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ISBN:0802789080
Author: Jane Dyer,Kathleen Krull
ISBN13: 978-0802789082
Title: A Woman for President: The Story of Victoria Woodhull
Format: doc lit lrf docx
ePUB size: 1799 kb
FB2 size: 1698 kb
DJVU size: 1387 kb
Language: English
Category: History
Publisher: Walker Childrens; Original edition (August 1, 2004)
Pages: 32

A Woman for President: The Story of Victoria Woodhull by Jane Dyer,Kathleen Krull



So how could Victoria Woodhull run for president in 1872 as the candidate of the Equal Rights Party? Well, the eligibility criteria in Article 2, Section 1 of the Constitution did not specify gender, so Ms. Woodhull was eligible. Ironically she was one year too young to be eligible, since she was not yet 35-but she ran anyway. For perspective, that was twenty years after Geraldine Ferraro ran for Vice President beside Walter Mondale, four years before Sarah Palin was on the ticket for Vice President with John McCain, and twelve years before Hillary Clinton became the first woman nominated by a major party as their candidate for President. Now, what of the book itself? The illustrations by Jane Dyer are exceptionally beautiful, lushly colored, and convey a sense of history. They are easy on the eyes. They are sufficiently complex to respect children in eighth grade.

A Woman for President book. In the first book about Victoria Woodhull for young readers, Kathleen Krull and Jane Dyer team up to bring one of the most fascinating personalities in . The perfect book to explore the electoral process during the upcoming presidential election. One of the most revolutionary American women has been forgotten by history-until now. - Walker & Company is proud to welcome acclaimed biographer Kathleen Krull and talented illustrator Jane Dyer to our list.

by Kathleen Krull and Jane Dyer. Submit Qualitative Text Complexity Rubric for A Woman For President. About the Authors(5). Audio Name Pronunciation with Kathleen Krull Created by TeachingBooks. Kathleen Krull page on TeachingBooks. Jane Dyer page on TeachingBooks. Perhaps you can help. 1. National Governors Association for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers.

MY HERO recommends this book to children readers. From the Publisher In 1872, American women couldn't vote, but they could run for president. Can you name the first woman to run for president, or the first woman to have a seat on the stock exchange? Do you know the first woman to own a newspaper or to speak before Congress? Amazingly, one woman achieved each of these feats, and her name has been all but erased from history. Born in complete poverty, the seventh of ten children, Victoria Woodhull was supporting her family by the age of eight as a child preacher.

Victoria Woodhull was the first woman to do many things: the first woman to own a newspaper, to speak before Congress, and to have a seat on the stock exchange. But her boldest act was announcing herself as the first female candidate for the presidency of the United States in 1872-before women even had the right to vote. Arguably one of the most revolutionary women in American history, she was many years ahead of her time, braking boundaries. But her presidential campaign, and the backlash it sparked, left her in political ruin and bankruptcy

Dyer grew up in New Jersey and Pennsylvania. A Woman For President: The Story of Victoria Woodhull (Kathleen Krull, 2006) Illustrator. Oh My Baby, Little One (Kathi Appelt, 2006) Illustrator. Cinderella's Dress (Nancy Willard, 2003) Illustrator.

A woman for president. The Story of Victoria Woodhull. by Kathleen Krull & illustrated by Jane Dyer. Krull, whose many gifts include the ability to make a complicated life comprehensible, and Dyer, whose pictorial sweetness does not mask an iron vision, offer the life of the feminist, spiritualist, and activist Victoria Woodhull.

Kathleen Krull, illustrated by Jane Dyer, 2004. A beautifully illustrated book for ages 9-12. Victoria Woodhull's Sexual Revolution: Political Theater and the Popular Press in Nineteenth-Century America (Non-Fiction). Amanda Frisken, 2004. This book is the most scholarly of the Woodhull biographies and was written by a Professor of American Studies at the State University of New York, Old Westbury. The material is original and the author sought out primary sources whereever possible. Underhill contacted the British family of Woodhull's last husband John Biddulph Martin for previously unpublished material.

Kathleen Krull is the author of "A Woman for President: The Story of Victoria Woodhull, " illustrated by Jane Dyer, and "Lives of Extraordinary Women: Rulers, Rebels (and What the Neighbors Thought), " illustrated by Kathryn Hewitt, as well as a number of other acclaimed biographies for young readers. She lives in San Diego, California. Contact Us. Site Map. RACKSPACE.

Illustrated by. Jane Dyer. Overcoming a difficult childhood, Victoria took control of her own destiny in sometimes unorthodox ways and became the first woman to run for . President in 1872 before women even had the right to vote (Frederick Douglass was nominated to run as Vice President).

In 1872, American women couldn't vote, but they could run for president.

Can you name the first woman to run for president, or the first womanto have a seat on the stock exchange? Do you know the first woman to own a newspaper or to speak before Congress?

Amazingly, one woman achieved each of these feats, and her name has been all but erased from history. Born in complete poverty, the seventh of ten children, Victoria Woodhull was supporting her family by the age of eight as a child preacher. Seeking a better life, she married, divorced, moved to New York City, and became a millionaire by offering Cornelius Vanderbilt financial advice from the spirit world.

Victoria did not stop there. Now that she had money and power, she was ready to challenge society's harsh limitations on women. Her boldest act was announcing herself as the first female candidate for the presidency of the United States. She founded her own newspaper to publicize this groundbreaking campaign, which took her from the chambers of Congress to the glorious moment when she was nominated by the Equal Rights Party at a convention that she, a woman, had organized and funded.

In the first book about Victoria Woodhull for young readers, Kathleen Krull and Jane Dyer team up to bring one of the most fascinating personalities in U.S. history to life.

- The perfect book to explore the electoral process during the upcoming presidential election.- One of the most revolutionary American women has been forgotten by history-until now.- Walker & Company is proud to welcome acclaimed biographer Kathleen Krull and talented illustrator Jane Dyer to our list.

Reviews: 3
Chuynopana
Victoria Woodhull was nominated for President of the United States in 1872 with a black man as her running mate, because as we all know racists love a black man in the White House. She and her family were kicked out of the Gilsey House hotel when her sister Tennessee Claflin went off in a carriage with four black militia officers, because we all know racists like nothing better than to have their sister ride alone in the company of armed black men. Woodhull predicted that in the U.S. the European, Asian, and African races would "coalesce" to form a "new race." She said, "The new race will combine all these different qualities in one grand character, and shall ultimately gather in all people of all races." Of course she said that because as we all know racists advocate interracial marriage.

Call me old fashioned but shouldn't a book review about Kathleen Krull's and Jane Dyer's book be about it and not about Michael W. Perry's books on Victoria Woodhull? His books were written for adults from a pro-life, anti-feminist perspective. It's Perry and not Amazon.com that claims that Woodhull's "speeches and writings laid the eugenic foundation..." His conclusion that Woodhull advocated forced sterilization is contentious if not disputable. Most of Woodhull's life she advocated education or moral suasion rather than the law as a means of societal reform.

Perry's anti-feminist audience isn't the same audience that would find Krull's book appealing. Krull's book would be appealing to parents looking for a female positive role model for their daughters. Because of Woodhull's scandalous background, a children's book about her is a challenging task to accomplish. Krull managed to write a book that is age appropriate considering the topic, and the illustrations IMHO are beautiful. The reason I can't highly recommend the book is because of a number of inaccuracies in the book as follows:

1) According to the book Woodhull was the first woman to have a seat on the stock exchange. While Woodhull and Claflin were the first female stockbrokers in the U.S., they never held a seat on the exchange. They were forced to conduct their business using male agents because ladies weren't allowed on the floor of the exchange. It wasn't until 1967 that a woman owned a seat on the stock exchange.

2) Woodhull was said to be the first woman to own a newspaper when she was really one of a number of women over the centuries who owned, edited, or published a newspaper. In 1762 the sister-in-law of Benjamin Franklin became the first female editor and publisher of a newspaper in the U.S. when her husband died and she took over his business. Before Woodhull founded the Woodhull & Claflin's Weekly, Susan B. Anthony was proprietor of a newspaper called "The Revolution." The Weekly was also preceded by Lucy Stone's "Woman's Journal." What is noteworthy about the Weekly is that its peak subscription list was said to be about 40,000 while Anthony's paper had at most 3,000 subscribers.

3) Woodhull was said to be the first woman to speak before Congress. The first woman to speak before Congress was actually Anna Dickinson on the topic of slavery in 1864. Woodhull wasn't even the first to speak to Congress on the topic of suffrage. Elizabeth Cady Stanton spoke to the House and Senate District Committees on the topic of suffrage in Washington DC in 1870. Woodhull was the first woman to speak before the House Judiciary Committee in 1871.

4) Woodhull worked as a child preacher. There's no evidence for that as far I know. While she was a child she did play at preaching on top of an Indian Mound in Homer, Ohio, but it was child's play not work. It was her sister Tennessee Claflin who worked as a child beginning at the age of 11 when Woodhull was already married and around 18 years old.

5) She was the seventh of 10 children. She was actually the sixth.

6) It was Tennessee not Victoria who said "Tomato soup for three."

Of course many of these errors didn't originate with the author. Krull relied on the accuracy of the works of others. Perhaps this book would best be used to teach children the importance of double checking one's sources and not accepting everything as fact that appears in print.

As for S. Billett's review, if someone expects perfection in their heroes, they are bound to be disappointed and end up with no heroes at all. There are no perfect humans and hence no perfect heroes. Eugenics was once a popular science that came into disrepute decades after Woodhull's death. While most eugenicists believed racial mixing let to a degradation of the human race, there were a minority of eugenicists like Woodhull who believed that racial mixing led to an improvement of the human race through hybrid vigor. Woodhull was one of the least racist people in her era. If her words on race are objectionable today, it demonstrates how prevalent scientific racism was in the past and how much racial ideas have improved since her time.
Tygrarad
This book portrays Woodhull as a hero, but she was a racist and embraced FORCED STERILIZATION. She advocated for the malevolent position of eugenics. You can read her own words in the book *Free Lover: Sex, Marriage And Eugenics in the Early Speeches of Victoria Woodhull*. According to Amazon.com, "Her speeches and writings laid the eugenic foundation for the forced sterilization laws passed in over thirty states from 1907 on. When the U.S. Supreme Court declared such laws constitutional in 1927...."

DO NOT BUY THIS BOOK. SHE WAS NOT A HERO! Don't lie to the children.
Anarahuginn
A little context may help with appreciation of “A Woman for President.”

New Hampshire ratified the new Constitution of the United States on 21 June 1788. That made the Constitution the law of the land. The new federal government actually began on 4 March 1789.

From 1789 through 2016, no election for President has been crazier than that in 1872. The male voters of the United States cast 6.5 million ballots in 37 states. There was at least one female voter, Susan B. Anthony, who voted in Rochester, New York and was later fined $100 for that act.

In this crazy election Ms. Anthony had plenty of options, with eight men and one woman campaigning for the office of President. Ultimately the incumbent, Ulysses S. Grant, was reelected. The second place finisher, Horace Greeley, won 66 electoral votes but died just 24 days after the election. When the Electoral College met, the late Mr. Greeley still received three votes (which were then nullified). In all, six different candidates earned electoral votes. You can find all this on Wikipedia under “United States presidential election, 1872,” but you won’t see Victoria Woodhull listed. Wikipedia does not mention her on that page.

The Fifteenth Amendment to the Constitution, effective 1870, made the election of 1872 the first in which all African American citizens could vote. It was not until 1920 that the Nineteenth Amendment clarified that gender was not a bar to voting.

So how could Victoria Woodhull run for president in 1872 as the candidate of the Equal Rights Party? Well, the eligibility criteria in Article 2, Section 1 of the Constitution did not specify gender, so Ms. Woodhull was eligible. Ironically she was one year too young to be eligible, since she was not yet 35—but she ran anyway.

A Woman for President was first published in 2004. For perspective, that was twenty years after Geraldine Ferraro ran for Vice President beside Walter Mondale, four years before Sarah Palin was on the ticket for Vice President with John McCain, and twelve years before Hillary Clinton became the first woman nominated by a major party as their candidate for President.

Now, what of the book itself?

The illustrations by Jane Dyer are exceptionally beautiful, lushly colored, and convey a sense of history. They are easy on the eyes. They are sufficiently complex to respect children in eighth grade. I enjoyed them.

Kathleen Krull packs over 2,200 words in this 32-page book. Her text reads easily. The word count may seem generous for a book intended for children of grades 1 through 8, but this is not a simple subject. Victoria Woodhull was talented, multi-faceted, controversial, and human. I felt the text told a complex tale fully and smoothly.

How many votes were cast for Victoria Woodhull? I still don’t know. Even Wikipedia does not have that detail.

It is a great puzzlement that this book today ranks below 150,000 on the Amazon Best Sellers list, even while Hillary Clinton campaigns actively for President. Even more puzzling, I am posting the THIRD review of this book. What does it say that only two other Amazon reviewers have commented on this book in the last twelve years? Each reader may take their own conclusion—after they read this excellent book.

I’m posting this review because I feel the author and illustrator did a very fine job with a story that should be more widely known. I hope you find this helpful.