodgson Burnett first published in book form in 1911 following the publication in 1910 of a serial version in a US magazine. Set in England, it is one of Burnett's most popular novels and is considered a classic of English children's literature. Several stage and film adaptations have been made

Thank you and enjoy! The Secret Garden by Frances Hodgson Burnett is a classic children’s tale that I think adults can enjoy too. As part of my Books We Should Have Read book club, this was the March read and it was a good choice since reading about gardens and growing things keeps me hopeful that Spring will eventually come. I knew this story inside and out because I had seen the movie several times before I knew that it was based on the book written by Burnett. I can say that there are a few discrepancies in the story between the movie and the book, but it stayed mostly true to Burnett’s world. Although, this story by the description can sound rather morbid, with Mary being sickly and orphaned when she arrives, her uncle being an unhappy widowed hunchback and Colin being doomed to a sad, unhealthy and short life, it is actually a story of hope.

The Secret Garden
Reviews: 7
Tygrafym
People are naturally inclined to hand out the "instant classic" award to the books they like, but there are only a precious few books that can hold on to such a title for over a hundred years, (this was published in book form in 1911), and still stay fresh, engaging and appealing. This book is the source and template for so many children's lit conventions that it is hard to imagine a library without multiple copies.

You can sample the book as a Kindle freebie or in some other downloadable form, since it's out of copyright and readily available. Then, and better yet, after you read it and discover its pleasures, look for a nice edition to give to each young reader you know. There are easy to read books that are shallow, and there are harder to read books with considerable depth, but this one manages to be accessible to a fairly young reader and yet still loaded with fine writing, style, character, mystery, romance, adventure and inspiration. An excellent choice.

And while you're at it, take a look at Burnett's "Little Lord Fauntleroy". He's gotten a bad rap, (probably as a result of those Fauntleroy suits and haircuts that were the rage in the twenties), but he's actually smart , level headed, and shrewdly decent in unexpected ways. So go and get your Burnett on.
Abuseyourdna
I am not really sure how I missed out on this book as a child so I decided to read it with my daughter. We thoroughly enjoyed the experience and zipped through it in just a few days. Frances Hodgson Burnett shares some amazing insights into human nature with the reader. My daughter exclaimed at one point, “How can Mary see that Colin is spoiled but not see that she was the same at first too?” Led to some great discussions for sure! I also thought it was amazing that Burnett at times switches between different third person limited perspectives and we even have some of the events in the garden narrated from the point of view of the robin! Such clever writing!

Some reviewers complained about the fact that many of the characters speak with a Yorkshire accent and Frances Hodgson Burnett wrote it phonetically the way the characters pronounced the words. I thought it added to the fun! I tried to speak with the broad Yorkshire accent as I read it out loud and changed my voice for the different characters. My daughter and I both loved it. The Yorkshire dialect was interesting and we have been trying to throw some of the words we learned into conversation such as “wick” meaning alive or lively. From my point of view, that beats trying to throw something modern like “on fleek” into conversation!
Lonesome Orange Kid
I should have read the other reviews. Luckily, you are reading this... so move along.

This is NOT "The Secret Garden". It is "A CONSIDERABLY ABRIDGED Cliff's Notes style childrens re-enactment of The Secret Garden". Nowhere in the description did it say that this was not the real book. It's like half an inch think written in 25 pt. font. My 10 year old daughter read it in less than an hour. Her last book.... Little Women. The real one. 800 pages. I promised her she would like this. Instead she just looked at me like..."really?". And I don't blame her. Seller should update the description.

Sorry, but anyone else leaving a higher rating may simply not realize that they received a fraud.

PROS: Very pretty cover. Hardback.
CONS: See everything I wrote above.
Prorahun
I never read this as a child, and I think I'm glad. Reading it now, as an over-60, garden-loving mom with lots of life experience, I think I appreciate it a lot more, although I would have loved the mystery as a kid. Now I can appreciate the serious racism, the sad child(ren) neglect, the rather pagan awakening to nature (clothed as "Magic"), and the joyous, if obvious, ending. I believe the writing was very good for its time, and had no problem with the Yorkshire dialect. Mary and Colin and Dickon all struck me as very believable characters, and the changes wrought in Mary and Colin were overall pretty credible, although they happened a bit too quickly. I had more of a problem with Archibald's rejection of his son for ten whole years. Dwelt just a bit much on the beauty and changeableness of the moors. Well worth reading.