» » King George: What Was His Problem?: Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn't Tell You About the American Revolution
Download King George: What Was His Problem?: Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn't Tell You About the American Revolution epub book
ISBN:1596433191
Author: Tim Robinson,Steve Sheinkin
ISBN13: 978-1596433199
Title: King George: What Was His Problem?: Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn't Tell You About the American Revolution
Format: lrf txt docx mbr
ePUB size: 1820 kb
FB2 size: 1960 kb
DJVU size: 1184 kb
Language: English
Category: History
Publisher: Flash Point (May 27, 2008)
Pages: 208

King George: What Was His Problem?: Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn't Tell You About the American Revolution by Tim Robinson,Steve Sheinkin



First published: The American Revolution, written and illustrated by Steve Sheinkin. Stamford, CT : Summer Street Press, c2005, in series: Storyteller's history. Summary, et. What do the most famous traitor in history, hundreds of naked soldiers, and a salmon lunch have in common? They're all part of the amazing story of the American Revolution. leave here couple of words about this book: Tags: Blood.

Paired with illustrator Tim Robinson, Sheinkin isn't adverse to a little skimming himself, but for the most part this is probably the most interesting book on the revolution for kids you're going to find this side of Jean Fritz u. .Paul Revere rode around on a horse yeah. King George What's his Problem is a very good book with lots of info about the revolution with lots of humor.

I myself learned a ton about the American Revolution that I never knew. We're planning to read Sheinkin's Civil War book next. One person found this helpful.

Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn't Tell You About the American Revolution. by Steve Sheinkin and Tim Robinson. King george never DID understand americans. Entire books have been written about the causes of the American Revolution. King George - Steve Sheinkin. How to Start a Revolution. You’ll be glad to know this isn’t one of them. But you really should understand how the whole thing got started. After all, if you ever find yourself ruled by someone like King George, you’ll want to know what to do. So here’s a quick step-by-step guide to starting a revolution. Step 1: Kick Out the French. Let’s pick up the action in 1750.

by Steve Sheinkin and Tim Robinson. To help put the right book in each reader's hands, consider the following comprehensive text complexity analyses within your instructional plans. Standards Model of Text Complexity. Text Complexity Toolkit. Perhaps you can help. 1. National Governors Association for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers.

What do the most famous traitor in history, hundreds of naked soldiers, and a salmon lunch have in common? They're all part of the amazing story of the American Revolution. Abstract: What do the most famous traitor in history, hundreds of naked soldiers, and a salmon lunch have in common? They're all part of the amazing story of the American Revolution. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. The notorious Benedict Arnold : a true story of adventure, heroism, & treachery.

Written by Steve Sheinkin and Illustrated by Tim Robinson. The story of the birth of our nation, complete with soldiers, spies, salmon sandwiches, and real facts is presented in a narrative tale filled with little-known details and lots of quotes. We offer many activity ideas for supporting books of this type here.

Steve Sheinkin; Tim Robinson. This button opens a dialog that displays additional images for this product with the option to zoom in or out. Tell us if something is incorrect. King George: What Was His Problem? : Everything Your Schoolbooks Didn't Tell You About the American Revolution. Steve Sheinkin; Tim Robinson.

They turn into teenagers and find out that much of what they learned was prettified or their textbooks left out huge chunks of morally ambiguous grey matter. A little foggy on the details? Well in King George: What Was His Problem? author Steve Sheinkin brings the 18th century into focus like no one else. With section headings like Revere and That Other Guy and How to Start a Revolution, kids will learn just as much about George Washington’s atrocious love poetry as they will the details of General Burgoyne’s Pretty Good Plan.

KING GEORGE NEVER DID UNDERSTAND AMERICANS

"Entire books have been written about the causes of the American Revolution. This isn't one of them." What it is, instead, is utterly interesting, antedotes (John Hancock fixates on salmon), from the inside out (at the Battle of Eutaw Springs, hundreds of soldiers plunged into battle "naked as they were born") close-up narrative filled with little-known details, lots of quotes that capture the spirit and voices of the principals ("If need be, I will raise one thousand men, subsist them at my own expense, and march myself at their head for the relief of Boston" -- George Washington), and action, It's the story of the birth of our nation, complete with soldiers, spies, salmon sandwiches, and real facts you can't help but want to tell to everyone you know.King George: What Was His Problem? is a 2009 Bank Street - Best Children's Book of the Year.

Reviews: 7
avanger
I cannot say enough great things about this book!
Here is one question for you though. Do you know who Ethan Allen was? I didn't but this book will tell you. I home school my daughters and found this book in our local library by accident. I thought it looked interesting so I checked it out. I quickly realized that it was a book I needed to own. There is so much to learn in this book! And it is extremely well written! Love the humor. Love the stories and people I never learned about in school. Love learning about Sam Adams and why the Stamp Act didn't work. I think libraries should have this book in the children's and the adult's sections. While looking up something else in the library with the librarians help we again ran across this book. I asked the librarian if she had read it. She said no. I told her a couple of the cool stories like the Ethan Allen. She brought it to her desk to read. The next time I was in the library she saw me and told me how much she had enjoyed to book too.
When were reading this book my daughters did not want me to stop reading. They would even ask if I could read more. We all laughed until we cried about the Sam Adams and the Stamp Act.
I have read sections to my parents. They borrowed the book and on their summer RV trip my mom reads it to my dad while he is driving. It has caused them to stop and see Fort Ticonderoga.
Whether you homeschool or not this is a fantastic book that your whole family will enjoy and learn from.
I have since bought other books by Steve Sheinkin. Love them too. I also checked out "Bomb" from our library and read it too. It is about the atomic bomb. Wow did I learn a ton! My husband is reading it now.
Thanks so much Mr. Sheinkin!
Saimath
My 8 yr old son and I have read dozens of books on the American Revolution together, so for us the book didn’t contain a lot of “new” information - but it’s written in such a captivating and funny way, that it ended up being one of our favorites nonetheless! I did find it interesting that Shenkin doesn’t seem to have the most favorable impression of Alexander Hamilton...? If you’re the Hamilton fan that I am, try not to be offended. ; )
I love Mercedes
I teach 4th and 5th graders. I bought this to share with my hungry chickadees. I brought it into the classroom, set it down to take care of some things and heard a ruckus going on. I turned around to find at least four students calling dibs on it, others pleading to read it. A history book that the kids are fighting to read?? ....You can't ask for more than that!
Leyl
I am in eighth grade, and I thought this book was well written and humorous. The book describes the many battles between the Americans and the British in the 13 original colonies that the Revolutionary War was composed of. The book's main subject is about the Revolutionary War, however, the author divides each of the different people and battles into different sections to keep the story interesting. The book contains real quotes from actual people involved in the war and what their perspective was. I would recommend this book to anyone who is interested in American history or enjoys funny books.
Runeshaper
I can't recommend this book highly enough. We have loved every minute of reading it. My 11-year-old daughter, upon finishing the book, said, "He is such a great writer! Can we read more history books written by him?" I myself learned a ton about the American Revolution that I never knew. We're planning to read Sheinkin's Civil War book next. What a gift to be able to share history with my kids in a way that is fascinating and exciting — not dull!
Topmen
I don't want the details. I want the main events. But give me the feel too. That is what this book does.
Sha
Sheinkin does a phenomenal job in researching the side stories — he makes history fun! This book is captivating for readers of all ages! Get the inside scoop on all the Revolutionary War figures and laugh your way through it! Entertaining!
I bought this book because of the title. I have always thought George III was a dullard so I was dieing to find out exactly what the title promised...what was his problem??? When I opened it up, I realized that this book was about the American Revolution (Yes, I missed the small print in the subtitle). Horror! Not another American history book. As a native of Boston, we laugh at the tourists who think the Battle of Bunker Hill was really fought on Bunker Hill. And there are only so many Boston duck tours and Lexington Battle reenactments that one person can stand in a lifetime. So you can imagine my disappointment when I realized the book that I thought would teach kids about royalty was really about those ruffians, our founding fathers. Don't kids have enough books on the American Revolution?

Boy was I wrong. Kids need this book.

First off, Sheinkin's book is full of amusing antidotes about real people and not the cardboard cutouts that appear in text books. For example, who would have thought that Sam Adams, the sharp dressed guy on my favorite beer, was a sloppy dresser and had a thing for salmon. Did you know that Patrick Henry was a bit of a motor mouth? Yes, we hear tales of Washington's troops being a bunch of hooligans, but did you know that Washington also had to break up a thousand-man snow ball fight between Massachusetts and Virginia?

What really sucked me in was not just the trivia. Sheinkin has a rare ability to tell history from all sides without getting too weighed down in the details. Best of all, he remembered the ladies. For example, did you know that Hannah Davis could watch the minutemen battling from her house? Have you ever thought about what Dorothy Quincy was doing in the middle of the melee? You will have to get the book to find out.

Readers also get plenty of real quotes, letters, maps, and George Washington's bad love poems. The text book information is there, but the pace is faster than Billy Dawes famous ride (Sheinkin calls this section "Revere and That Other Guy") Yes, King George III only makes a few cameo appearances, but the reader won't miss him. (I still think he is a dullard) Overall, what really makes King George work is the fact that readers can take away far more than George's dilemma. You start to see what everyone's problem was, and most importantly, how so many colorful personalities (with very different opinions) came together for one goal.

A quick mention on the art: Tim Robinson's hilarious pen and ink illustrations also give an extra layer of sauciness to the characters. George has the perpetual "I can't believe I am being disobeyed" look of shock and Robinson captures the blustering, larger-than-life nature of Ethan Allen perfectly.

Note: The age range is 9-12, but I really hate when Amazon dumps books into this category. The age range should say 9+ because adults will enjoy this book as much as kids.