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ISBN:0613144309
Author: Susan Collidge
ISBN13: 978-0613144308
Title: What Katy Did (Wordsworth Collection)
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ePUB size: 1342 kb
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Language: English
Category: Classics
Publisher: Rebound by Sagebrush (May 1998)

What Katy Did (Wordsworth Collection) by Susan Collidge



Katy's name was Katy Carr. Katy was the longest girl that was everseen. What she did to make herself grow so, nobody could tell; but thereshe was-up above Papa's ear, and half a head taller than poor AuntIzzie. Whenever she stopped to think about her height she became veryawkward, and felt as if she were all legs and elbows, and angles andjoints. Happily, her head was so full of other things, of plans andschemes, and fancies of all sorts, that she didn't often take time toremember how tall she was.

Are you sure you want to remove What Katy Did (Wordsworth Collection) from your list? What Katy Did (Wordsworth Collection). Published October 1999 by Rebound by Sagebrush.

Those who enjoy Jodie will turn with interest to Laurel Lefkow's spirited reading of Susan Coolidge's What Katy Did, not only because of the heroines' similarities, but because it opens such a vivid window into a domestic world that we have lost: full of aunts and cousins, innumerable siblings and clearly drawn moralities.

What Katy Did is a children’s book written by Susan Coolidge, the pen name of Sarah Chauncey Woolsey, which was published in 1872. It follows the adventures of a twelve-year-old American girl, Katy Carr, and her family who live in the fictional lakeside Ohio town of Burnet in the 1860s. Katy is a tall untidy tomboy, forever getting into scrapes but wishing to be beautiful and beloved. When a terrible accident makes her an invalid, her illness and four-year recovery gradually teach her to be as good and kind as she has always wanted. What katy DID. Chapter I. Chapter II.

Wordsworth Collection. By (author) Susan Coolidge. Katy Carr is untidy, tall and gangling and lives with her brothers and sisters planning for the day when she will be "beautiful and beloved, and amiable as an angel". An accidental fall from a swing seems to threaten her hopes for the future, but Katy struggles to overcome her difficulties with pluck, vitality and good humour.

April 2018 : Hardback.

by Coolidge, Susan, 1835-1905. Publication date 2001. Topics Classic fiction, General, Juvenile Fiction, Children's 4-8 - Fiction - General, Children: Grades 4-6, Classics, Teenage girls. Publisher Ware, Hertfordshire : Wordsworth Classics. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. What Katy did at school - What Katy did next. What Katy Did at School" and "What Katy Did Next" continue the story of the rebellious American girl, Katy Carr and her family

Doggy and Pussy Tales Plus Ten Other Books. Anne of Green Gables Collection 6 Books Box Set by L. M. Montgomery (Anne of Green Gables, Anne of Avonlea, Anne of the Island, Anne of Windy Poplars, Annes house of Dreams, Anne of Ingleside). Lucy Maud Montgomery. Complete Anne of Green Gables Books - Complete Works of L. Montgomery.

Author Susan Coolidge. Producer Wordsworth Classics.

While several of Coolidge's works were well-liked and often reprinted, none survived as long as the 'Katy books' - What Katy Did or What Katy did at Home (1872), What Katy Did at School (1873), What Katy Did Next (1886), Clover (1886), and In the High Valley (1890), which were very popular in the United States through the 1920s and are. still popular in Great Britain. Titles by susan coolidge.

Reviews: 7
Goktilar
This was a childhood favourite, and I was thrilled to find this copy on Kindle. Warm, nostalgic, funny and inspiring, Katy's story is an excellent choice for anyone who loves Anne of Green Gables, Little Women, or Laura of the Little House.
In the beginning, Katy is really, really naughty, in an impulsive endearing way - clumsy, inspired and heedless of consequences. While the first few escapades end with a few tears and bruises, she finally does some real damage - choosing to ignore her aunt's orders not to play on the new swing. She falls, and "bruises her spine", so she is unable to walk. Her father, a doctor, sees no option but to leave her in her bedroom and hope for the best. Katy is shattered, and confines herself in the dark, crying constantly, until a wise cousin sets her on the right path.
The author, Susan Coolidge drew on her own childhood when her publisher asked her to write a comparable story to the current best-seller Little Women. Personally, I prefer Katy and her siblings, because there are no dark undertones and being good does not involve painful sacrifice or submerging your true personality. It looks like a wholesome healthy childhood with plenty of loving guidance. I can't see Katy's father telling the children to give away their Christmas breakfast! The book is humorous and light-hearted, and the moral is not too heavy handed, because Katy really doesn't have a choice about being less impulsive and more patient. The family dynamics are true to life, sensitive and funny. Your heart will break for poor sensitive little Elsie who doesn't belong with the older or the younger group of children and always feels left out.
There are also a few interesting historical insights: once Katy is injured, she is stuck in her room with no options to go outdoors, and no physiotherapy to keep her muscles from wasting. Also, the story is set in Ohio, yet Katy's family are "Westerners" which puzzled me (I'm not from the US!) Later in the series, when Katy's sister goes to Colorado, they start referring to themselves as "Easterners", so there is some insight into the growth of America during the 19th century.
In comparison to the other classics, Katy also has the most delicious food than any other 19th children's heroine. While the other books make the food SOUND delicious, I've always privately wondered if I'd want to eat with Laura or Jo or Anne. But Katy's meals are tempting and delectable.
Some commenters have complained about the format of this Kindle version - it must have been corrected since then, as my version was well laid out, easy to navigate and with no discernible errors.
Inerrace
I think 40 years must have passed since I last read What Katy Did. As a child I read it several times, and although not tall like Katy, in many other ways, being the eldest, a bit of a story teller, and often trying so hard to be good but often failing, I felt I WAS Katy. Reading it now as an adult I can see the strong moral overtones that underlay the story... virtues of patience, tolerance and kindness, that I half realised were in the story, but as a young reader, I think I glossed over in my race to see what would happen to Katy.
I would not recommend this to any younger readers who have not developed reading stamina, but there are still some romantic young souls out there who will also fall under Katy's spell. For adults out there who want to revisit Katy... do it, it may surprise you how much you have forgotten!
Mightsinger
I would not deign to malign a childhood classic such as this. I enjoyed it in my childhood and I recently enjoyed it again. It is possibly a little Olde Worlde for the kids of today but avid readers will still get pleasure from this series. This era of writing has passed and I think the world is poorer for it.
unmasked
I have to say that I found out this was a children's book AFTER I started reading it. I simply downloaded it because it was free and sounded interesting and I had no idea what is was about or when it was written. After finishing the book, it's hard to believe that it was meant to be a children's book. It's over one hundred years old and today's children would find it a very hard read, I would think. However, after it finally got moving, it has become one of my favorite books. I did not tear up at all while reading this book...except for the sad parts...and the parts where I was proud of Katy. There seemed to be a good many of those. I hope to read it with my daughter soon. Also, I found it funny how my conversational speech improved each time I put the book down. Good stuff.
Kazigrel
In my youth I avidly read the entire Katy series. In a spell of nostalgia I reread the series and..... loved every one of the stories yet again. I have no hesitation in saying that the joy of reading books wherein I have no fear of cuss words OR any sexual activities leaves me in a euphoria of contentment. These books are undeniably educational and have the added bliss of being beautifully written. Ah for a return of innocence and delight in the striving for true goodness.
Naa
Putting my mind back to the child I was when I first read this, even though I recently purchased it again from Amazon. These Katy Did stories were the original positive mental attitude training ground and helped for my attitudes in early childhood.

I never forgot the message these books gave me. I might have forgotten most of the story but I never forgot - what Katy did and how she triumphed though her strong positive attitude. This was a classic when I was young and I'm sure it would stand the test of time today.
Anarahuginn
This book took me back to my childhood and the first time I read the Katy Did books. They were among my favorite books and reading this one was an exercise in nostalgia--a pleasurable one. I would recommend that you read the first book, What Katy Did, first if you have not already read it. I also recommend all three of the Katy Did books to girls age ten and up. The characters are well drawn and the prose is easy to follow without being condescending. In short, I highly recommend this book.
I'm usually a fan of classic children's literature, and I've thoroughly enjoyed many other Puffin Classics, but What Katy Did was just okay. The moral of the story is a bit heavy handed, and Katy, although cute, is hardly one of those wonderfully charming and charismatic characters that will stay with you forever (like Anne of Green Gables or Jo from Little Women). If you like this genre, What Katy Did is worth reading, but it probably won't win a permanent place on your shelf.