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ISBN:0691041660
Author: Thomas Sowell
ISBN13: 978-0691041667
Title: Say's Law: An Historical Analysis
Format: lrf doc lit azw
ePUB size: 1244 kb
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DJVU size: 1954 kb
Language: English
Category: Economics
Publisher: Princeton University Press; First Edition edition (November 21, 1972)
Pages: 256

Say's Law: An Historical Analysis by Thomas Sowell



Say's Law-the idea that "supply creates its own demand"-has been a basic concept in economics for almost two centuries. Thomas Sowell traces its evolution as it emerged from successive controversies, particularly two of the most bitter and long lasting in the history of the discipline, the "general glut controversy" that reached a peak in the 1820s, and the Keynesian Revolution of the 1930s. These controversies not only involved almost every noted economist of the time but had repercussions on basic economic theory, methodology, and sociopolitical theory.

Start by marking Say's Law; An Historical Analysis as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Thomas Sowell traces its evolution as it emerged from successive controversies, particularly two of the most bitter and long lasting in the history of the discipline, the "general glut controversy" that reached a peak in the 1820s, and the Keynesian Rev Say's Law-the idea that "supply creates its own demand"-has been a basic concept in economics for almost two. centuries.

Say's Law-the idea that "supply creates its own demand"-has been a basic concept in economics for almost two centuries. Say's Law-the idea that "supply creates its own demand"-has been a basic concept in economics for almost two centuries. These controversies not only involved almost every noted economist of the time but had repercussions on basic economic theory, methodology, and sociopolitical theory

Say's Law-the idea that "supply creates its own demand"-has been a basic concept in economics for almost two centuries. These controversies not only involved almost every noted economist of the time but had repercussions on basic economic theory, methodology, and sociopolitical theory

Say's Law-the concept that "supply creates its personal demand"-has been a uncomplicated notion in economics for nearly centuries. Thomas Sowell lines its evolution because it emerged from successive controversies, relatively of the main sour and durable within the heritage of the self-discipline, the "general glut controversy" that reached a top within the 1820s, and the Keynesian Revolution of the Nineteen Thirties. those controversies not just concerned virtually each famous economist of the time yet had repercussions on easy fiscal. Numerical Methods and Optimization in Finance. This book describes computational finance tools. We welcome extra inquiries. Extra resources for Say's Law: An Historical Analysis (Princeton Legacy Library).

Say’s Law: An Historical Analysis. Princeton: Princeton University Press. Say’s Law. In Eatwell, John, Milgate, Murray, and Newman, Peter, ed. The New Palgrave: A Dictionary of Economics. Volume 4. London: Macmillan, pp. 249–251. On Classical Economics. New Haven and London: Yale University Press.

Say's Law―the idea that "supply creates its own demand"―has been a basic concept in economics for almost two centuries. Thomas Sowell traces its evolution as it emerged from successive controversies, particularly two of the most bitter and long lasting in the history of the discipline, the "general glut controversy" that reached a peak in the 1820s, and the Keynesian Revolution of the 1930s. These controversies not only involved almost every noted economist of the time but had repercussions on basic economic theory, methodology, and sociopolitical theory. This book, the first comprehensive coverage of the subject, will be an indispensable addition to the history of economic thought. It is also relevant to all social sciences concerned with economic prosperity, with the nature of intellectual orthodoxy and insurgency, or with the complex relationships among ideology, concepts, and policies.

Originally published in 1972.

The Princeton Legacy Library uses the latest print-on-demand technology to again make available previously out-of-print books from the distinguished backlist of Princeton University Press. These editions preserve the original texts of these important books while presenting them in durable paperback and hardcover editions. The goal of the Princeton Legacy Library is to vastly increase access to the rich scholarly heritage found in the thousands of books published by Princeton University Press since its founding in 1905.

Reviews: 2
Stanober
This is a very advanced and difficult book about one of the most misunderstood economic principles. Now normally I would think Thomas Sowell would be the best person to describe this topic in simple and logical language. I think he tried but this book is simply not for the general economic reader. Sowell has had so many great contributions to economic readers but this book is dealing with a topic that should be easier to explain. I believe Sowell used the topic of Say's law in his dissertation for his Phd. I did enjoy Sowell's analysis of other economic greats and what they thought about Say and that is where this book gets very dense. You should a very good background on classic economists and also Marx and Keynes to truly respect this book. In summary, tough read even if you love Sowell's books.
Diredefender
While this is a short book on an economic concept generally considered to be straightforward, don't be fooled. Unlike Sowell's more popular works, this is written in the format of a dissertation and requires an undergraduate level of economic knowledge. Very interesting to read 1970's Sowell, as he's writing as more of a student than as a master. If you liked this, I recommend Sowell's "On Classical Economics". Combined, the two provide a cogent defense of classical economics, charming to Chicago school and Austrian school thinkers alike. Enjoy.