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ISBN:0253212189
Author: Gene. Logsdon
ISBN13: 978-0253212184
Title: YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN: Adventures of a Contrary Life
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ePUB size: 1294 kb
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Language: English
Category: Regional U.S.
Publisher: Bloomington, Indiana: Indiana University Press; 1st ed edition (1998)
Pages: 204

YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN: Adventures of a Contrary Life by Gene. Logsdon



The measure of his courage - and contrariness - is that he has been successful. In You Can Go Home Again, he tells us what motivated him and what success has meant. While its great the community would come together for it, I just tired of reading it after it went on several pages. May 25, 2011 Natasha rated it really liked it.

-Wes Jackson, The Land Institute. Gene Logsdon has lived by failing according to most people s standards of success, and has made a good life. A good book, too. I like You Can Go Home Again (to name one reason of several) because it comes from experience. It has to do, not with speculation or theory or wishful thinking, but with what is possible.

Gene Logsdon has published his autobiography. He returned to the good life of his childhood - at least almost. As a witness of the great change in agriculture, he feels a little bit like the last of the dinosaurs, one of the last generation who grew up on a traditional farm before agrobusiness destroyed the culture of rural America. Logdson does not present.

Wes Jackson, The Land Institute.

The author, Gene Logsdon, October 21, 1998 I try to consider deeper thoughts. Sometimes my nose gets so high up in the air I can hardly work this damn computer. Our potatoes are rather small too, come to think of it. My latest book, YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN, is a little different from most of the earlier ones in that I try to consider deeper thoughts. Deeper than potatoes. I manage to insult institutional religion, institution education, commercial journalism, and commercial agribusiness, which probably means that I will lose what few friends I have remaining.

You Can Go Home Again: Adventures of a Contrary Life (1998). The Big Things in Life are the Little Things (1998, with Steve Zender). The Contrary Farmer's Invitation to Gardening (1997). The Contrary Farmer (1995). The Low-Maintenance House (1987). Moneysaving Secrets: A Treasury of Salvaging, Bargaining, Recycling, and Scavenging Techniques (1986). Gene Logsdon's Practical Skills: A Revival of Forgotten Crafts, Techniques, and Traditions (1985). Wildlife in the Garden: How to Live in Harmony With Deer, Raccoons, Rabbits, Crows, and Other Pesky Creatures (1983)

You Can Go Home Again: Adventures of a Contrary Life, by Gene Logsdon. lt;< Previous Article. This document may be purchased. This Item is Part of your Subscriptions.

You Can Go Home Again: adventures of a contrary life. Wildlife in the Garden: How to Live in Harmony With Deer, Raccoons, Rabbits, Crows, and Other Pesky Creatures. Successful berry growing: how to plant, prune, pick, and preserve bush and vine fruits. Small-scale grain raising: an organic guide to growing, processing, and using nutritious whole grains for home gardeners and local farmers.

You Can Go Home Again: Adventures of a Contrary Life (Farming Biography). ISBN 9780253334190 (978-0-253-33419-0) Hardcover, Indiana University Press - Indiana University Press, 1998. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Learn More at LibraryThing.

A Sanctuary of Trees by Gene Logsdon. Page Updated: Book Views: 11. Author. Chelsea Green Publishing. Homesteading: How to Find New Independence on the Land by Gene Logsdon. You Can Go Home Again: Adventures of a Contrary Life by Gene Logsdon.

Reviews: 7
Zicelik
I cannot say enough about this book, it is great, a meat and potatoes book.
Topmen
Not as good as other of Gene Logsdon's books
Agamaginn
A warm, reflective, and entertaining work by Mr. Logsdon. It is timeless and well worth reading no matter what experience level one possesses. May he continue to give us more to reflect on and live by as we remember our roots.
Snowskin
I'll be brutally honest. I read some Farm Journal stuff when I was a kid, but I just could never quite warm up to this book, and it wasn't because of "The Blizzard" chapter either. There was plenty of stuff here that I could relate to, and even more that I should have been able to, but, finally, I just kinda skimmed the last few chapters and put it back on the shelf. Sorry, Gene. There are simply too many other good memoirs out there that I can't wait to read, and several are already in my teetering to-read pile. What first attracted me to YOU CAN GO HOME AGAIN was the pr copy that mentioned Logsdon had spent several years in the seminary, an experience I thought I'd relate to, since I did some time in one of those institutions myself. But even that part didn't really grab me - a bad sign from the get-go. And then when he got deeper and deeper into the back-to-the-land, grow-your-own-food kinda stuff, my interest really started to wane. Don't get me wrong, there have been a couple of farm memoirs I've really loved (I was a "pseudo" farm kid myself, growing up next door to my Grandpa's small farm). Ron Jager's EIGHTY ACRES is an all-time favorite of mine, as is the late Curtis Stadtfeld's FROM THE LAND AND BACK. Both books are set on farms less than an hour from my own hometown (Reed City): near McBain and Remus (all three towns in west Michigan). Another beautifully written Michigan farm memoir is Anne-Marie Oomen's PULLING DOWN THE BARN. Perhaps my biggest beef with Logsdon's book is (and this is my opinion only) there's a little too much about the farming and not enough about the people involved. Lemme close this way. Perhaps if the national economy really goes to hell this year and I have to get out in the back yard and plant my own vegetables just to survive, I'll take this book down and give it another try. In the meantime, all the best to you, Gene Logsdon. I tip my hat to your self-sufficient lifestyle. - Tim Bazzett, author of REED CITY BOY
Skunk Black
Somewhat an autobiography, this book tells less of the tale of the author himself, and more of the happenings of the places he lived in. While it has some information, this is definitely not a how-to book.

Logsdon takes us to the later years of his childhood, where he is preparing for the priesthood. While he loves to write, farming calls out to him. However, he is slated to be one of the better scholars of the church and is pushed in that direction. That all changes when he has a chance to work on a farm in the service and discovers just what is missing from his life.

The next part details the early years of his marriage and his time spent writing for a farm magazine. While he enjoys the writing, the subjects do not always please him and he finds himself leaning to the smaller publications that cover Organic Farming and sustainable ways to use the land. He also discovers that he enjoys writing books as well.

With the success of some of his books he is able to return "home" and buy some land for a farm. The latter half of the book is located on or near this farm and he outlines greatly the life over the last century in the small towns around the area. He remembers fondly the good times and laments that the towns are slowly dieing now, being replaced by bigger cities.

Logson's writing is wonderful. It has a sense of humor and is greatly descriptive. While he tends to go on quite a bit on certain subjects its like listening to someone tell a story. You may have heard it a thousand times and groan outwardly, but inside you're always excited for the telling. The only part of the book I couldn't really get into was the softball chapter. While its great the community would come together for it, I just tired of reading it after it went on several pages.

You Can Go Home Again
Copyright 1998
204 pages