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ISBN:158243459X
Author: Jane Vandenburgh
ISBN13: 978-1582434599
Title: A Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century: A Memoir
Format: txt mbr mobi lit
ePUB size: 1752 kb
FB2 size: 1854 kb
DJVU size: 1508 kb
Language: English
Category: Specific Groups
Publisher: Counterpoint; First Edition edition (March 1, 2009)
Pages: 400

A Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century: A Memoir by Jane Vandenburgh



There is little sex in this pocket history of sex. What you have is a memoir that is powerful and affecting. Jane deal with memory of her fractured family, her father committing suicide, in despair with designing soulless buildings and harassed for his bi-sexuality, when she is 9 or ten and her mother descending into madness as the children form a band the three of them to cope before the mother is institutionalized and the children placed with an aunt wiht four children. It si aso great fun and fitting for the offbeat zaniness of Jane.

Jane Vandenburgh's life began normally enough. Born into a certain kind of family -affluent, white. Fortunately there is a lot more to this book as there is with everything Jane Vandenburg writes. This memoir picks up where Jane Vandenburgh's novel Failure to Zigzag left off, an unforgettable trip that begins with a noir childhood in Southern California of the '50s. Published on May 15, 2009. Published on March 3, 2009.

Vandenburgh, Jane Family. Rubrics: Problem families. by James R. Gregory with Jack G. Wiechmann. ISBN: 0844233072 Author: Gregory, James R. Publication & Distribution: Lincolnwood, IL. NTC Business Books, (c)1999. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book A pocket history of sex in the twentieth century : a memoir, Jane Vandenburgh.

Jane Vandenburgh’s memoir is a survival story, a tale of how she overcame a strange and sad childhood to become a strange, complicated and slightly less sad adult. Ms. Vandenburgh has an interesting mind. The book’s messy second half is full of gripping set pieces, especially her pointillistic retelling of the night she and her second husband were mowed down and seriously injured by a car in Berkeley. I never have much of a damper on my mind, Ms. Vandenburgh tells us, and barely have one on my mouth, so I tend to say things as they come to me. That is this book’s tragic flaw and also the source of its not inconsiderable charm. A pocket history of sex in the twentieth century. Home All Categories Biography Books Women's Biographies A Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century: A Memoir. ISBN13: 9781582435596. A Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century : A Memoir. The author's father, a respectable architect with homosexual desires, can't construct a future for himself within the lie he's living, commits suicide, leaving behind a bohemian leaning wife and three young children.

Vandenburgh is the author of two novels, Failure to Zig-Zag (Farrar, Straus and Giroux 1989), The Physics of Sunset (Pantheon 1999), and two books of memoir, A Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century (Counterpoint 2009) and The Wrong Dog Dream: A True Romance(Counterpoint, 2013), which is an intense parallel narrative of dog ownership and a new marriage while living. Once a recipient of the Mildred Sherrod Bissinger Memorial Endowed Fellowship, Vandenburgh now teaches a yearlong course in the book length narrative through the Djerassi Artists Residency program in Woodside, California, as well as an annual workshop at Fishtrap: Writing and the West in Oregon. Interview with Jane Vandenburgh.

Born into "a certain kind of family"-affluent, white, Protestant-Jane Vandenburgh came of age when the sexual revolution was sweeping the cultural landscape, making its mark in a way that would change our manners and mores forever. But what began as an all-American life soon spun off and went spectacularly awry. In the midst of private trauma and loss, Vandenburgh delights in revealing larger truths about American culture and her life within it. Quirky, witty, and uncannily wise, A Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century is a brilliant blend of memoir and cultural revelation. Format Hardback 400 pages.

Vandenburgh and her two brothers were taken to live with an aunt and uncle who already had four kids of their own. The first half of the book, which recalls this lonely and troubled childhood, is exquisitely written and awash with poignant, moving details, like her description of how she left down the lid of her record-player after her mother was committed so that it would keep trapped forever the air her mother had breathed

The Vandenburgh Seniors awwwwnd the Whites awwwwnd the -Rolands all own houses, plural, she goes on, and did we imagine this was anything that got them immediately into their version of heaven? Honestly? She glances up from what she is doing, one eye winked shut against the upward bloom of her cigarette smoke. She inhales smoke, changes brushes in the water jar. Shitheels, she pronounces, whispering to herself. Excerpted from A Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century by Jane Vandenburgh. Excerpted by permission of Counterpoint.

It would be a useful reference for a student who wants to evaluate how an author uses diction and anecdotes. Sex and suicide: Exploring the dark, funny mind of Jane Vandenburgh. Readers are often counseled not to judge a book by its cover. They also shouldn't judge a book by its title.

Born into “a certain kind of family”—affluent, white, Protestant—Jane Vandenburgh came of age when the sexual revolution was sweeping the cultural landscape, making its mark in a way that would change our manners and mores forever. But what began as an all-American life soon spun off and went spectacularly awry.Her father, an architect with a prominent Los Angeles firm, was arrested several times for being in gay bars during the 1950s, and only freed when her grandfather paid bribes to the L.A.P.D. He was ultimately placed in a psychiatric hospital to be “cured” of his homosexuality, and committed suicide when she was nine. Her mother—an artist and freethinker—lost custody of her children when she was committed to a mental hospital. The author and her two brothers were raised by an aunt and uncle who had, under one roof, seven children and problems of their own.In the midst of private trauma and loss, Vandenburgh delights in revealing larger truths about American culture and her life within it. Quirky, witty, and uncannily wise, A Pocket History of Sex in the Twentieth Century is a brilliant blend of memoir and cultural revelation.
Reviews: 7
Dddasuk
This author has a way with gloss. And she probably entitled this wonderful memoir “The pocket history of sex in the twentieth century” to write the literary wrong that she cites: most women do not write anything about sex. She grew up in 1950s California with her parents, her father an architect who went to the wrong bars, her mother an artist who inked storyboards for Disney. They were both people who charmed and hated everybody else but they, especially her mother, never fit in ,e.g.: “Then what holds the stars up? Geo asked our mom. Through that pure night air, stars seemed to jiggle and dance, this jitter caused by atmosphere. Why sweetie-honey-baby, she sighs, I honestly have no idea. Then she smirks. She smirks as if she’s sharing this joke with our dad, the nowhere, now-here, now-not-here, who is what she calls Your Faw-thur Which Aren’t in Heaven. This is how I know she’s drunk. Geo begins to cry. Wrong answer, Mom, Wrong answer for a five-year-old. Geo’s crying harder now, so our mother kneels on the hard sand and takes him in her lap, singing in her broken voice, Ground-round version, mother and child, holy infant so tender and mild, sleep in heavenly peeep, sleep in heavenly peep. She sings this though it is February. There, there, there, there, she tells Geo, holding him to her, grimacing over his head to go, See! From this Will and I are supposed to get how hilarious it is that our mother is expected to act like a mother, instead of what she really is, which is this rare thing, this wonderfully gifted and spectacular being, the Radiant Child she always has been. ( From 2. Pull of Gravity). The family is wonderful, but after the father commits suicide, the mother is committed to a mental institution and the children are committed to other relatives, just a little too late to ever escape the original parental input. Jane Vandenburgh has plenty to say about that, too. I particularly liked her observation that the words “creamy, succulent and juicy” refer to a pornographic menu. Sex is reserved for slimy adults attacking children and men unlike any she has ever met or even imagined violently forcing themselves on her. What a dog. Fortunately there is a lot more to this book as there is with everything Jane Vandenburg writes
Rocksmith
I am loving this book, and couldn't wait to put in my two cents
even though I have a few more pages to go. Vandenburgh's humor is
right up my alley, and I like the way the first and second sections of the book complement each other, for doesn't one's history always affect the present tense? Her wild and crazy past gives resonance to her current life in Berkeley. She "gets" each character with a snatched-up line
set into italics that makes each family member real, achingly felt, just like it is when you laugh too hard. Laugh until you cry. Go for it!!!
Maridor
The only interest was noticing a relative in the book..hard to stay with the writer.
Nikobar
I might never have heard of this book, but ran across some interesting posts on Facebook by the author, so I looked her up. And I'm so glad I did, because A POCKET HISTORY OF SEX IN THE TWENTIETH CENTURY: A MEMOIR, by Jane Vandenburgh, is one of the most entertaining, funny, moving and Interesting memoirs I've read in a coon's age. A native Californian hailing from Redondo Beach, Vandenburgh has an unusually quirky sense of humor, and a strong, if shifting, sense of herself, as a girl and a young woman growing up in the 50s and 60s. She was a middle child (two brothers) from a very dysfunctional family, and, largely raising herself, she learned early on about such things as homosexuals (they weren't called 'gays' yet), the porn industry, suicide, mental illness and more. All stuff a girl shouldn't have to know about so young.

Vandenburgh writes in an elliptical, dizzying sort of style, not just jumping back and forth in time, but also sometimes in a circular, swooping, conversational way, going off on odd tangents, then coming back around to where she started. Which is NOT a bad thing; it suits her story, which is in many ways a crazy kind of tale, sometimes hilarious, other times heartbreakingly sad. She describes, for examples, visits to a friend's house where the father there sets up seedy porn films in a dark inner room of the house, then leaves the teenage girls to watch them. Jane and her friends became something of experts on the fine points of such films, soon able to predict just when "the money shot" was coming. Yeah, I know. Pretty creepy. But Vandenburgh manages to make it both funny, awful, and somehow moving all at the same time.

Unofficially adopted by an aunt and uncle when her own family has come apart, Vandenburgh tells of how she coped, how she and her brothers were blended in with their four cousins as they tried to learn how to be at least semi-normal. And later we watch her various attempts at college, work, and a first marriage to a much older man, a college professor. Two children later, she meets someone else. Divorce, remarriage, a move to the east coast, then back again. And through it all she struggles to adjust her own 'free spirit' to the demands of a normal life, never quite succeeding. Her new husband's career as a publisher takes them to Washington, D.C., of which place she tells us, with her California girl sensibility -

"... is one of the least libidinous places I've ever been ... The sexlessness of Washington, D.C., feels positively eerie, as if it thinks in its own mind it's the late 1950s, as if anybody cares whom you go to bed with! No one cares! No one cares whom you do or do not sleep with unless IT'S CHILDREN or maybe CHIMPS IN THE NATIONAL ZOO!"

Hmm ... I know this book was published in 2009, but are we talking about the same Washington, D.C., here? Well, no matter.

And she made me chuckle too in telling how she ended up in graduate school -

"... the consummate English major, of course, even though this is already an almost perfectly useless degree and I hate poetry that rhymes and the kind of poets - I think of them as 'fagotty' - named Byron and Keats and Shelley."

(I'm chuckling again, sorry, but I have similar memories of grad school, and Vandenburgh and I are about the same age.) But it's not all hilarity here, oh no. Her scary tales of casual sex in the 70s and 80s, which sometimes ended badly, VERY badly, are not very funny at all. And what she shares about her gay father, and how his family deals with his 'problem,' fluctuates wildly between funny and tragic. The same can be said of her mother's mental illness and outspokenness. But the chapter I found most moving of all was "Take Me with You," about Jane's longtime friendship with Carole Koda, Zen poet Gary Snyder's wife. Carole for years suffered from a rare form of cancer (that took her life in 2006), and the obvious bond that showed between the two women as they spent a long afternoon together nearly brought me to tears.

But enough. Quirky, crazy, moving, sad. All of the above. I loved this book. Very highly recommended.