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Download Conducting the Java Job Interview: IT Manager Guide for Java with Interview Questions (IT Job Interview series) epub book
ISBN:0974435589
Author: Jeffrey M. Hunter,Don Burleson
ISBN13: 978-0974435589
Title: Conducting the Java Job Interview: IT Manager Guide for Java with Interview Questions (IT Job Interview series)
Format: lrf doc mobi docx
ePUB size: 1922 kb
FB2 size: 1853 kb
DJVU size: 1426 kb
Language: English
Category: Job Hunting and Careers
Publisher: Rampant Techpress (April 1, 2004)
Pages: 150

Conducting the Java Job Interview: IT Manager Guide for Java with Interview Questions (IT Job Interview series) by Jeffrey M. Hunter,Don Burleson



Series: IT Job Interview series (Book 4). Paperback: 150 pages. Publisher: Rampant Techpress (April 1, 2004). ISBN-13: 978-0974435589. Product Dimensions: 6 x . x 9 inches. Just like the title regarding the J2EE job interview, this book will help developers come up with quick answers and the proper vocabulary to sound proficient in a job interview, but it is not going to help you much in solving problems though software development questions. An excellent resource to brush up on your java terms.

Jeffrey M. Hunter is an Oracle Certified Professional, a Java Development Certified Professional, and is currently employed as a senior database administrator. He lives in Butler, Pennsylvania. IT Job Interview series.

Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. The only good thing about this book is the question bank in the later half. As someone coming from a top public school, as mentioned in the book actually, even I feel offended by its discriminating attitude in the first half. However, the first half about int The only good thing about this book is the question bank in the later half.

Offering accumulated observations of interviews with hundreds of job candidates, these books provide useful insights into which characteristics make a good IT professional. These handy guides each have a complete set of job interview questions and provide a practical method for accurately assessing the technical abilities of job candidates.

автор Don Burleson, Jeffrey M. Hunter. Book Description Offering accumulated observations of interviews with hundreds of job candidates, these books provide useful insights into which characteristics make a good IT professional. These handy guides each have a complete set of job interviewquestions and provide a practical method for accurately assessing the technical abilities of job candidates. The personality characteristics of successful IT professionals are listed and tips for identifying candidates with the right demeanor are included.

These handy guides each have a complete set of job interview questions and provide a practical method for accurately assessing the technical abilities of job candidates. Methods for evaluating academic and work histories are described as well. Library descriptions.

Conducting the Java job interview : IT manager guide for Java interview questions. Conducting the Java job interview : IT manager guide for Java interview questions. Java, J++. Языки программирования.

Conducting the Java Job Interview IT Manager Guide for Java with Interview Questions. PD 404. Shelving: Computer Certification.

Java, J2ee Interview Questions You'll Most Likely Be Asked (English). The Mammoth Book of Unexplained Phenomena: From bizarre biology to inexplicable astronomy (English).

Offering accumulated observations of interviews with hundreds of job candidates, these books provide useful insights into which characteristics make a good IT professional. These handy guides each have a complete set of job interview questions and provide a practical method for accurately assessing the technical abilities of job candidates. The personality characteristics of successful IT professionals are listed and tips for identifying candidates with the right demeanor are included. Methods for evaluating academic and work histories are described as well.
Reviews: 7
Qag
Just like the title regarding the J2EE job interview, this book will help developers come up with quick answers and the proper vocabulary to sound proficient in a job interview, but it is not going to help you much in solving problems though software development questions. An excellent resource to brush up on your java terms.
Goktilar
Attention Rampart Books: Please hire an editor!!

The questions were very helpful - not as finicky as the SCJP questions, but useful at determining a person's level of Java understanding. However, the answers contained a number of inaccuracies and errors. Example: p. 142, wrong signature for toString() is given; p. 143, "In this example, 22=4..." should be "Since 2 (superscript) 2 = 4...".

I would have given it four or even five stars had these problems not existed.
Xtreem
This is a good Starter book for Java interviews. There are some typos etc that authors should have attended to more. But if considered a starter book for Java interviews, this is a decent book. But rarely the interviews in real world are starters. But a useful handbook for quickly refreshing basic questions.
Skiletus
I stumbled upon this little gem while browsing around the bookstore earlier today, and was so stunned that I ended up reading the entire thing. Hilarious and horrifying in equal measure!

The book is basically divided into two parts. The first part allegedly describes the characteristics of good and bad job search candidates. The second part is a bank of questions and answers, intended to help a hiring manager with no subject-matter knowledge "wing it" through a technical interview. Alarm bells should be ringing already at this point!

FIRST SECTION: Much of the material is generic to the point of being boilerplate. You could replace all instances of "Java developer" with "Web designer" or "Database administrator" instead... and recycle the entire section to create other books (perhaps the author has done just that!). The boilerplate breaks down as follows:

(1) One-third of the advice is of a nature that shouldn't require being said (e.g. don't hire people who show signs of drug abuse, long gaps in a candidate's resume are a warning sign, etc).

(2) Another one-third consists of information that is just flat-out wrong. I got a particular laugh about "proper" Java developers wearing dark suits with conservative ties! I've been a Java developer in Fortune 500 companies for over a decade now, and I've only heard (secondhand!) of one or two companies where the I.T. developers wear ties. This is of course putting aside the author's obvious sexism... whereas I've never seen a Java developer in a suit and tie, apparently the author has never seen a Java developer with breasts.

(3) Speaking of breasts, the final one-third is bizarre stereotypes and creepy illustrations. There are cartoons of technical workers dressed in drag and sitting atop a stack of pornographic magazines, or sitting in a basement stuffing their faces with pizza... to illustrate the author's warnings about many Java developers being perverts or slobs. I'm not exactly sure what a hiring manager is supposed to do with this "information", but it certainly does reveal a lot about the author.

SECOND SECTION: As mentioned, the second part of the book is a question and answer bank. Other reviewers have already noted that QA was lacking, as there are typos and flaws in the questions.

(1) However, even if these questions had been competently edited, the premise of many questions is flawed. A large number of these questions are of an "academic" nature that never comes up in real-world business... getting it wrong shouldn't reflect poorly on a candidate, while getting it right wouldn't necessarily indicate qualification either.

(2) Taking a step further back, the premise of this entire *section* is flawed. If you have no personal familiarity with a branch of technical subject matter, you *should not* be conducting a technical interview involving that subject matter! Standard management practice is to have an appropriate technical resource conduct the initial screening. Managers just interview pre-screened candidates to select the best personality fit. If you are B.S.'ing your way through unfamiliar technical questions, how can you really tell whether a candidate is B.S.'ing his or her way through the answers? This book is woefully inadequate for such a purpose.

In sum: this is a lazy book, intended for rubes with zero I.T. management experience, written by an author who may or may not have any management experience himself (the back cover indicates that he's a DBA contractor). The author either has an active disdain for technical professionals, or he is deliberately writing that way out of an assumption that it's what his audience wants to hear. To the extent that there is any value in this book at all, it is for entry-level technical professionals to help prepare themselves for poor management traits they will occasionally run across in their careers. Well, that and the creepy cartoons!
Arryar
Either the author has no knowledge of java or has paid very little attention to quality on this book. Most of the questions are flawed. Looks like someone did a web search and compiled some questions together in this book.

Q46 says:

Will the following code snippet compile? Why or why not?

class A {

static void foo(int x){}

}

class B {

void foo(int x){}

}

The author claims that this code will not compile. Try it out it compiles fine. It is obvious that the author wanted to say "class B extends A" when he wrote this question, in which case, the answer makes sense.

This is just a small example of a series of flaws that book comes with. People who claim this book to be good are surely java-ignorant folks.

Each question is followed by a big empty lined writing space. The author/publisher's idea is to raise the book volume without providing enough material. The 289 page could fit in 50 pages on a regular print.

The book is not just misleading but also unfair to the smart candidate who gives the right answer, but is assumed to be incorrect by the recruiters who use this book.
Mr.mclav
There is something fishy about this book. Some of the answers given for proposed interview questions are just plain wrong. The description of the author says he has some kind of Java developer certification but it doesn't use the right terminology for the Sun Certified Java Developer(SCJD). If he had the SCJD then he would also have the Sun Certified Java Programmer certification but they don't mention that one. Hey author, what's your SCJD certification number so we can look it up?

At one point the author cautions against hiring anyone 60 years or older because if the company provides full retirement benefits at 70, the company would only get 10 years work before paying for a full pension. Is that blatantly discriminatory or what? No wonder it's tough to get a decent job if you're over 50!