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ISBN:1590787080
Author: Jacqueline Houtman
ISBN13: 978-1590787083
Title: The Reinvention of Edison Thomas
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ePUB size: 1417 kb
FB2 size: 1830 kb
DJVU size: 1248 kb
Language: English
Category: Growing Up and Facts of Life
Publisher: Boyds Mills Press (March 1, 2010)
Pages: 192

The Reinvention of Edison Thomas by Jacqueline Houtman



Jacqueline Houtman's debut novel is about Edison "Eddy" Thomas, a middle school student, who loves to tinker with inventions but struggles to understand innuendos of those around him. The story opens with Eddy, as he prefers to be called, at his school's science fair. Quickly, the reader learns that Eddy is not your typical middle schooler. He knows the scientific names of what seems like everything as well as recites the elements on the periodic table to calm himself. Each chapter also contains Jacqueline Houtman's debut novel is about Edison "Eddy" Thomas,. I loved this book! I thought the whole storyline, plot and concept of The Reinvention of Edison Thomas was genius! I couldn't put this book down. I kept getting in trouble because I wouldn't do my chores.

by Jacqueline Houtman. Publication date 2010. Topics Middle school students, Middle schools, Boys, Science, Juvenile fiction, Fiction, Realistic fiction, Social acceptance, Boy inventors, Inventions, Schools, Friendship, Inventors. Publisher Front Street. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Kahle/Austin Foundation. Contributor Internet Archive.

Eddy Thomas can read a college physics book, but he can't read the emotions on the faces of his classmates. He can spend hours tinkering with an invention, but he can't stand more than a few minutes in a noisy crowd, like the crowd at the science fair, which Eddy fails to win. When the local school crossing guard is laid off, Eddy is haunted by thoughts of the potentially disastrous consequences and invents a traffic-calming device, using parts he has scavenged from discarded machines. You're getting the VIP treatment! With the purchase of Kobo VIP Membership, you're getting 10% off and 2x Kobo Super Points on eligible items. Your Shopping Cart is empty. There are currently no items in your Shopping Cart.

The Reinvention of Edison. has been added to your Cart. I'm not the target audience for this book and I don't have children, but I would think this would be a great book to read with a child and have a set of encyclopedias nearby to further investigate all the things that are sure to peak their curiosity. Reading The Reinvention of Edison Thomas with a child would also be a good way to bring up bullying and how to treat people who may act or look different than ourselves.

I found this book to be very realistic. As a middle school teacher I run across people like Mitch and Edison. It has been my pleasure to work the few autistic kids that have crossed my path. They have taught me so much. Edison falls for his pranks until a brainy geek befriends him and sets him straight about the bully. Despite his tactlessness, Edison makes two other friends who seem to appreciate his quirkiness and in the end, he finally recognizes what he has and appreciates his friends. This book was a quick, fun read. Middle school student Eddy Thomas loves science and inventing, but has trouble with people. Finally he meets some friends who appreciate his abilities and respect his unique view of the world. With their help can he rethink his definition of success. more).

Perhaps you can help. 1. National Governors Association for Best Practices and Council of Chief State School Officers.

The Reinvention of Edison Thomas by Jacqueline Houtman Science comes easily to Eddy (Edison) Thomas. The Reinvention of Edison Thomas is this summer's first book club pick at the Minocqua Public Library. Minocqua Public Library Information, Inspiration and Imagination. Published by Front Street, 2010 189 pages ISBN: 978-1-59078-708-3. Ages 9 - 13. When Eddy (Edison) Thomas learns that the crossing guard near his school is being eliminated, he about the potential dangers for younger children. Although his recent third-place finish in the school science fair left him deeply disappointed, Eddy decides to apply his interest in and aptitude for science and inventing to the problem of the unsafe intersection. Meanwhile, he’s trying to navigate the social maze of middle school.

Eddy Thomas can read a college physics book, but he can't read the emotions on the faces of his classmates at Drayton Middle School. He can spend hours tinkering with an invention, but he can't stand more than a few minutes in a noisy crowd, like the crowd at the science fair, which Eddy fails to win. When the local school crossing guard is laid off, Eddy is haunted by thoughts of the potentially disastrous consequences and invents a traffic-calming device, using parts he has scavenged from discarded machines. Eddy also discovers new friends, who appreciate his abilities and respect his unique view of the world. They help Eddy realize that his "friend" Mitch is the person behind the progressively more distressing things that happed to Eddy. By trusting his real friends and accepting their help, Eddy uses his talents to help others and rethinks his purely mechanical definition of success in this Tofte/Wright Children's Literature Award winner.
Reviews: 7
Vizuru
Middle grader Eddy Thomas is a science geek and inventor. He likes to dumpster dive for spare parts to make these inventions. His favorite band is They Might Be Giants because their lyrics incorporate actual science. He doesn't like people touching him and he hates loud noises. He recites the Periodic Table of Elements whenever he feels himself getting scared or anxious about anything. Some might call the kid "quirky". His uniqueness ends up making him a target for a lot of bullying. Surprisingly, the bulk of the tormenting comes from Mitch, who was once good friends with Eddy when they were just a few years old. But as they got older, Mitch seemed to put more value on being considered popular than a good friend. Strange thing is, everyone sees Mitch's behavior towards Eddy for what it is except Eddy himself.

While I don't think it's said outright, the descriptions of Eddy's behavior suggest that he likely has Asperger's Syndrome. He admits that reading facial expressions is incredibly difficult for him and sarcasm is usually lost on him. He instinctively wants to take everything at face value, so he can't understand why Mitch could wish ill-will towards him when they've known each other so long. What else can they be except friends? But over the course of the story, Eddy develops new friendships with people who show him what true, healthy friendships should consist of.

This story is geared toward the middle-grade reading age and while it might not be the cup of tea of any reader of that age, I think it will highly appeal to those who love science, trivia, fun facts, that kind of thing. The scenes in this novel are broken up by facts from Eddy's memory, which he cutely refers to as his RAM or Random Access Memory (computer joke /reference). I personally really enjoyed Eddy's sense of humor. Though Eddy says he doesn't "get" sarcasm, he's actually pretty good at self-deprecation!

One of the moments that cracked me up most was when Eddy was working on a history assignment where he was asked to write a biographical essay on an important historical figure. Well, nearly everyone in Eddy's family is named after famous Thomas's and as you might have guessed, Eddy's namesake is none other than the inventor Thomas Edison. While Eddy initially prefers to choose someone else to write about, time crunch concerns cause him to go with the easy pick. As he reads about Edison though, he finds he and his namesake actually had a good bit in common. What unsettles him is Edison's propensity for fires unexpectedly starting around his work. Eddy makes the observation that for a guy who accidentally started so many fires, it's a wonder he was not the inventor of smoke detectors or fire extinguishers!

While I couldn't help but cringe at the bullying traps Eddy unwittingly walks into, I had to cheer when he comes to a point of embracing who he is, quirks and all. It's beautiful when anyone of any age gets to have that moment in life! :-)
Tebei
The Reinvention of Edison Thomas is an original, and intelligent story that could be applied to any number of situations in a child's life. Edison (Eddy) is living with a condition similar to autism spectrum disorder (his condition is never given a specific name in the book) and he has problems interacting with other people. Eddy sees things in black and white so he has problems reading into the subtleties of conversation that we all take for granted and often misinterprets peoples meanings. He gets overwhelmed by loud noises and crowds and finds solace in his basement working on his inventions.
Eddy believes that his only friend is Mitch, a boy he has known forever, but when bad things start happening to Eddy and he starts getting in trouble in school, he has to consider that Mitch may be the one behind it. As he tries to come to terms with finding out Mitch is not only not his friend but a bully, he also has to learn to make and trust new friends.
I loved how Houtman wrote Eddy. He could have come off as aloof or like an after school special where you feel pity for him, but you don't. He's just a boy going through the things that most of us do in middle school, albeit from a very different perspective.
Eddy thinks in RAM - random access memory. His brain is filled with random scientific facts that help him process the world around him. For example after a a drop of rain lands on his watch he thinks: "Fact number 212 from the Random Access Memory of Edison Thomas: Petricho, the distinctive smell of rain on dry ground, is caused by plant oils release into the air from clay-based rocks and soil. Conducting his experiments and making his inventions help to calm him and are much simpler than interacting with people.
These random thoughts are throughout the book and this is where book's strength lies - it doesn't talk down to its audience. It assumes that kids are curious and receptive to new information. I'm not the target audience for this book and I don't have children, but I would think this would be a great book to read with a child and have a set of encyclopedias nearby to further investigate all the things that are sure to peak their curiosity.
Reading The Reinvention of Edison Thomas with a child would also be a good way to bring up bullying and how to treat people who may act or look different than ourselves. There are some very positive messages in this book as Eddy learns to trust the right people and work with others towards a common goal.
I was never a strong science student either but this book introduces science in a fun way. The appendix is filled with "not so random numbers" 1.7kg = average weight of an adult male duck-billed platypus, 44 pounds = weight of the largest lobster on record, 73atm = minimum supercritical pressure of carbon dioxide (above 31.1C)
Loved: Very original story that was straight forward and not overly sentimental, also enjoyed his friends Justin, Terry and Kip
Nitpick: I felt it ended rather abrubptly. The story has a satisfying ending but I guess I wanted more detail. Maybe there will be more adventures for Eddy and friends?

Rating: 3.5 out of 4 Probably better for younger readers (it is recomended for ages 9-12) Smart and filled with lessons kids won't even know their learning!
sergant
When I found I was to be on a WISCON panel with the book's author, I elected to read it, expecting little more than mild entertainment. WHAT A SUPRISE! I enjoyed the book immensely because:
The protagonist learns a great life lesson.
There is social discomfort but no real brutality.
The characters remained true to their basic selves (both the good guys and the bad ones).
The science facts were interwoven and consistently fascinating.
The book never had a trite moment.
BRAVO Jacqueline Hautman, I can't wait to read other works by you!
Pedar
The kid in me was fully present as I read THE REINVENTON OF EDISON THOMAS. Some things you never forget -- being targeted for being smart or discovering that "all the other kids" are aware of some kind of culture that doesn't match yours. So as I read, I cheered for every discovery that Eddy made toward having his own friends and being liked for who he is. I'm going to need a lot of copies of this book, to give to the "different" kids in my life, but also to the adults who still remember and who will love this well-told tale, too.
Xurad
The only disappointing aspect of this book was that I couldn't put it down, so I stayed up far too late. The Reinvention of Edison Thomas is a compelling, affirming read. It balances complex language and clear scientific understanding against a worried, obtuse view of people to show the world through the eyes of a boy living with high functioning autism/Asperger's. You see his world as he does, and are worried for him during clashes with bullies and thrilled for his social breakthroughs. The adroit portrayal of his perspective not only brought home how much the world differs based on what you perceive, and the impacts that has, but how that defines both what is important to you and where your triumphs occur. Highly recommended.