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ISBN:0804758921
Author: Sally H. Clarke,Naomi R. Lamoreaux,Steven W. Usselman
ISBN13: 978-0804758925
Title: The Challenge of Remaining Innovative: Insights from Twentieth-Century American Business (Innovation and Technology in the World E)
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ePUB size: 1233 kb
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Language: English
Category: Biography and History
Publisher: Stanford Business Books (March 10, 2009)
Pages: 368

The Challenge of Remaining Innovative: Insights from Twentieth-Century American Business (Innovation and Technology in the World E) by Sally H. Clarke,Naomi R. Lamoreaux,Steven W. Usselman



Naomi R. Lamoreaux and Kenneth L. Solokoff Corning as creative responder : a Schumpeterian interpretation of disruptive innovation, Margaret .

Clarke, Lamoreaux, and Usselman provide new insight into this game changing institutional innovation, and their work challenges all of us to imagine the new ways of organizing and commercializing innovation that will power economic development in the 21st century. Richard Florida, Author of The Rise of the Creative Class and Director of the Martin Prosperity Institute at the University of Toronto's Rotman School of Management.

This scheme delineates a variety of ways in which entrepreneurship has persisted across the 20th century-and accentuates how ongoing organizational re-arrangement has contributed mightily to its sustained vitality.

The contributors explore two main themes: the challenge of remaining innovative and the necessity of managing institutional boundaries in doing so. The collection is organized into four parts, which move outward from individual firms; to networks or clusters of firms; to consultants and other intermediaries in the private economy who operate outside of the firms themselves; and finally to government institutions and politics

2000 Dissertation: 1987. Business History, The Johns Hopkins University The World’s Newest Profession: Management Consulting in the 20. th. Century . History, The Johns Hopkins University . History of Technology, University of Delaware . Cum Laude, Economics, Amherst College. Fellowships, grants, and awards. Mementos: Looking Backwards at the Honda Motorcycle Case, 2003-1973, in Sally H. Clarke, Naomi R. Lamoreaux, and Steven Usselman, (ed., The Challenge of Remaining Innovative: Insights from Twentieth-Century American Business (Palo Alto: Stanford University Press, 2009), 219-242. Give Professionalization a Chance!

Naomi R. Lamoreaux, Kenneth L. Sokoloff, and Dhanoos Sutthiphisal. Patent Alchemy: The Market for Technology in US History. For most of US history, however, it was as common for inventors to prot from their ideas by selling off or licensing the patent rights. This article traces the different ways in which inventors resolved the information problems involved in marketing their patents.

Patents and Free Enterprise: The TNEC Reconsidered. Adams, Stephen B. Stanford University and Frederick Terman’s Blueprint for Innovation in the Knowledge Economy. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press, 2009.

Technology and Culture. Technology and Culture. Johns Hopkins University Press.

Business Historians and the Challenge of Innovation. The Political Economy of Postal Reform in the Victorian Age, Smithsonian Contributions to History and Technology, 55 (2010): 3-12. org/59397 Expanding the Realm of Communications.

Sally H. Lamoreaux, Steven W. Usselman.

The Challenge of Remaining Innovative explores innovation as a complex phenomenon that may be organizational as well as technological, that operates both within firms and across the broader economy, and that involves matters not only of research and development, but also of marketing, design, and government relations. The contributors explore two main themes: the challenge of remaining innovative and the necessity of managing institutional boundaries in doing so. The collection is organized into four parts, which move outward from individual firms; to networks or clusters of firms; to consultants and other intermediaries in the private economy who operate outside of the firms themselves; and finally to government institutions and politics. This scheme delineates a variety of ways in which entrepreneurship has persisted across the 20th century―and accentuates how ongoing organizational re-arrangement has contributed mightily to its sustained vitality.