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ISBN:3826597745
Author: G. van Huylenbroeck,Ingrid Verhaegen
ISBN13: 978-3826597749
Title: Hybrid Governance Structures for Quality Farm Products: A Transaction Cost Perspective (Institutional Change in Agriculture & Natural Resources)
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ePUB size: 1893 kb
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Language: English
Category: Economics
Publisher: Shaker Verlag GmbH, Germany (May 24, 2002)
Pages: 182

Hybrid Governance Structures for Quality Farm Products: A Transaction Cost Perspective (Institutional Change in Agriculture & Natural Resources) by G. van Huylenbroeck,Ingrid Verhaegen



Van Huylenbroeck, G. (2003). Hybrid governance structures to respond to new consumer and citizens’ concerns about food. In G. Van Huylenbroeck, W. Verbeke, L. Lauwers, I. Vanslembrouck, & M. Dhaese (Ed., Importance of policies and institutions for agriculture (pp. 191–206). Gent: Academic Press. Van Huylenbroeck, . & Espinel, R. L. (2007). Hybrid governance structures for quality farm products. A transaction cost perspective: Vol. 6. Institutional change in agriculture and natural resources. Williamson, O. E. (1985).

A Transaction Cost Perspective. Collective action in a complex institutional environment. A case study of small-scale wool growers in South Africa. Supermarkets' procurement systems involve purchase consolidation, a shift to specialised wholesalers, and tough quality and safety standards. To meet these requirements, producers have to make investments and adopt new practices. This is hardest for small producers, who risk exclusion from dynamic urban markets increasingly dominated by supermarkets.

tween transaction cost economizing logic and the actual processes of organiza-. tional change in transitional agriculture, two heuristic approaches can be utilized: (1) to identify additional (other than organizational form–related) transaction costs, which could also influence these processes; and (2) to identify factors of organiza-. tional change lying beyond the scope of transaction cost economizing logic. SEPTEMBER–OCTOBER 2005 27. This paper is aimed at the consideration of both of these approaches. Because the institutional environment–related transaction costs have an inertial. origin, it is natural to believe that they must necessarily decrease over time, which. was also noted by Brem (2000). Another aspect of this relationship of time depen

Governance structures such as contracts, networks, bureaucracy, cooperation or markets are organisational solutions for making institutions effective, . they are necessary for guar-anteeing rights and duties and their use in coordinating transactions. Instead of this ‘ex-post institutional change perspective’, we prefer ‘an ex-ante institutional change perspective’ where a physical transaction is planned or has already occurred, intentionally or unintentionally, without being institutionalised. We do this for analytical reasons. From this point of view, a transaction is a change in social re-lationships. It is the change in individual rights and mutual obligations that constitutes a transaction in this perspective (see Schmid, 2004: 69ff.

Instead of this ‘ex-post institutional change perspective’, we prefer an ‘ex-ante institutional change perspective’ where a physical transaction is planned or has already occurred, intentionally or unintentionally, without being institutionalised. It is the change in individual rights and mutual obligations that constitutes a transaction in this perspective (see Schmid, 2004: 69ff).

The institutional perspective on the management of natural resources in the light of the interdisciplinary debate on sustainability is the focus of the agricultural and resource economist Konrad Hagedorn. Institutions and Sustainability reflects the latest trends in combining institutions and sustainability, summarises new conceptual developments in environmental economics and outlines new approaches towards the analysis of governance of natural resources

Curricular response at this time, invested in new institutional models, did not stop at vocational concerns. The social contract was extended to previously marginalized groups (. The evolution of the governance model in higher education is a complex idea to pin down with simple definitions.

Hybrid governance structures for quality farm products – A transaction cost perspective (Institutioneller Wandel der Landwirtschaft un. hange in Agriculture and Natural Resources) Guido Van Huylenbroeck, Ingrid Verhaegen Shaker Verlag, 2002 . Landscape Amenities Guido Van Huylenbroeck, Isabel Vanslembrouck Springer Science+Business Media, 2005

An organizational economics perspective - Volume 3 Issue 1 - VLADISLAV VALENTINOV. Cook, Michael 1995, ‘The Future of US Agricultural Cooperatives: A Neo-institutional Approach’, American Journal of Agricultural Economics, 77: 1153–1159. Cook, Michael and Iliopoulos, Constantine 2000, ‘Ill-defined Property Rights in Collective Action: the Case of Agricultural Cooperatives’, in Ménard, Claude (e., Institutions, Contracts, and Organizations: Perspectives from New Institutional Economics, London: Edward Elgar. Pollak, Robert 1985, ‘A Transaction Cost Approach to Families and Households’, Journal of Economic Literature, 23: 581–608. Putnam, Robert 1993, Making Democracy Work: Civic Traditions in Modern Italy, Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

Business structures of agriculture in the dynamics of changes in the environment – perspective of the organizational ecology. Number of sectors can be split into a dual market structure: q with a highly competitive market center (assuming a unimodal distribution of heterogeneous resources and the existence of the economies of scale or economies of scope of production in a market center) occupied by a small number of large firms (generalists). q and high-density market periphery with a large number of small specialized organizations