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ISBN:0932633528
Author: Gerald M. Weinberg
ISBN13: 978-0932633521
Title: More Secrets of Consulting: The Consultant's Tool Kit
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ePUB size: 1698 kb
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Language: English
Category: Marketing and Sales
Publisher: Dorset House; 1st edition (December 15, 2001)
Pages: 216

More Secrets of Consulting: The Consultant's Tool Kit by Gerald M. Weinberg



In More Secrets of Consulting, Weinberg turns the gaze from the external and how a consultant can act into the internal and how one can improve themselves. As a result the book covers the toolkit that Weinberg believes all consultants should have. Some of these are the ability to say clearly yes and no, be courageous, curiosity and so on. While these traits are interesting to learn about but also think about it quickly becomes unorganized. The first book was great in that it focuses on what a consultant should know. This book doesn't really have a focus

More Secrets of Consulting book. Widely acclaimed as a consultant's consultant, Gerald . .Weinberg helps computer consultants identify and strengthen each aspect of their performance using a "consultant's tool kit" of seventeen memorable symbols.

Widely acclaimed as a consultant's consultant, Gerald M. Weinberg builds on his perennial best-seller The Secrets of Consulting with all-new laws, rules, and principles. You'll learn how to fight burnout, stay curious, understand your clients, negotiate effectively, and much, much more. Consultants need more than technical skills-they need self-awareness and a strong set of personal abilities.

More Secrets of Consulting - Gerald M. Weinberg. The Secrets of Consulting is far more than a consultant's handbook. It is actually a book about how people can take charge of their own growth. Hence the title, The Consultant's Tool Kit. Many of the other things that a consultant ought to know can be found in the books of Peter Block, who has certainly taught me a great deal. In an interview with Peter, Paula Jacobs asked: What do you see as the single most important life lesson for consultants?

Widely acclaimed as a consultant's consultant, Gerald M.

Widely acclaimed as a consultant's consultant, Gerald M. Weinberg helps computer consultants identify and strengthen each aspect of their performance using a "consultant's tool kit" of seventeen memorable symbols

Labels: consulting, feedback, ideas, interviewing, leadership, learning, listening, managing, problem solving, teams. Saturday, July 21, 2018. The final two chapters in the book were about a couple of sure-fire women’s jobs for the future (1900 was then the future). First chapter was about telegraph operators. The chapter proved that there was a great future for women because they could operate a telegraph key at least as fast as men (and the telephone had yet to be invented). Labels: congruence, consulting, leadership, listening, observation, personality, relationships, self-esteem, team-building.

My Notes on The Secrets of Consulting by Gerald M. Weinberg: The first law of consulting: In spite of what your client may tell you, theirs is always a problem. The second law of consulting: No matter how it looks at first, it’s always a people problem. Never promise more than 10% improvement (so the client doesn’t get embarrassed about how crap they were). If you happen to achieve more than 10% improvement, make sure it isn’t noticed. Whatever the client is doing, advise something else (because what they have been doing hasn’t worked so far)

Widely acclaimed as a consultant's consultant, Gerald M. Weinberg builds on his perennial best-seller The Secrets of Consulting with all-new laws, rules, and principles. You'll learn how to fight burnout, stay curious, understand your clients, negotiate effectively, and much, much more.

Consultants need more than technical skills—they need self-awareness and a strong set of personal abilities. Weinberg helps computer consultants identify and strengthen each aspect of their performance using a "consultant's tool kit" of seventeen memorable symbols. He devotes a chapter to each of these symbolic tools, from The Wisdom Box to The Fish-Eye Lens to The Oxygen Mask.

Reviews: 7
Gavirgas
Several years ago, I read the original Secrets of Consulting by the same author, Gerald Weinberg (see my review for that book). After reading some of the other reviews here for More Secrets of Consulting, I must say that I concur with much of the opinion written. The original Secrets is a classic work - there simply is no other consulting book in the marketplace of this genre, and not only is the information presented in that work very useful, it is very entertaining as well. Unlike the original Secrets, which presents a philosophy of consulting, More Secrets makes an attempt to present a number of consulting tools within tangible categories that consist of six self-esteem tools by family therapist Virginia Satir as well as another ten tools that Weinberg created himself. As a general rule, I like the tools that both Satir and Weinberg offer in this book. I like how Weinberg ties together the Wisdom Box and the Golden Key, for instance. Among my least favorite of the tools presented is the Courage Stick and the the Egg, the Carabiner, and the Feather. The last three of these least-favorites are presented hurriedly in one chapter, toward the end of the book, and I cannot help to wonder whether he was pressed for time as he began wrapping up his writing. The Courage Stick chapter is bizarre - Weinberg actually seems to be recommending to readers that they carry physical objects, apparently similar to good luck charms, to help individuals build up courage during the more difficult portions of consulting engagements. Strange. If the reader disregards these two chapters, however, they will find that many of the rules and principles which Gerald presents here are much in line with the original Secrets - not nearly as entertaining, but still worth reading. Some of my favorites are:

*Cary's Crap Caution: "Anything not worth doing is not worth doing right."
*The Mercenary Maxim: "One of the best ways to lose lots of money is to do something only for the money."
*Dani's Decider: "When you stop learning new things, it's time to move on."
*The Railroad Counter-Paradox: "When service is too good, the suppliers may never hear about it, and thus they drop the service."
*LeGuin's Law: "When action grows unprofitable, gather information. When information grows unprofitable, sleep."
*The Detective's Fourth Rule: "If you can't understand where the questions are coming from, they're probably coming from an agenda someone doesn't want you to know about."
*The Parallel Paradox: "If you're too much like your clients, you don't attract them; if you're too different, you frighten them away."
*Knaomi's Knowledge Knockout: "Experience is not just the best teacher, it's the only teacher. Experience may be the only teacher, but it doesn't necessarily teach anything."

Of course, many of the rules and principles are just Weinberg opinion. Immanuel Kant, the great German philosopher, for instance, said that "experience teaches nothing without theory, but theory without experience is mere intellectual play". Because I consider this book to be an extension to the original Secrets, I strongly recommend that these books be read in succession. Several other reviewers correctly note that Weinberg cites some of his other works in More Secrets. Although this can be seen as a bit of self-promotion (even a large portion of the bibliography for More Secrets consists of Weinberg writings), most of these citations are to the original Secrets because of the heavy tie between the two books, and I consider this facet of the book reasonable.
Otrytrerl
More secrets of consulting offers a portable toolkit for the working consultant. The approaches and viewpoints of consulting that Jerry teaches can be ported around along with the person and can go into building a personalized toolkit. Some of these techniques have very much become a part of my toolbox, becoming more effective every time I use it.

There aren't too many authors or books out there who are tackling the difficult inner game of consulting. Technical advice such as creating effective presentations are easy to put down on paper, but areas such as how a consultant tackles fear, how a consultant can tackle conflicting agenda's on the client side, effective negotiation, these are all the thorny topics that Jerry tackles with his "More secrets of consulting". I found the book unique and powerful because of that.

I initially thought this was "part 2" of Jerry's earlier book "Secrets of consulting" but this is a standalone book with tools etc that don't overlap, nor require the earlier book. In a way, this book is more condensed and in a more "how to guide" format than the earlier book, I enjoyed reading this book first followed by the Secrets of consulting.

Jerry has a unique voice and uses parables and stories to bring the point across, this allows him to speak with authority and get across, valuable advice on the areas not usually explored in other books including interpersonal skills and qualities such as courage and the ability to deal with conflicting motivations at the client end and on our end.

I would highly recommend this book for any working consultant who wants material beyond the tactics of "how to put together a presentation" or data analysis. It does requires a couple of readings of the book to parse through the meaning and interpret it in context - in this way, Jerry's exercises and approach to consulting are not really easy. Effective, very effective, but requires the consultant to put in his time and effort to master them.
Bort
More Secrets of Consulting by Gerald Weinberg is the followup to The Secrets of Consulting. Like its predecessor it is about the tricks of the trade of consulting.

In More Secrets of Consulting, Weinberg turns the gaze from the external and how a consultant can act into the internal and how one can improve themselves. As a result the book covers the toolkit that Weinberg believes all consultants should have. Some of these are the ability to say clearly yes and no, be courageous, curiosity and so on.
While these traits are interesting to learn about but also think about it quickly becomes unorganized. The first book was great in that it focuses on what a consultant should know. This book doesn't really have a focus. The greatest consulting advice are exactly the same as advice coming from the first book. The rest can be found anywhere else and spans very broadly.

The style is still pleasant but is more personal and this does save the book a little. Ultimately there's less content to get to in this book and reading The Secrets of Consulting is enough.