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ISBN:1408812096
Author: Paul Gilding
ISBN13: 978-1408812099
Title: Great Disruption
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ePUB size: 1830 kb
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Language: English
Category: Economics
Publisher: Bloomsbury UK (April 1, 2011)
Pages: 304

Great Disruption by Paul Gilding



Paul Gilding’s book The Great Disruption was released around the world over 2011 to wide acclaim. A bracing assessment of the planetary crisis that we can no longer avoid-and the once-in-an-epoch chance it offers to build a better world. One of those who has been warning me of for a long time is Paul Gilding, the Australian environmental business expert

Independent writer & advisor on sustainability.

The 'Great Disruption' started in 2008, with spiking food and oil prices and dramatic ecological change like the melting polar icecap. It is not simply about fossil fuels and carbon footprints. We have come to the end of Economic Growth, Version ., a world economy based on consumption and waste, where we lived beyond the means of our planet's ecosystems and resources. The Great Disruption offers a stark and unflinching look at the challenge humanity faces - yet also a deeply optimistic message.

This Great Disruption started in 2008, with spiking food and oil prices and dramatic ecological changes, such as the melting ice caps. The Great Disruption offers a stark and unflinching look at the challenge humanity faces-yet also a deeply optimistic message. The coming decades will see loss, suffering, and conflict as our planetary overdraft is paid; however, they will also bring out the best humanity can offer: compassion, innovation, resilience, and adaptability. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. The Great Influenza.

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BOOK: The Great disruption, Bloomsbury Publishing Plc, London, 2011. AUTHOR: Paul Gilding – Is an Australian by birth who is an Advocate for sustainability, Head Greenpeace International, Consultant to major corporations, Member Cambridge University’s Programme or Sustainability Leadership, Blogger and runs newsletter the Cockatoo Chronicles. OVERVIEW: The author’s stated objective is to help alert us to the changes that are now inevitable as a result of the affects of human activity on the planet. The author makes the starting point for his book clear namely that as it is now too late to avoid the significant adverse affects of humanity induced climate change we should immediately start considering how we should deal with the likely problems.

Gilding, Paul, 1959-. An economic and social hurricane The scream : we are their children's children A very big problem Beyond the limits : the great disruption Addicted to growth Global foreshock : the year that growth stopped The road ahead : our planetary sat nav Are we finished? When the dam of denial breaks The one-degree war How an Austrian economist could save the world Creative destruction on steroids : out with the old, in with the new Shifting sands : from Middle Eastern oil to Chinese sun The elephant in the room : growth doesn't work The happiness economy Yes, there is life after shopping No,.

The Great Disruption book. Fantastic high-level book from former Greenpeace CEO and environmental consultant Paul Gilding. He directly addresses activist nihilism ("everything is fucked what's the point") at a time when I needed it. He's not optimistic in the "everything will work out fine" sense, but talks from direct experience figuring out what role he was going to play.

It's time to stop just worrying about climate change, says Paul Gilding. Instead we need to brace for impact, because global crisis is no longer avoidable. The `Great Disruption' started in 2008, with spiking food and oil prices and dramatic ecological change like the melting polar icecap. It is not simply about fossil fuels and carbon footprints. We have come to the end of Economic Growth, Version 1.0, a world economy based on consumption and waste, where we lived beyond the means of our planet's ecosystems and resources. The Great Disruption offers a stark and unflinching look at the challenge humanity faces - yet also a deeply optimistic message. The coming decades will see loss, suffering and conflict as our planetary overdraft is paid. However, they will also bring out the best humanity can offer: compassion, innovation, resilience and adaptability. Gilding tells us how to fight, and win, what he calls `the One Degree War' to prevent catastrophic warming of the earth, and how to start today. The crisis we are in represents a rare chance to replace our addiction to growth with an ethic of sustainability, and it's already happening. It's also an unmatched business opportunity: old industries will collapse while new companies literally reshape our economy. In the aftermath of the Great Disruption, we will measure `growth' in a new way. It will mean not quantity of stuff, but quality, and happiness, of life. And, yes, there is life after shopping. The Great Disruption is an invigorating and well-informed polemic by an advocate for sustainability and climate change who has dedicated his life to campaigning for a balanced use of Earth's limited resources. It is essential reading.
Reviews: 7
Xarcondre
By nature, I’m a doom n gloom kinda guy; just ask my friends. And Gilding’s book starts out that way; the picture he paints of the Earth’s near future isn’t a pretty one, not one bit. But it’s accurate, and there’s nothing we can do to stop the Great Disruption that he predicts.
Gilding draws upon the science of climate change to warn us, again, that the end of civilization ‘as we know it’ is upon us. The clues are all around us: economic crashes, unstable oil prices, depleted soil injected with poisons to produce cancerous food, revolutions, refugees, war, and an addiction with economic growth. It is this addiction, that in the end, will drive us over the cliff. Infinite growth is a mathematical impossibility in a world of finite resources. Consumerist-Capitalism is dead, and it’s time to bury it.

Gilding doesn’t just rely on the ‘science’ to make his case; even the ‘forefathers’ of our capitalist system, John Maynard Keynes, John Stuart Mill, and the man who arguably started it all, Adam Smith, all pointed to the end of growth and a time when we would exploit our resources beyond what they would supply. That time has come. To argue otherwise might make you feel better, but it won’t change the facts. The only real question left is, “What the hell do we do now?”

Luckily, Gilding isn’t just a doom n gloom kinda guy—neither am I, anymore—he’s actually an optimist. Gilding does NOT think we will slip into chaos. Gilding draws on the example of WWII, when freedom-loving peoples all over the world banded together to defeat the threat from fascist dictators. Even then, our grandparents and great-grandparents waited till it was almost too late, as we have done. But just like them, Gilding argues that when the crisis finally hits home, we will be moved to swift action to deal with the real dangers of climate change, and that during that process, we will find a way to build a better, more balanced, happier world.

If you want my opinion—and I’m sure you do since you’re reading this damned review—I think he’s dead on. We WILL wake up in time to save the Earth, and our place on it. How will that happen? Mostly, it will be the job of you and I, the little people of the planet, just like it was for the Greatest Generation, when Hitler came knockin’. Yes, our governments, and the business sector will play a major role in the early process, because they won’t have a choice; they’ll either get it done, or be replaced. But most of the work falls to us, the ordinary, average people of the world. Read the book! Then let’s get to work!
Buriwield
I'm not a climate change sceptic. I simply don't think this book is worth the money. The first half of the book is the better part. The author argues that climate change is now unavoidable, and that a major catastrophe will take place that will force people into action.

But he nevers says what is going to happen, and he provides absolutely no factual basis for his belief that it will take place within the next ten years. The other points he makes in the book are already common knowledge for people interested in the subject.

The second half of the book is farcical romp through alternative energy options that will save the survivors. Of course, he never critically examines whether any of these options are feasible (e.g., a solar panel in every yard). In fact, if he had read the sources he cites in the first half of the book (The Long Emergency and The Vanishing Face of Gaia) he would realize alternative energy will not save us.

This is not even pseudo-science. It's merely the musings of an environmental activists. Read the aforementioned books and skip this one.
Snake Rocking
Some of the reviews point out that there are two books in one here. And they are right except for the fact that the arguments used in the first part of the book are just flat out not very convincing. The first third is about the Great Disruption itself, that is, the logical consequences of the endless craving for growth and use of the finite natural resources of planet Earth. This idea hasn't been recognized as it should because the arguments being used are just not convincing. We have heard this before and the arguments used were wrong, but at least they were laid out effectively. Advice for the author, "IF you want to make an argument, make an argument, but make it with facts such as the number of incidents of impactful climactic events per geography, or explain more fully the notion of how the ocean is a buffer and how the factors in the ocean will react at different levels of certain variables. Make an argument that is convincing and the rest of this book will have some meaning."

If you are looking for a better view of changes in the environment and climate I would suggest reading Fred Pearce's book "With Speed and Violence". It is thoughtful and tackles the subject thoroughly rather than this weak attempt. The state of the art seems to be deep concern amongst researchers, but this problem is so large and so complex that researchers do not have solid representations in their models of how the system actually works and will react. What appears to be consistent, despite inadequate modeling capabilities, is that researchers are coming to the conclusion that climate change could be far more abrupt and impactful on human populations than anyone can currently fathom.

Because the first third of the great disruption is so weak, the rest of the book is a real struggle and reads as a waste of time. I would look elsewhere for thoughtful comments or reading on climate change.
Jonariara
Won't rehash the many other reviews. Suffice it to say it is a very readable, well-referenced treatment of the most critical issue that has ever faced humankind (and perhaps most life forms in general). While it focuses on the critical climate crisis, it also addresses the larger issue of why we have to transition from our current culture of perpetual growth/expansion to one focused on improving the quality of life through the acquisition and more rewarding use of time, and that this must happen if for no other reason than the physical limitations of the planet and its resources. The author lays out the basics of how he sees humankind moving forward, and although emphasizing the substantial hardships that lie ahead, is perhaps more optimistic than I that we will be up to the task. I have purchased several copies for family and friends to read--everyone should.