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ISBN:0786118385
Author: Nathaniel Branden,Robert Hessen,Anna Fields,Ayn Rand
ISBN13: 978-0786118380
Title: Capitalism : The Unknown Ideal (Library Edition)
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Language: English
Category: Economics
Publisher: Blackstone Audio, Inc.; Unabridged edition (October 1, 2000)

Capitalism : The Unknown Ideal (Library Edition) by Nathaniel Branden,Robert Hessen,Anna Fields,Ayn Rand



This is the view of Ayn Rand, a view so radically opposed to prevailing attitudes that it constitutes a major philosophic revolution. In this series of essays, she presents her stand on the persecution of big business, the causes of war, the default of conservatism, and the evils of altruism. Here is a challenging new look at modern society by one of the most provocative intellectuals on the American scene. Born February 2, 1905, Ayn Rand published her first novel, We the Living, in 1936. Anthem followed in 1938. It was with the publication of The Fountainhead (1943) and Atlas Shrugged (1957) that she achieved her spectacular success. Rand's unique philosophy, Objectivism, has gained a worldwide audience.

It was originally published in 1966.

This is the view of Ayn Rand, a view so radically opposed to prevailing attitudes that it constitutes a major philosophic revolution.

by. Ayn Rand (Author). Find all the books, read about the author, and more. Are you an author? Learn about Author Central. Rand’s unique philosophy, Objectivism, has gained a worldwide audience. Rand helps understand why it is better than any other. I believe that she also understood the need for government and implicit in that is "a mixed economy.

By Ayn Rand, Nathaniel Branden, Alan Greenspan and Robert Hessen. By Ayn Rand, Nathaniel Branden, Alan Greenspan and Robert Hessen. Category: Philosophy Politics. In this series of essays, Ayn Rand presents her stand on the persecution of big business, the causes of war, the default of conservatism, and the evils of altruism. This is the view of Ayn Rand, a view so radically opposed to prevailing attitudes that it constitutes a major philosophic revolution.

Ayn Rand, Nathaniel Branden, Alan Greenspan, Robert Hessen. Titlepage is an image, not text (also used as the cover; why?). Yay?) 10 September 2016 (06:29).

by Ayn Rand · Nathaniel Branden · Alan Greenspan · Robert Hessen. Immense in scope and vision and filled with insight into human mo. The Power of Self-Esteem: An Inspiring Look at Our Most Important Psychological Resource. Nathaniel Branden (1963) - The ethics of emergencies, Ayn Rand (1963) - The 'conflicts' of men's inter. 239 Pages·1986·585 KB·0 Downloads·New! as three essays by Alan Greenspan, two by Nathaniel Branden, and one by Robert Hessen.

[This is the Audiobook CASSETTE Library Edition in vinyl case.] This collection of 26 essays constitutes a challenging look at modern society. The foundations of capitalism are being battered by a flood of altruism, which is the cause of the modern world's collapse. This is the view of Ayn Rand, a view so radically opposed to prevailing attitudes that it constitutes a major philosophic revolution. In this series of essays, she presents her stand on the persecution of big business, the causes of war, the default of conservatism, and the evils of altruism. Here is a challenging new look at modern society by one of the most provocative intellectuals on the American scene. This edition includes two articles by Ayn Rand which did not appear in the hardcover edition: The Wreckage of the Consensus, which presents the Objectivists views on Vietnam and the draft; and Requiem for Man, an answer to the Papal encyclical Progresso Populorum. This collection of 26 essays includes twenty by Ayn Rand as well as three essays by Alan Greenspan, two by Nathaniel Branden, and one by Robert Hessen. As an interesting relic of the past, this outlandish piece of propaganda is worth the listener's time, even though the author's overconfident sense of her own rightness and persistence at pressing her points with little respect for opposing views can quickly become more than a little annoying. Using outdated words such as "altruists" to represent the forces of evil who would overburden the poor, beleaguered American business community, Rand "protesteth" far too much. Americans have seen many of the abuses come to pass that Rand, writing in 1946, claimed would never happen if free enterprise were just left to its own devices, so many of her arguments will be lost on a modern listener. For instance, the antitrust laws forced railroad barons to use illegal payoffs to forge ahead with expansion, and they shouldn't, therefore, be blamed the antitrust laws are the real problem. Narrator Anna Field's cold, crisp voice is actually well suited to such a heartless piece as this. Recommended. Mark Pumphrey, Polk Cty. P.L., Columbus, NC Copyright 2001 Reed Business Information, Inc.
Reviews: 7
Vikus
A few years ago, after living through the worst presidency I've witnessed, that of Bush 43, I began to pay more attention to econo-political ideas. I was a moderate leftist, believing that conservatives and their Wall St partners had bankrupted the world economy. I was very receptive to liberal criticisms of so-called capitalism and the profit motive as the conduit for the greed that led to the aforesaid bankruptcy. It really seemed to me that the only solution was a more stringent regulatory environment. Looking back on it, I can still understand why I believed as I did.
Somewhere along the line, I began to start questioning my beliefs. I went back to school to earn an MBA and learned more about finance and economics. I hypothesized my own views about all this as though I were a business owner or CEO, facing turbulent market conditions. Then I noticed something. No business owed me a job, no gov't agency owed me survival, no one else owed me anything. In simple terms, my needs place no justifiable moral obligation on anyone else.

Although I was familiar with this book, I felt for a long time that I wasn't ready for it. Should all those liberal beliefs I'd adopted turn out to be wrong? In some ways, no. I was still sure that bigotry and nationalism weren't defensible. In basically every other way, yes. Liberal economic ideas are, once you're honest about policy ideas, fully indefensible.

Conservative or liberal leaning, I definitely recommend one take the ideas advanced in this book seriously. Consider them and be honest with yourself. The most extraordinary idea for me is that the cause of most of the problems of which we lament is the same regulatory power we hope will fix them. After this I'll be studying economic history of this regulatory environment to determine if/how it led to market imbalances and distorted incentives. So long as gov't has legal power over commerce, crony capitalism (NOT REAL CAPITALISM) will never end. Yet I'm curious to see how the regulatory machinery may create more problems than it solves. For now, I'd consider myself tentatively in favor of laissez faire capitalism.

I can also fully recommend the blog talk radio podcast of Dr Yaron Brook. It's a very thought provoking show for those tired of being locked into the outdated liberal-conservative buckets.
Vozuru
This is a 5 star book to understand the philosophy of Capitalism and the horrors of other systems. It does not endeavor to explain capitalism nor should it. I'm not sure Adam Smith felt the same way as Ayn Rand about "why" capitalism is so virtuous, but his book is better to understand the foundations of the system. Rand helps understand why it is better than any other. I believe that she also understood the need for government and implicit in that is "a mixed economy." Once you have government protecting any right of free man, it will infringe on what someone else feels is his/her right. If you have no basis in philosophy, this book can be cumbersome, full of "-isms" and "-ibilities." It is fun and educational whether you believe in capitalism or not.
Nea
Published 60 years ago this year, this book is still relevant not only because of Ayn Rand's deep insight, but despite all the social and technological changes the world has seen, much of the same machinery is in place.

Ayn explains the flaws with critiques of capitalism and how they often aren't rational, why the 'capitalism' of today isn't the capitalism she advocates, why aiming to profit by taking advantage of others isn't congruent with capitalism, and why the laissez faire capitalism she *does* advocate is based on goodwill and justice, not deceit and plunder.

As such, she presents capitalism as an economic system almost as an aside: she focuses on it as a moral system, and tells you why it's superior to its predecessors and various alternatives.

While there are a few things out of place, and the overall philosophy isn't perfect, this book presents a powerful case for why laissez faire capitalism should be the bedrock of a peaceful, rational society.
Leyl
The chapter What is Capitalism takes one back a bit, because it goes into the roots of why in any free or semi-free society, we must have property rights and individual rights to trade, i.e. capitalism. The chapter, The Roots of War is completely brilliant, and should be required reading in public schools IMO. More could have been said about how EVERY market is ALREADY regulated by supply and demand, and all gov regulations can possibly do is offer counter-orders to the inescapable laws and effects of demand and supply, mucking up how free markets regulate themselves in various brilliant ways. (There is no such thing as an unregulated market). Another example, not only are monopolies not possible in a free market, (a point driven ad nauseam by libertarians), but it's also true that shortages and surpluses are impossible, as these can only occur when price controls are instituted by economically illiterate bureaucrats. (Realize that shortages and scarcity are two different things). Shortages will cause scarcity, but scarcity CANNOT cause shortages in a free market. The chapter The Property Rights of Airwaves seems a bit out of place and an academic exercise that's a bit irrelevant. For anyone interested in how free markets self-regulate, I recommend The Government Against The Economy, by economist George Reisman. A brilliant short book. 'Not to be confused with his magnum opus titled Capitalism.