» » Benno and the Night of Broken Glass (Holocaust)
Download Benno and the Night of Broken Glass (Holocaust) epub book
ISBN:0822599759
Author: Josee Bisaillon,Meg Wiviott
ISBN13: 978-0822599753
Title: Benno and the Night of Broken Glass (Holocaust)
Format: lit docx lrf azw
ePUB size: 1487 kb
FB2 size: 1181 kb
DJVU size: 1816 kb
Language: English
Category: Literature and Fiction
Publisher: Kar-Ben Publishing; 01-Apr-10 edition (March 18, 2010)
Pages: 28

Benno and the Night of Broken Glass (Holocaust) by Josee Bisaillon,Meg Wiviott



Benno cowers as terrifying men in brown shirts light bonfires, and then there is a night 'like no other, ' during which Benno hears screams and shattering glass, and he watches apartments being ravaged and the synagogue burn. The next day, life continues for some, but Benno never sees others again, including Sophie and her family. Format: PaperbackVerified Purchase.

Benno and the Night of Broken Glass (Holocaust).

Wiviott, Meg. Publication, Distribution, et. Minneapolis, M. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Benno and the Night of Broken Glass, Meg Wiviott ; illustrated by Jose?e Bisallion. Benno and The Night of Broken Glass. Illustrated by Josee Bisaillon. Kar-Ben Publishing/Lerner Pub, 2010. This night will forever be known as Kristallnacht, or The Night of Broken Glass. For Benno and the people he loves, nothing will ever be the same, for they will never see many of these Rosenstrasse residents again. This dark event marks the beginning of the nightmare known as the Holocaust. Wiviott uses a unique way of telling a Holocaust story, through the eyes of a cat, that allows for a whole new perspective on the event, Kristallnacht. Bissaillon uses stark illustrations that change from bright to muted colors with only the symbolic flames of change in red contrast. The text of the fictional story in a historical setting ends abruptly-a metaphor for the events about to be unleashed.

A neighborhood cat observes the changes in German and Jewish families in its town during the period leading up to Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass that becomes the true beginning of the Holocaust. This cats-eye view introduces the Holocaust to children in a gentle way that can open discussion of this period. Users who liked this book, also liked. Rihanna - A Girl like Me (Piano/Vocal/Guitar Artist Songbook) (English).

Benno recalls the terror he and the people he loves felt during the night of broken glass - Kristallnacht. Benno sees people being taken away, glass windows being broken, s It has always seemed that cats are the ultimate people watcher. For many, Kristallnacht marked the beginning of the Holocaust. Meg Wiviott and Josee Bisaillon have chosen to tell the story of the events of that night through the eyes of a neighbourhood cat, Benno. The book follows Benno as he completes the comforting rituals of his daily life in a Berlin neighborhood; visiting homes and stores for snacks and ear scratches, following Inge and her Jewish friend, Sophie, to school and to the park, and finally falling asleep in his cat bed by the furnace in an a For many, Kristallnacht marked the beginning of the Holocaust.

Meg Wiviott illustrated by. Josée Bisaillon. Benno the cat lived at Number 5 Rosenstrasse in Berlin, just a few blocks from the Neue Synagogue. He had a nice warm bed near the furnace where Hans, the Hausmeister, left him fresh milk every night. On Friday nights, Benno visited the Adler family in Apartment 3B. He watched Mrs. Adler light Sabbath candles, Mr. Adler slice a braided loaf of bread, and Sophie sing from a book she held close. After dinner, Sophie fed him scraps of chicken. On Sundays after church, Benno visited the Schmidts, across the hall in Apartment 3A, for their family lunch. Crystal Night: A Gripping Documentary of the Nazi Night of Terror that was Prelude to the Holocaust, Coward, McCann & Geoghegan, In. New York, 1974. Additional Children’s Books About the Holocaust Abells, Chana Byers. The Children We Remember.

Benno the cat has it pretty good, with a nice warm bed by the furnace of a Berlin apartment building, fresh milk every night, scraps from Shabbat dinners at the Adlers' apartment and Sunday lunches with the Schmidts. by Meg Wiviott & illustrated by Josée Bisaillon. Benno the cat has it pretty good, with a nice warm bed by the furnace of a Berlin apartment building, fresh milk every night, scraps from Shabbat dinners at the Adlers’ apartment and Sunday lunches with the Schmidts.

Benno and the Night of Broken Glass by Meg Wiviott, illustrated by Josee Bisaillon A neighborhood cat observes the changes in both the German and Jewish families in it’s town during the period leading up to Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass, the true beginning of the Holocaust. The Whispering Town by Jennifer Elvgren In a small Danish fishing village, a Jewish family must escape in pitch blackness. Children’s Chapter Books About WWII’s Holocaust. Hidden: A Child’s Story of the Holocaust by Loic Dauvillier, Greg Salsedo, illustrated by Marc Lizano ages 6 – 10 (graphic novel) Now a grandmother, Dounia tells her granddaughter about when she was a young girl and hid from the Nazis with her neighbors. The Book Thief by Marcus Zusak ages 10+ Death narrates the story of Liesel, a girl lives in Munich during the time of Nazi Germany.

A neighborhood cat observes the changes in German and Jewish families in Berlin during the period leading up to Kristallnacht, the Night of Broken Glass. This cat's-eye view introduces the Holocaust to children in a gentle way that can open discussion of this period.

Reviews: 7
Timberahue
I added this book to my library. It tells the true story of the Jews and how they were treated.
Iraraeal
I read this to my students as part of my Holocaust instruction. I teach 5th graders, and I walk a fine line of being truthful without sugarcoating or being too graphic. This book was the second read aloud I did, after The Terrible Things, and it worked perfectly. My students analyzed the pictures and were thoughtful when I read the real account of what happened. We also had a discussion about author purpose so students could identify why the author wrote what she did and who was the intended audience.

Overall, this is an excellent resource. I was able to introduce the topic and then move onto additional content.
Kazijora
Good to use during Jewish history month to teach a hard to understand concept to young people. Good also to use different perspectives for teaching the hard concept of perspective/ point of view
Nalmergas
It shows the before and after for the lives of those living in Berlin both Jewish and non-Jewish. It depicts the emotion, damage, and fear that reigned that night. It has an excellent afterword with a non-fiction account of the event.
IWAS
Great!
ARE
Wonderful story to help introduce the Holocaust unit to my middle schoolers.
Fararala
I had to read this for my adolescent literature class. I it is a wonderful book.
I bought it for my 12 year old grandson and I think it was a start for him to (gently) understanding the Holocaust!