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Download Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best...And Learn from the Worst epub book
ISBN:0446556084
Author: Robert I. Sutton
ISBN13: 978-0446556088
Title: Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best...And Learn from the Worst
Format: lrf lrf azw docx
ePUB size: 1444 kb
FB2 size: 1997 kb
DJVU size: 1983 kb
Language: English
Category: Business Culture
Publisher: Business Plus; First Edition, 1st Printing edition (September 7, 2010)
Pages: 320

Good Boss, Bad Boss: How to Be the Best...And Learn from the Worst by Robert I. Sutton



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Good Boss, Bad Boss is devoted to answering that question. He realized that most of these stories and studies swirled around a central figure in every workplace: THE BOSS. As Dr. Sutton digs into the nitty-gritty of what the best (and worst) bosses do, a theme runs throughout Good Boss, Bad Boss - which brings together the diverse lessons and is a hallmark of great bosses: They work doggedly to "stay in tune" with how their followers (and superiors, peers, and customers too) react to what they say and do.

Good Boss, Bad Boss teaches the art and the science of practical leadership for the 21st century. I would consider it a must-read for anyone looking to improve their impact and accelerate their desired outcomes. Brad Smith, CEO of Intuit. We are damned lucky to have Bob Sutton. I'm a new manager and this is the best material I've read regarding how to be a good manager. None of the seminars or training sessions my employer has sent me to can touch this advice. There is an example of a good boss in this book similar to my own situation: An executive I once worked for was supportive and obliging in my need to take extra time off while dealing with my troubled teenager.

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and worst flaws ofa Bad Boss? Dr. Robert Sutton wrote GOOD BOSS, BAD. BOSS to answer these questions, inspired by the thousands ofe-mails, articles, blog posts, and conversations provoked byhis bestseller The No Asshole Rule. Dr. Sutton now applies his commonsense approachto showhowthe great. bosses in our world differ from those who are. just so-so, or,worse yet, downright inept. from the Worst ROBERT I. Except as permitted under the .

About book: This book was helpful since I am new at the "management" role. I don't consider myself as a manager, but rather a collaborator guiding my team along with me to do better and produce quality work all while enjoying our work; making what we do meaningful. I constantly learn from my colleagues (those above and below my pay grade). This book has made me aware of "boss-holes". I steer clear of boss-holes and reel myself in when I am in the verge of being one. Thank you so much!! The book was ok. It has some good ideas, but honestly, it is a lot of common sense.

If you are a boss who wants to do great work, what can you do about it? Good Boss, Bad Boss is devoted to answering that question. Stanford Professor Robert Sutton weaves together the best psychological and management research with compelling stories and cases to reveal the mindset and moves of the best (and worst) bosses. This book was inspired by the deluge of emails, research, phone calls, and conversations that Dr. Sutton experienced after publishing his blockbuster bestseller The No Asshole Rule. He realized that most of these stories and studies swirled around a central figure in every workplace: THE BOSS. These heart-breaking, inspiring, and sometimes funny stories taught Sutton that most bosses - and their followers - wanted a lot more than just a jerk-free workplace. They aspired to become (or work for) an all-around great boss, somebody with the skill and grit to inspire superior work, commitment, and dignity among their charges. As Dr. Su
Reviews: 7
Fawrindhga
When was the last time you read an engaging, spot-on, crisp, in-your-face, business book . . . whose resonance not only made you laugh but also made you wonder what you were thinking by getting into organizational life in the first place? Right, probably Bob's LAST book!

As a recovering corporate type who now consults on organizational and leaderhship issues I encounter the grim realities that Bob captures powerfully on a daily basis. Bob nails the rise in incredibly bad behavior on the part of (usually) well-intended but flat-out over-worked senior leaders. We are pounding ourselves and our people so hard for short term results of any kind that we have forgotten how to get the best out of them. We have never needed peak levels of creativity, engagement, and risk-taking by our very best people. But what do we do? We unwittingly create toxic cultures of fear and risk aversion and when it doesn't work out or our best people bail we look everywhere but into the mirror to find culpability.

Most of my clients are getting this as a gift (though they claim they don't have time to read). This smart, wry, and witty indictment is MOST required for those who profess they don't have time to read anything. And it's not just another guy talking about the problems. It's all about solutions. If you pick one book to read as you think about your business and talent challenges in 2011, THIS is one you will be glad to own.
Simple
I'm a new manager and this is the best material I've read regarding how to be a good manager. None of the seminars or training sessions my employer has sent me to can touch this advice. There is an example of a good boss in this book similar to my own situation: An executive I once worked for was supportive and obliging in my need to take extra time off while dealing with my troubled teenager. Her empathy toward my personal situation influenced me to perform my responsibilities seamlessly and exceedingly well. How she managed me and others and the information in this book is my model for how to avoid being someone's worst nightmare.

Now that I look back, I remember seeing books akin to this one on her desk or bookshelf. Managers in the making, pick up this book!
Raelin
I enjoyed the book, it shows we can learn from the worst situations. I enjoyed the research aspects however the stories really brought the concepts to life.
Vizil
Bob Sutton launched an international revolution with his brutally honest bestseller, the No A**hole Rule, and in his latest book he's turned his deep experience and knowledge about what makes a lousy boss into becoming a good one.

What's refreshing in these authentic and often humorous pages is that the solutions are not formulas. Being a good boss requires a myriad of wise "little ways" to eke out improvements, and a very big one, being a decent person. We learn the importance of Lasorda's Law, how George Washington used an aura of confidence "to learn on the job," and how a NASCAR pit crew manager innovated to turn saved seconds into victories.

Sutton tells it like it is, and it's worth the price of admission just to find out the name of the Hollywood Producer Jerk who ejected his assistant onto the side of a freeway for the crime of looking at him in the rear view mirror, and to learn the critical lessons of a chapter entitled "Squelch Your Inner Bosshole."

Sutton knows more about the thin line between a good or bad boss, and understands it's a daily human skirmish, less about meeting goals and quarterly numbers and more about understanding our need to produce, create, share and be appreciated. But you won't find happy talk here. Some of my favorite stories are inside gems about how cleverly orchestrated conflict delivers results, how Brad Bird of Pixar sought out "malcontents" to produce the hit movie "The Incredibles," or how the Senior Editor of The Onion maintains creativity every week in a 3-day brainstorm.

Leave your novel at home and put this valuable book in a visible spot at your cube or on your desk. It's bound to be the subject of conversation. Who knows, your boss may even thank you.
WOGY
Most of the book is a series of examples on the importance of being a humane, self-aware, and capable boss.

I would say that it likely preaches somewhat to the choir, in that arrogant and self-aware bosses are unlikely to be swayed by the book (or even read it), while good bosses (or those trying to be good bosses) are likely to already hold to these principles. That said, it is a useful reality check that even the best people, in bad circumstances, can fall prey to being bad bosses, and in that, the book does decently well. But it could do that in many fewer words.
Ckelond
Kind of disappointing. I love Robert Sutton's work and I can understand how he is continually rated as one of the top professors in the US. This book is useful but it seems to fall short on the actual research side. Much of it is Sutton's opinion.
Walan
Not as good as his other book the No A Hole Rule which I thought was excellent. This book was okay, but in my opinion there are better books about being a good boss.
I have a long commute & make a habit of improving my team leadership skills. It's not just my profession, it's also my hobby. Crazy that I actually like listening to this stuff, but I do. So, I've listened to a lot of leadership audiobooks and can say that this is my second favorite one next to The 5 Levels of Leadership Proven Steps to Maximize Your Potential by John Maxwell. Highly recommended, and I am putting the author's first book on my list of books to read when it's time for a new order.