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ISBN:0375922318
Author: Michael Capuzzo
ISBN13: 978-0375922312
Title: Close to Shore: The Terrifying Shark Attacks of 1916
Format: mbr lit azw txt
ePUB size: 1219 kb
FB2 size: 1618 kb
DJVU size: 1316 kb
Language: English
Category: History
Publisher: Crown Books for Young Readers (April 22, 2003)

Close to Shore: The Terrifying Shark Attacks of 1916 by Michael Capuzzo



The most frightening animal on earth"Michael Capuzzo has the soul of a novelist; this is not only evident in the dramatic episode which forms the prologue of CLOSE TO SHORE, but also in the flowery and descriptive narrative which occurs in abundance throughout the rest of the book.

Michael Capuzzo, Mike Capuzzo. From School Library Journal Grade 6-10-An adaptation of Capuzzo's adult book, Close to Shore: A True Story of Terror in an Age of Innocence (Broadway, 2001). During the summer of 1916, just as railroad travel enabled city dwellers to make day-trips to the seashore and swimming in the ocean became popular, bathers along the East Coast were frightened away by a series of vicious attacks in the water. Capuzzo describes the shark's quest to satiate his hunger with the flesh of humans, sometimes verging close to anthropomorphism as he builds an atmosphere of suspense about the creature, its wanderings and its means of attack.

Close to Shore" is a detailed, scientific, sociological look at society in 1916 with the added bonus of the focus on reactions to shark attacks. Capuzzo gives us the history behind Benchley's "Jaws," as well as the habits/life cycle of sharks.

Combining rich historical detail and a harrowing, pulse-pounding narrative, Close to Shore brilliantly re-creates the summer of 1916, when a rogue Great White shark attacked swimmers along the New Jersey shore, triggering mass hysteria and launching the most extensive shark hunt in history

The Jersey Shore shark attacks of 1916 were a series of shark attacks along the coast of New Jersey, in the United States, between July 1 and 12, 1916, in which four people were killed and one injured. Since 1916, scholars have debated which shark species was responsible and the number of animals involved, with the great white shark and the bull shark most frequently cited

Close To ShoreThe Terrifying Shark Attacks Of 1916By: Michael Capuzzo. B2A. Broadway Books 2001. Close To Shore takes place along the coast of New Jersey. In the beginning of the book, a man was swimming out into the ocean with his dog. After he thought he had reached a good distance, he came back to the shore, but.

The first recorded shark attacks in the United States happened in the New Jersey shore in July 1916, when a Great White swam to the beaches near Beach Haven and Spring Lake - and, incredibly, to a creek 11 miles inland - and killed four people. Capuzzo draws vivid portraits of the central characters involved (including the shark), and captures the national frenzy caused by the attacks.

This Study Guide consists of approximately 29 pages of chapter summaries, quotes, character analysis, themes, and more - everything you need to sharpen your knowledge of Close to Shore. Print Word PDF. This section contains 458 words (approx. 2 pages at 400 words per page). Close to Shore: The Terrifying Shark Attacks of 1916 Summary & Study Guide Description. Close to Shore: The Terrifying Shark Attacks of 1916 Summary & Study Guide includes comprehensive information and analysis to help you understand the book.

Combining rich historical detail and a harrowing, pulse-pounding narrative, Close to Shore brilliantly re-creates the summer of 1916, when a rogue Great White shark attacked swimmers along the New Jersey shore, triggering mass hysteria and launching the most extensive shark hunt in history. During the summer before the United States entered World War I, when ocean swimming was just becoming popular and luxurious Jersey Shore resorts were thriving as a chic playland for an opulent yet still innocent era's new leisure class, Americans were abruptly introduced to the terror of sharks. In July 1916 a lone Great White left its usual deep-ocean habitat and headed in the direction of the New Jersey shoreline. There, near the towns of Beach Haven and Spring Lake-and, incredibly, a farming community eleven miles inland-the most ferocious and unpredictable of predators began a deadly rampage: the first shark attacks on swimmers in U.S. history. For Americans celebrating an astoundingly prosperous epoch much like our own, fueled by the wizardry of revolutionary inventions, the arrival of this violent predator symbolized the limits of mankind's power against nature.Interweaving a vivid portrait of the era and meticulously drawn characters with chilling accounts of the shark's five attacks and the frenzied hunt that ensued, Michael Capuzzo has created a nonfiction historical thriller with the texture of Ragtime and the tension of Jaws. From the unnerving inevitability of the first attack on the esteemed son of a prosperous Philadelphia physician to the spine-tingling moment when a farm boy swimming in Matawan Creek feels the sandpaper-like skin of the passing shark, Close to Shore is an undeniably gripping saga.Heightening the drama are stories of the resulting panic in the citizenry, press and politicians, and of colorful personalities such as Herman Oelrichs, a flamboyant millionaire who made a bet that a shark was no match for a man (and set out to prove it); Museum of Natural History ichthyologist John Treadwell Nichols, faced with the challenge of stopping a mythic sea creature about which little was known; and, most memorable, the rogue Great White itself moving through a world that couldn't conceive of either its destructive power or its moral right to destroy.Scrupulously researched and superbly written, Close to Shore brings to life a breathtaking, pivotal moment in American history. Masterfully written and suffused with fascinating period detail and insights into the science and behavior of sharks, Close to Shore recounts a breathtaking, pivotal moment in American history with startling immediacy.From the Trade Paperback edition.
Reviews: 7
Goldfury
Outstanding book. I bought this book months ago and just now finished it. I tend to read several at once, but when I got into this book it was hard to put it down. This was a very informative book not only about Great White Sharks, but of the times this story took place back in 1916. After reading, I want to travel to the East Coast and check out the actual sites where it happened. I had honestly never heard of the creek attacks in New Jersey. I do highly recommend this book to anyone that loves history.
Malakelv
Well written account of the 1916 shark attacks along the New Jersey shore which resulted in a number of deaths, no small degree of panic and a frantic bunch of inept amateur shark hunters. The Peter Benchley book 'Jaws' and later the movie with the same title were loosely based on this series of incidents. The movie script even referenced the 1916 attacks. While the real life shark was not nearly so large as the 25 footer in the movie, the true life events were, in a number of ways, even more incredible than those depicted in the movie including "we're gonna need a bigger boat" but excluding the eating of Robert Shaw. The book gives excellent insight into the incredible lack of knowledge in that time period regarding sharks and their behaviors.
Anarawield
The book--about a series of East Coast shark attacks that inspired the writing of JAWS-- held my interest and provided a glimpse into the social life of a period (early 20th century) that I didn't know much about. There were memorable real-life characters, plus some a few blood-in-the-water thrills.
If you want to understand sharks in a way that goes deeper than headlines and more scientific than JAWS, this book will likely please you. It quotes a number of world-class sharp experts. And it treats sharks with respect.

But ultimately I felt that "Close to Share" was a shaggy shark story. The climax was underwhelming. Perhaps this was because the author was determined to tell the truth. I admire him for taking that position. But somehow the earlier parts of the book created an expectation that there'd be a dramatic conclusion. And that expectation wasn't met.
Voodoogore
This was an interesting, if not wonderful, book. It was more about American society in 1916 and the effects of the shark attacks on that society than it actually was about the shark itself. At a time when Europe was desperately fighting World War 1 and America was on the verge of joining the conflict, when a plague of polio was killing between ten and twenty people a day in New York City alone, the shark attacks managed to push all of the above off the front pages of newspapers and out of the mind of Americans. Sharks were the thought and fear of the day.

For the skill with which Mr. Capuzzo captured the mind of America at a very specific time, I might have given the book four stars, but the book seemed to dwindle toward the end. The rogue shark killed a very small fraction of the number of people dying daily from polio and certainly an infinitesimal number when compared with the casualties of the on-going war. And of all of these dangers, sharks were avoidable. Yet all of at least Eastern America was in a panic about the sharks and all "manly" men within reach of a coast were out hunting and killing sharks. When the book described one of these hunts, I wasn't even certain that it was the rogue shark that had been killed until pages later. Perhaps Capuzzo's point was that the particular shark mattered less than the danger and excitement of the hunt, but the effect, at least for me, was anti-climactic. Perhaps Mr. Capuzzo treated his material this way on purpose, once again to shift his subject matter from the shark to the mind of America, but in doing so, he undermined much of the tension and suspense of the book as a whole.
Quamar
Very interesting accounting of the incidents of 1916 presented within a detailed framework of the social, political cultural environment of the era. While there are definitely tense, thrilling sections in the book but if you are looking for a quick-read shark thriller, this is probably not for you. There were many times when I could smell, hear, visualize and almost feel what it was like at a given moment there on the Jersey coast in 1916, and I even got a glimpse into what the shark might have been experiencing.
Agalen
"Close to Shore" is a detailed, scientific, sociological look at society in 1916 with the added bonus of the focus on reactions to shark attacks.

Capuzzo gives us the history behind Benchley's "Jaws," as well as the habits/life cycle of sharks. For anyone interested in the science and biodiversity of the sea, the shark chapters are enough reason to buy the book. Add to those the state of American science in oceanography during the early 1900s, and we have more interesting ideas, including that people didn't believe sharks were dangerous to man until the 1916 attacks--at least in America along the Eastern shore.

Another fascinating part of the book is the sociological commentary on the sport of swimming in the ocean. I knew that the Romantics prized swimming (Lord Byron swam the Dardenelles), but assumed everybody swam. The beach is a fundamental part of my family's traditions. Capuzzo takes us from the sheltered "bathing wagons" of modesty for women to the scandalous baring of ANKLES to the new swimming costumes that freed the arms along with sundry other comments on the role of journalism and sensationalism.

This is an educational summer read as long as it doesn't give you a new phobia about SHARKS off the coast of all beaches.