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ISBN:185788051X
Author: John. Naisbitt
ISBN13: 978-1857880519
Title: Global Paradox: The Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful Its Smallest Players
Format: docx mbr azw doc
ePUB size: 1511 kb
FB2 size: 1641 kb
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Language: English
Category: Economics
Publisher: Nicholas Brealey (1994)
Pages: 304

Global Paradox: The Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful Its Smallest Players by John. Naisbitt



Personal Name: Naisbitt, John. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Global paradox : the bigger the world economy, the more powerful its smallest players, John Naisbitt.

Global Paradox, his most recent book, is an extension and elaboration of the 1982 "high tech, high touch" theme of Megatrends. For "tech" substitute and for "touch" substitute "tourism" and you have Naisbitt's happy prescription for the 21st century. Naisbitt illuminates the pervasiveness of the telecommunications industry by describing its components. In four numbered sections he develops the following case: (1) the telecommunications industry of the future will be a merger of computer, telephone and television technology, (2) since no one possesses all the needed technology, strategic alliances will change competitors into collaborators, (3) when fully implemented, the network will be global, digital and seamless, and (4) personal computing devices (Apple's Newton is. a precursor) will catalyze an information revolution.

Includes bibliographical references (p. 277-292) and index. Global paradox - Powering the paradox: the telecommunications revolution - Travel: globalization of the world's larges industry - New rules: a universal code of conduct for the 21st century - Dragon century: the Chinese power from its parts - Asia nd Latin America: new areas of opportunity

Read full description. See details and exclusions. item 1 Global Paradox-John Naisbitt -Global Paradox-John Naisbitt. item 2 Global Paradox: The Bigger World by John Naisbitt (Paperback) -Global Paradox: The Bigger World by John Naisbitt (Paperback). From the author of Megatrends, this guide to a new pulse for change has as its central theme - the larger the system, the smaller and more powerful the parts. Full of examples, insights and forecasts, this book shows how the small-is-powerful revolution is already in action.

Naisbitt looks at the many contradictions of the global economy and a global culture, summing up the major paradox: "The bigger the world economy, the more powerful its smallest players. As with his other works, his ideas are supported mostly by citations from the popular press. The title is the theme of the book as well as its own powerful metaphor of what is happening in the globalized world. His thesis is encapsulated in the subtitle of the book: "The Bigger the World Economy, The More Powerful Its Smallest Players".

By: John Naisbitt Published in 1994. Smaller companies are becoming more powerful. Speedier, efficient, and flexible. Smaller players may become more dominant. Will expand if they innovate. Merging and partnerships can be beneficial.

PowerPoint Presentation Global Paradox The Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful its Smallest Players Angela Deng CS 408 â Section 3 By: John Naisbitt Published i. Angela Deng CS 408 Section 3. The bigger the world economy, the more powerful its smallest players Smaller companies are becoming more powerful - PowerPoint PPT Presentation. PowerPoint PresentationGlobal ParadoxThe Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful its Smallest PlayersAngela DengCS 408 Section 3By: John NaisbittPublished in 1994The bigger the world economy, the more powerful its smallest playersSmaller companies are becoming more powerfulSpeedier, efficient, and flexible Smaller players may become more dominantWill expand if they innovate Merging and partnerships can be beneficial Started out as smaller d demand.

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- From Global Paradox: The Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful Its Smallest Players, by John Naisbitt (William Morrow and C. 1994). Published on: Apr 1, 1994. More from Inc. Sponsored Business Content.

Now he's back, with his latest shape-shifter, Global Paradox: The Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful Its Smallest Players. Wired: The subtitle of your new book, The Bigger the World Economy, the More Powerful Its Smallest Players, seems to summarize your message. John Naisbitt: The subtitle is a formulation of how telecommunications is creating one single global economy, but at the same time empowering individuals and small groups by providing them opportunities that only big companies had before. For instance, my own company, Megatrends Lt. comprises only four people, including me. But we are involved in 57 joint ventures in 42 countries. Many small players are global forces today. This could never be done before.

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Reviews: 4
Arador
Paradoxes surround us in the big/little, global/local, corporate/personal, and public/private contexts. You can find here insights for the emergence of the post-industrial global culture and economy. Because of the global integration, small businesses have even more hope of becoming successful in the future. Here are a few of my favorite quotes:

--A famous paradox in architecture that has served the profession well is "Less is more," meaning that the less you clutter a building with embellishments, the more elegant it can be, the greater a work of architecture it can be.

--The entrepreneur is also the most important player in the building of the global economy. So much so that big companies are decentralizing and reconstituting themselves as networks of entrepreneurs.

--The principle of the global paradox--the bigger the world economy, the more powerful its smallest players--applies especially to business. Huge companies like IBM, Philips, and GM must break up to become confederations of small, autonomous, entrepreneurial companies if they are to survive. Big companies and "economies of scale" succeeded in the comparatively slow-moving world of the four decades to the mid-1980s. But now, only small and medium-sized companies--or big companies that have restyled themselves as networks of entrepreneurs--will survive to be viable when we turn the corner o f the next century. Already 50 percent of U.S. exports are created by companies with 19 or fewer employees; the same is true of Germany. --Economies of scale are giving way to economies of scope, finding the right size for synergy, market flexibility, and above all, speed. ...What is going on in American corporations today is the "ODD effect" : outsourcing, de-layering, and deconstruction.

--In the years ahead all big companies will find it increasingly difficult to compete with--and in general will perform more poorly than--smaller, speedier, more innovative companies.

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Painbrand
Popular Futurism in the vein of Alvin Toffler, but even more journalistic and accessible. The title is the theme of the book as well as its own powerful metaphor of what is happening in the globalized world. His thesis is encapsulated in the subtitle of the book: "The Bigger the World Economy, The More Powerful Its Smallest Players". The ever-increasing speed of change provides ever smaller economic entities - businesses and countries - with greater opportunities given the flexibility inherent in being smaller. Pink talks about this in "Free Agent Nation". Naisbitt relates it to countries. It was this idea that inspired me (in my book "The Optimistic Jew") to think of Israel as a disproportionate (to its size) driving force in the world economy and to aspire to the highest median income in the world by 2030.
Inerrace
Narrative is indeed the most salient feature of this book, and apparently there is nothing too exciting about it-- in any rate, that was the my impression when I first read it some ten years ago.

This time, it really amazed me: the predictions made some ten years ago are so correct, particularly the part concerning Asia and China where I live. Furthermore, when the author quoted, he epitomized.... I don't know much about Futurism, but I am not sure if analysis or theories could contribute much in a book of this nature. Anyway, had I paid better attention to this book, I could have an extra edge in my investment portfolio particularly in Greater China... And so, I will waste no time in checking out his other books.
Dagdarad
The first time, I read this book, I expected analytical contents and insights. But it give so much narration; no analysis and supportive evidence or data.