» » Capital Market Development in Transition Economies: Country Experiences and Policies for the Future (Oecd Proceedings)
Download Capital Market Development in Transition Economies: Country Experiences and Policies for the Future (Oecd Proceedings) epub book
ISBN:9264161198
Author: Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development,France) Conference on the Development of Securities Markets in Central and Eastern Europe and Russia (1997 : Paris,OECD,Centre for Co-Operation With Non-Members,Eva Thiel-Blommestein
ISBN13: 978-9264161191
Title: Capital Market Development in Transition Economies: Country Experiences and Policies for the Future (Oecd Proceedings)
Format: mobi azw txt rtf
ePUB size: 1179 kb
FB2 size: 1439 kb
DJVU size: 1771 kb
Language: English
Category: Accounting
Publisher: Organization for Economic (October 1, 1998)
Pages: 310

Capital Market Development in Transition Economies: Country Experiences and Policies for the Future (Oecd Proceedings) by Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development,France) Conference on the Development of Securities Markets in Central and Eastern Europe and Russia (1997 : Paris,OECD,Centre for Co-Operation With Non-Members,Eva Thiel-Blommestein



Since that time, these countries have created or re-established equity markets and actively developed government securities markets. In some cases, corporate bond markets have also begun to flourish. Yet, many problems remain in achieving desired levels of efficiency, transparency and stability. For the first time, the evolution of both equity and securities markets in these countries is critically evaluated. Financial experts, economists from OECD member countries as well as government officials from several central and eastern European countries and Russia describe strategic choices and policy options based on their experiences with different privatisation methods, regulatory approaches and government debt management policies.

The economic significance of natural resources: key points for reformers in eastern europe, caucasus and central asia. THE ECONOMIC SIGNIFICANCE OF NATURAL RESOURCES: Key points for reformers in Eastern Europe, Caucasus and Central Asia. The OECD is a unique forum where governments work together to address the economic, social and environmental challenges of globalisation. The OECD is also at the forefront of efforts to understand and to help governments respond to new developments and concerns, such as corporate governance, the information economy and the challenges of an ageing population. The Organisation provides a setting where governments can compare policy experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practice and work to co-ordinate domestic and international policies.

Agricultural Policies in Emerging and Transition Economies : Monitoring and Evaluation 1998 (ISBN 9264160744). Investment Guides Kazakhstan (ISBN 9264161082). Development Centre Seminars Different Paths to a Market Economy: China and European Economies in Transition (ISBN 9264160884). OECD Proceedings The Competitiveness of Transition Economies (ISBN 926416121X). Investment Guides The Kyrgyz.

The Organisation for Economic Cooperation and Development (OECD) was created in 1961 as the successor to the the Organisation for European Economic Cooperation (OEEC), which had itself been created to manage the reconstruction of Europe following World War II. During the 14 years since George Marshall's 1947 Harvard University address and the launch of the plan that bore his name, European prosperity had been restored, and the European Community had been established.

OECD Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Скачать (PDF) . Читать. Organisation for Economic Co-Operation and Development.

Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development. Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD). The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD, French: Organisation de coopération et de développement économiques, OCDE) is an international economic organisation of 34 countries founded in 1961 to stimulate economic progress and world trade. It is a forum of countries committed to democracy and the market economy, providing a platform to compare policy experiences, seek answers to common problems, identify good practices, and co-ordinate domestic and international policies of its members. Most OECD members are high-income economies with a very high Human Development Index (HDI) and are regarded asdeveloped countries.

History of the OECDThe Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) celebrated its 50th anniversary, but its roots go back to the rubble of Europe after World War II. Determined to avoid the mistakes of their predecessors in the wake of World War I, European leaders realised that the best way to ensure lasting peace was to encourage co-operation and reconstruction, rather than punish the defeated. By making individual governments recognise the interdependence of their economies, it paved the way for a new era of cooperation that was to change the face of Europe. The Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) was officially born on 30 September 1961, when the Convention entered into force. Other countries joined in, starting with Japan in 1964.

Most OECD members are high-income economies with a very high Human Development Index ( HDI) and are regarded as developed countries. OECD is an official United Nations Observer. In 1961, the OEEC was reformed into the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development by the Convention on the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development and membership was extended to non-European states. The OECD's headquarters are at the Château de la Muette in Paris, France. The OECD is funded by contributions from member states at varying rates, and had a total budget of €363 million in 2015. Organisation for European Economic Co-operation.

Central and Eastern Europe and Russia have been actively building capital markets since the beginning of the transition period in 1990. Since that time, these countries have created or reestablished equity markets and actively developed government securities markets. In some cases, corporate bond markets have also begun to flourish. Yet many problems remain in achieving desired levels of efficiency, transparency and stability. For the first time, the evolution of both equity and securities markets in these countries is critically evaluated. The policy choices for promoting these objectives and further integration of the fledgling markets into the international capital markets are being discussed, although they are not always straight-forward and free of controversy. This book brings into focus some of the main obstacles on the road to building sound capital markets.

Financial experts, economists from OECD member countries as well as government officials from several Central and Eastern European Countries and Russia describe strategic choices and policy options based on their experiences with different privatisation methods, regulatory approaches and government debt management policies. The presentation of actual experiences and policy challenges encountered by government officials in creating and regulating securities markets -- in particular very frank accounts by Russian and Czech officials of attempts to combat fraudulent practices of certain market participants -- makes this book unique. The range of lessons found here will provide support for countries currently in market turmoil and insights on the process of building capital markets for policy makers, academics and market participants.