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ISBN:0615484069
Author: Frank Slootman
ISBN13: 978-0615484068
Title: TAPE SUCKS: Inside Data Domain, A Silicon Valley Growth Story
Format: mobi txt lit azw
ePUB size: 1486 kb
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Language: English
Category: Small Business and Entrepreneurship
Publisher: Together Editing (May 13, 2011)
Pages: 110

TAPE SUCKS: Inside Data Domain, A Silicon Valley Growth Story by Frank Slootman



Frank Slootman served as President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) from mid-2003 through the acquisition of the company in the summer of 2009. Prior to Data Domain, Frank held executive technology management roles at Borland and Compuware Corporation. A native from The Netherlands, Frank started his career with Burroughs Corporation in Detroit. Today, Frank is the Chief Executive Officer of Service-now.

Why do customers and new recruits take a chance on a risky new player? Frank Slootman, who lived and breathed the Data Domain story for six years, offers up his clear-eyed, first-person shooter version of events. You’re with him on the inside as he and his team navigate the tricky waters of launching a high-technology business. You’ll feel-deep in your gut-the looming threat of outside combatants and the array of challenges that make mere survival an accomplishment. You’ll catch a glimpse of an adrenalin-fueled place where victories are visceral, communication wide open, and esprit de corps.

Former CEO Frank Slootman published a book about his experiences working at this company in 2011. Development of the Dell EMC Data Domain product line continues at Dell EMC. References. "Data Domain, an EMC company. "Data Domain boosts de-duplication performance". Frank Slootman (2011). Tape Sucks: Inside Data Domain, a Silicon Valley Growth Story.

So it is with that backdrop that I read Frank Slootman’s Tape Sucks: Inside Data Domain, A Silicon Valley Growth Story. A short and enjoyable book, I managed to finish it before we took off from Anatalia. Across one hundred pages, Frank dispenses immensely useful advice on the process of building a startup. One of the main points there, is how to treat your customers. I’ve written about this recently here - how we should embed ourselves with our customers, as well as make sure we make their lives better - and believe this is true in all my heart.

Silicon Valley has a knack for creating billion-dollar breakout companies. He then sold the company to EMC Corp. His next gig is the CEO spot at ServiceNow, which is in the red-hot cloud space. Just as a sign of the potential of this market, Apple's (Nasdaq:AAPL) CEO Tim Cook said the cloud represents the strategy for the next decade. In his book, Slootman gives an insider’s look at Data Domain. When he came on board, the company had no customers or revenues.

You can discover the most effective book TAPE SUCKS: Inside Data Domain, A Silicon Valley Growth Story, By Frank Slootman that is marketed in this globe. Not only had actually guides released from this country, but additionally the other countries. As we told recently, reading is not type of commitment task to do when we have to obligate. Checking out must be a practice, an excellent habit. About the Author Frank Slootman served as President and Chief Executive Officer (CEO) from mid-2003 through the acquisition of the company in the summer of 2009.

Former CEO Frank Slootman published a book about his experiences in 2011. Products and services. The first Data Domain system, the DD200 in 2004, had a . 5 TB addressable capacity and was able to accept data at a rate of 40 MB/sec. Because its implementation put most of the system stress on CPU/RAM, rather than disk I/O, it was able to improve at the rate of Intel technology. The New York Times Company.

Silicon Valley has been birthing renegade technology companies for the better part of a century, a storied lineage that traces from Stanford's Fred Terman to the Varian brothers' Klystron amplifier, from the hallowed garage of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard to the bold "traitorous eight" who fled Shockley Labs to form Fairchild Semiconductor.

CEO Frank Slootman has written the lessons of his years at the helm in his book "Tape Sucks: Inside Data Domain, a Silicon Valley Growth Story. Data Domain was founded by Kai Li, Ben Zhu, and Brian Biles. Chief Architect Hugo Patterson was hired 3 months after initial funding. The first product revenue was in the beginning of 2004

Silicon Valley has been birthing renegade technology companies for the better part of a century, a storied lineage that traces from Stanford’s Fred Terman to the Varian brothers’ Klystron amplifier, from the hallowed garage of Bill Hewlett and Dave Packard to the bold “traitorous eight” who fled Shockley Labs to form Fairchild Semiconductor. These companies, to be sure, broke new science and engineering ground—yet their most lasting legacy may well be their pioneering approach to business itself. They blazed a path that led to Intel, Apple, Oracle, Genentech, Gilead, Sun, Adobe, Cisco, Yahoo, eBay, Google, Salesforce, Facebook, Twitter, and many, many others. What causes a fledgling company to break through and prosper? At the highest level, the blueprint is always the same: An upstart team with outsized ambition somehow possesses an uncanny ability to surpass customer expectations, upend whole industries, and topple incumbents. But how do they do it? If only we could observe the behaviors of such a company from the inside. If only we were granted a first-person perspective at a present-day Silicon Valley startup-cum-blockbuster. What might we learn? This document—the story of Data Domain’s rise from zero to one billion dollars in revenue—is your invitation to find out. For anyone curious about the process of new business formation, Tape Sucks offers a provocative, ripped-from-the-headlines case study. How does a new company bootstrap itself? What role does venture capital play? Why do customers and new recruits take a chance on a risky new player? Frank Slootman, who lived and breathed the Data Domain story for six years, offers up his clear-eyed, “first-person shooter” version of events. You’re with him on the inside as he and his team navigate the tricky waters of launching a high-technology business. You’ll feel—deep in your gut—the looming threat of outside combatants and the array of challenges that make mere survival an accomplishment. You’ll catch a glimpse of an adrenalin-fueled place where victories are visceral, communication wide open, and esprit de corps palpable. The upshot is that the principles of the early entrepreneurs of Silicon Valley are alive and well. Their straightforward ideas include employee-ownership, tolerance for failure, unfettered meritocracy, faith in the power of technology breakthroughs, a preference for handshakes and trust over contracts and lawsuits, pragmatism, egalitarianism, and a belief in the primacy of growth and reinvestment over dividends and outbound profits. Tape Sucks is an honest, informed perspective on technology wave riding. It allows you to observe a high-growth business at close range and get an unvarnished picture of how things really work.
Reviews: 7
Kipabi
Frank Slootman's play by play account of the Data Domain acquisition, IPO, and general culture is not only eye opening but also entertaining.
TAPE SUCKS is the type of text you can read while on a quick flight or perhaps in a couple sittings. But I would suggest reading it twice as there are some gems interspersed throughout the book. The RECIPE approach to operations and customer service can be adapted to any organization and is a winning "recipe".
Perhaps you are an EMC or DD loyalist, hater, or you have never heard of either; TAPE SUCKS is still a fun book.
Check it out.
Irostamore
So my wife worked at DD and through her vignettes I was amazed at what Frank and the company did. Now seeing it through Frank's eyes I have a much deeper respect for what he and the company did (all the while juggling running chain saws) in an ever-changing environment anybody in the Silicon Valley high tech community is somewhat familiar. If you checked your ego at the door, you'll get immense value from this book. If you forgot to check your ego, the essence of the book will be lost on you. Really amazing.
NiceOne
Having had a successful startup, I found many similarities between DD and mine. There are absolutely interesting nuggets in this book that I would recommend entrepreneurs take to heart.
Gavikelv
I met the author of this book at a CEO roundtable meeting. These meetings are quite effective, since there are only some 15 to 25 participants present, along with a moderator and a guest. Frank sat right across from me at the table, and I was thoroughly impressed with his no-nonsense approach to business and his candid, quick wit.

The told the group that he had written a "small book" about his experience at Data Domain, the backup company that got its name by the slogan "Tape Sucks" in the mid 2000s. He took over as CEO in 2003, and the company was doing over $1 billion in business a year when it was sold to EMC, their arch competitor, in 2009.

Obviously, Data Domain is a great technology success story, and his book, Tape Sucks, tells the story, from beginning to end. He writes like he speaks, minus the Dutch accent. The book is a quick read and full of nuggets of wisdom from a guy who has been there.

The audience for the book are:
*Current CEOs of startups
*CEOs of companies that want to grow from 20 people to 1000
*Entrepreneurs that want to start a technology company of any type

I enjoyed this book thoroughly and I found myself nodding all the way through.

Now, if I only remember all the tips as I go through my workdays.
Leceri
This book is awful. There is nothing useful in this book for someone looking to start or grow a business. The book doesn't describe anything of value to an entrepreneur. I have no idea why the author wrote this. It's embarrassing. The only thing Frank Slootman proves in writing this book is that he's a salesman to the core, one of those gruff, confrontational, in your face salesmen. The man thrives in competitive sales contest, but not in competitive writing contests.
The two standards in the high tech entrepreneur genre have nothing to worry about. Slootman's book will be out of print in a year.
Startup: A Silicon Valley Adventure
High Stakes, No Prisoners: A Winner's Tale of Greed and Glory in the Internet Wars
Ffel
I had never heard of Data Domain, before a project that recently came up at work.
I did some internet research and found this book. I was looking for more of how this company's idea came into creation and how did Frank become the CEO. More information of the technological challenges that the company overcame in order to get their product to market. Frank says in the foreword of this book `Why write this ? " I find myself repeating my observations and wanted to produce a text that is better articulated than my always off the cuff commentaries" That is what you get here. Observations about the corporate culture and the business in general. No specifics.
Nightscar
This book concisely describes the history, explosive growth, and eventual sale of Data Domain, as viewed through the unique lens of Frank Slootman. As an employee of Data Domain through much of this period, I found that the book reads a lot like how Frank actually came across in real life; energetic, lively and full of drive.

Its a short book, with chapters often only a few pages long. It manages to say what it needs though, no more and no less. I read it in a couple sittings. Recommended for folk.
Frank recounts an amazing success story whose foundation involve basic principles that when considered, seem self-evident and obscenely obvious. Silicon Valley overflows with well pedigreed startup mentalities with huge egos and agendas that can easily defocus and lead to failure, but Frank lays out principles that any startup can grasp and apply immediately. Data Domain was not an overnight success but in a relatively short time you can learn the common sense secrets of a true Silicon Valley Legend. I had the privilege of working with Frank during his Borland years and much of what he wrote was very visible in the success of Borland at the beginning of the decade.