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ISBN:0971935610
Author: L. J. Rittenhouse
ISBN13: 978-0971935617
Title: Do Business with People You Can Trust: Balancing Profits and Principles
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ePUB size: 1392 kb
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Language: English
Category: Business Culture
Publisher: Andbeyond Communications (May 1, 2007)
Pages: 166

Do Business with People You Can Trust: Balancing Profits and Principles by L. J. Rittenhouse



At time when investors are wondering who to trust, .  . She examines the letters that CEOs write in their annual reports to show readers how to spot executives with clear sight, wise judgment and the ability to balance profits and principles. While many people complain that these l At time when investors are wondering who to trust, . Rittenhouse has written the first-ever guide to identifying trustworthy business leadership.

Laura Rittenhouse has done us all a great favour in her book "Do Business with People you can Trust". It should be required reading for all CEO's and corporate communicators. Second, She has focused on the "goodies" strongly represented by Berkshire Hathaway, and the "baddies" represented by Enron. The emphasis on these two companies is heavy and I would have preferred something a little more balanced. Other than that I enjoyed the book immensely, it is well and intelligently written with a mischievous sense of humour.

At time when investors are wondering who to trust, . Home All Categories Business & Investing Books Do Business with People You Can Trust: Balancing Profits and Principles. ISBN13: 9780971935600. Do Business with People You Can Trust : Balancing Profits and Principles. by L. J. Rittenhouse.

Rittenhouse Rankings works with Fortune 500 companies to strengthen execution and financial performance. Rittenhouse coaches corporate teams to identify blind spots and create trust-building stakeholder communication and action strategies. Do Business with People You Can Trust: Balancing Profits and Principles.

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Devotional Ventures: 60 Inspiring Devotions by Business Professionals for Business Professionals Corey Cleek Regal Books, 2007 г. - What would Jesus do on the job? . Отгружается в течение 3-4 недель ( время доставки). 144. Do Business with People You Can Trust: Balancing Profits and Principles L. Rittenhouse Andbeyond Communications, г. - At time when investors are wondering who to trust, . She examines the letters that CEOs write in their annual reports to show readers how to spot executives. This book examines the impact of downsizing on employee morale and productivity. Downsizing, due to economic changes, has played an integral part in business, the public sector, and schools.

Do Business with People You Can Trust: Balancing Profits and Principles" by L. 166 pages 05/2007 AndBEYOND Communications Inc. (old cover - 144 pages, 04/2002. Warren Buffett Wealth : Principles and Practical Methods Used by the World's Greatest Investor" by Robert P. Miles. John Wiley & Sons.

63/2042 21. Personal Name: Rittenhouse, L. Varying Form of Title: Do business with people you can trust. Publication, Distribution, et. , (c)2002. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

At time when investors are wondering who to trust, L.J. Rittenhouse has written the first-ever guide to identifying trustworthy business leadership. She examines the letters that CEOs write in their annual reports to show readers how to spot executives with clear sight, wise judgment and the ability to balance profits and principles. While many people complain that these letters are a waste of time to read, Rittenhouse shows investors how to read between the lines to ferret out useful information that management may be trying to hide. Quoting from the letters of Warren Buffett and other trust-building CEOs, she establishes standards of disclosure that readers can use to determine the worth of other company communications. In Do Business With People You Can Tru$t readers are invited to be part of a movement to instill improved business disclosure and accountability. This is the Fifth Year Anniversary Edition.
Reviews: 7
Mitynarit
I've read dozens of investment books over the last couple of years, and this is clearly one of the best. It provides a very useful and simple method of improving the quality of the single stocks I buy, and is also a good quick read. I can't recommend it enough, you'll never ignore your annual reports again!
A better name for the book would be "How to find a CEO you can trust". The book focuses on helping shareholders analyze the trustworthiness of their CEO. It is more than just general business principles.
Rittenhouse's basic thesis is that it's best to invest in firms where the CEO can clearly and forthrightly explain what's going on and demonstrates his knowledge of the business. Throughout her book, she gives details on how to analyze the CEO's shareholder letter. (How many people don't know there's one in every annual report?). She uses great concrete examples of good letters (many from Warren Buffet) and bad ones (several from Enron) to prove her points and further explain them. It's very well written, and reasonably short.
Her ideas are critical for individual investors to use. Unlike portfolio managers running mutual funds who limit their viewpoint to the next quarter, we can be more patient. Hence it's particularly important for us to invest in firms for the long haul, and that demands having someone in charge that knows what he's doing, and can effectively communicate it. If a business can't be made understandable to the shareholders, can we assume the CEO understands it? And if he can't communicate it to us, how does he communicate it to the people who work for him?
I've worked on Wall Street for 15 years, and I must admit that the only shareholder letter I read every year was from the CEO where I worked. In that case, this book is also very important, as it provides a way to analyze it and compare the one (or few) annual reports you read against the hundreds that Rittenhouse reads.
After a dozen chapters explaining particular points to look for, Rittenhouse presents a one page score card, which can be used when judging annual reports. It's really easy to use and I very much look forward to using it on the stack I've accumulated.
I found the juxtaposition of Enron's letters with Berkshire Hathaway particularly useful. It helps to demonstrate the central point of the book: If the CEO can explain in clear language how the business is run, it's a good sign. If they can't perhaps it's cause they don't know or would simply rather you not know what's going on.
Thanks to the author for sharing her easy to use recipe for finding firms with good caretakers. As Warren Buffet said, she is really doing the work of angels.
Mogelv
I was dissapointed in the effort & evidence provided by author is supporting her case that there are items within shareholder letters which can lend predictive value to future performance.
I question why the constant comparisons between Enron and Berkshire Hathaway are present. What is the point? Warren Buffet is more forthcoming than Ken Lay. Congratulations, Unfortunately the entire business world could have told us that. This point is blasted home every chapter. Honestly, the book reads like a marketing device for Berkshire company. I agree that Berkshire is a great company & now I am more interested in the company & the stock. But, should that have been what I got out of reading this book.
Also, the book completely ignores the fact that companies could use some of the methods the author describes to write a good letter, and yet be corrupt. One of the methods involves specific goals & in subsequent letters describe how they were progressing. Could a CEO overstate inventory, boosting profits, comment that goals were reached, write a wonderful thorough letter and still be lying through there teeth.
The book raises a few good points involving looking at year over year data, but overall I cannot recommend this book.
I am not questioning the value of the shareholder letter, just the way the author explains how she utilizes it.
Timberahue
Laura Rittenhouse has done us all a great favour in her book "Do Business with People you can Trust". It should be required reading for all CEO's and corporate communicators. At last we can see the propects for creating shareholder value by full and honest disclosure and she has created a useful technique for assessing the value (or lack of it)implicit in the shareholder letters published by CEOs.
All those who have had the uneviable task of writing reports or letters to shareholders know the temptations of the fashionable phrase or the piece of internal jargon. They are easy to write and get the job done - but we should all learn to stand back and ask "exactly what does that mean?"
Disclosure requirements are increasing in all countries but no amount of rules or legislation will prevent the use of meaningless phrases or words. The author helps us understand what works and what doesn't.
I only have two suggestions for improvement. First, I think we are benefiting here in the UK from additional disclosures about risk management and many companies are now reporting on the major risks they are taking and how they manage them. More on that would have been helpful. Second, She has focused on the "goodies" strongly represented by Berkshire Hathaway, and the "baddies" represented by Enron. The emphasis on these two companies is heavy and I would have preferred something a little more balanced.
Other than that I enjoyed the book immensely, it is well and intelligently written with a mischievous sense of humour. I hope Ms Rittenhouse will persevere with her theme and continue her analysis for an update in a year or so.