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Download Niche Envy: Marketing Discrimination in the Digital Age (The MIT Press) epub book
ISBN:0262201658
Author: Joseph Turow
ISBN13: 978-0262201650
Title: Niche Envy: Marketing Discrimination in the Digital Age (The MIT Press)
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Language: English
Category: Marketing and Sales
Publisher: The MIT Press; 1 edition (August 4, 2006)
Pages: 240

Niche Envy: Marketing Discrimination in the Digital Age (The MIT Press) by Joseph Turow



In Niche Envy, Joseph Turow examines the emergence of databases as marketing tools and the implications this may have for media, advertising, and society. Marketing Discrimination in the Digital Age.

Joseph Turow, called by the New York Times "probably the reigning academic expert on media fragmentation," is Robert Lewis Shayon Professor and Associate Dean for Graduate Studies at the Annenberg School for Communication, University of Pennsylvania.

Personal Name: Turow, Joseph. Publication, Distribution, et. Cambridge, Mass. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Niche envy : marketing discrimination in the digital age, Joseph Turow.

Publication date 2006. Topics Consumer profiling, Market segmentation, Marketing. Publisher Cambridge, Mass.

Turow, a professor at the University of Pennsylvania's Annenberg School for Communication, looks back at the evolution of marketing through the 20th century, when the emergence of national brands, mass media and retail institutions like department stores led to the democratization of commerce. Today, he observes, an opposing trend is gathering steam: the drive toward "mass customization. With increasingly intrusive information technologies, retailers and manufacturers are segmenting customers, tailoring advertising and product offers to specific individuals and routinely using.

Curtis said: Wake up to find almost no milk left in the fridge  . In Niche Envy, Joseph Turow examines the emergence of databases as marketing tools and the implications this may have for media, advertising, and society. Hardcover, 225 pages. Published October 1st 2006 by Mit Press (first published 2006). Niche Envy: Marketing Discrimination in the Digital Age. ISBN. 0262201658 (ISBN13: 9780262201650).

The price we pay for the new strategies in database marketing that closely track desirable customers, offering them benefits in return for personal information. MIT Press Release Date: October 11, 2006. Download options: EPUB 2 (Adobe DRM). You can read this item using any of the following Kobo apps and devices: DESKTOP.

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The price we pay for the new strategies in database marketing that closely track desirable customers, offering them benefits in return for personal information.

We have all been to Web sites that welcome us by name, offering us discounts, deals, or special access to content. For the most part, it feels good to be wanted―to be valued as a customer. But if we thought about it, we might realize that we've paid for this special status by turning over personal information to a company's database. And we might wonder whether other customers get the same deals we get, or something even better. We might even feel stirrings of resentment toward customers more valued than we are. In Niche Envy, Joseph Turow examines the emergence of databases as marketing tools and the implications this may have for media, advertising, and society. If the new goal of marketing is to customize commercial announcements according to a buyer's preferences and spending history―or even by race, gender, and political opinions―what does this mean for the twentieth-century tradition of equal access to product information, and how does it affect civic life? Turow shows that these marketing techniques are not wholly new; they have roots in direct marketing and product placement, widely used decades ago and recently revived and reimagined by advertisers as part of "customer relationship management" (known popularly as CRM). He traces the transformation of marketing techniques online, on television, and in retail stores. And he describes public reaction against database marketing―pop-up blockers, spam filters, commercial-skipping video recorders, and other ad-evasion methods. Polls show that the public is nervous about giving up personal data. Meanwhile, companies try to persuade the most desirable customers to trust them with their information in return for benefits. Niche Envy tracks the marketing logic that got us to this uneasy impasse.

Reviews: 2
Uris
This product was in great shape, but I wasn't sure if it was the actual textbook I needed because it didn't have that design on the front cover like the picture portrays. Otherwise, it got here timely and I was satisfied.
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A provocative look at how the technologies of the Internet are being used as a testbed for the next generation of marketing messages, migrating away from the mass market model toward a model of market segmentation and discrimination. Building upon research that he and others have been conducting at UPenn's Annenberg Center, Turow describes how advertising has turned from mass promotion toward the strategies of direct marketing, product placement and public relations, enabled by new media and information technologies and justified by the industry's sense that these technologies have overly empowered the consumer to avoid their conventional messages. In the face of DVRs, remote controls, etc., marketers have decided that the tying of direct marketing messages to increasingly intrusive data collecting and mining methods is the wave of the future. Moreover, this is not an Internet-only problem. Turow points out that these technique are only being tested on the Internet; they are migrating to (digital) television and conventional retail outlets.

Turow suggests that all this really will lead to is a kind of deception death spiral --- consumers will lie about their personal information to gain access to marketing offers that they would otherwise not get (frequent flier programs, for example) while marketers will become increasingly intrusive as they seek the "truth" about their customers.

The book's weaknesses emerge in the closing chapter, where Turow tries to outline a set of policy objectives to remedy this problem. Unfortunately, his primary instruments are those of consumer education and media labeling; good ideas, but probably unworkable in this environment. The resolution of this problem lies deeper than just refining the mechanisms and instruments of marketing. We have to confront some of the fundamental inconsistencies in our notions of the role of media and information, and in our economic models for sustaining them.

Despite the weaknesses of his remedies, overall this is a vitally important look at what's going on "behind the curtain" of our evolving retail and media environments, and I highly recommend it.