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ISBN:0739327968
Author: Rick Bragg
ISBN13: 978-0739327968
Title: The Prince of Frogtown (Random House Large Print)
Format: lit azw txt lrf
ePUB size: 1452 kb
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Language: English
Category: Professionals and Academics
Publisher: Random House Large Print (May 6, 2008)
Pages: 432

The Prince of Frogtown (Random House Large Print) by Rick Bragg



Inspired by Rick Bragg’s love for his stepson, The Prince of Frogtown also chronicles his own journey into fatherhood, as he learns to avoid the pitfalls of his forebearers. With candor, insight, and tremendous humor, Bragg seamlessly weaves these luminous narrative threads together and delivers an unforgettable rumination about fathers and sons. About The Prince of Frogtown. And the book documents the unexpected corollary to it, the marvelous journey of Rick’s later life: a journey into fatherhood, and toward a child for whom he comes to feel a devotion that staggers him. With candor, insight, tremendous humor, and the remarkable gift for descriptive storytelling on which he made his name, Rick Bragg delivers a brilliant and moving rumination on the lives of boys and men, a poignant reflection on what it means to be a father and a son.

Praise for The Prince of Frogtown. Bragg crafts flowing sentences that vividly describe the southern Appalachian landscape and ways of life both old and ne. .His father’s story walks the line between humorous and heartbreaking. I've enjoyed All Over but the Shoutin' and Ava's Man, and I enjoy most of Bragg's contributions to Southern Living, but The Prince of Frogtown came up short compared to the other two. However, let me be quick to point out that the fact that my father was also an alcoholic may have colored some of my perception, yet, having said that, I still have concerns about the book.

Find nearly any book by Bragg,Rick. Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. The Prince of Frogtown: ISBN 9780739368398 (978-0-7393-6839-8) Random House Audio, 2008. Redbirds: Memories from the South (Panther). ISBN 9781860463976 (978-1-86046-397-6) Softcover, Harvill Pr, 1999.

Автор: Bragg, Rick Название: The Prince of Frogtown Издательство: Random House (USA) Классификация: ISBN: 0739368397 ISBN-13(EAN): 9780739368398 ISBN: 0-7393-6839-7 ISBN-13(EAN): 978-0-7393-6839-8 Обложка/Формат: Compact Disc Вес: . 44 кг. Дата издания: 0. 5. Yet it was very nearly wiped out in its early years.

Any type of book or journal citing Rick Bragg as a writer should appear on this. The Prince of Frogtown (Random House Large Print Rick Bragg. Filed Under: Books Books Rick Bragg. The Best Novelists of All Time The Greatest Books to Read to Kids 35+ Books Everybody Lies About Having Read The Most Overrated Books of All Time Books You'll Never Finish Reading Books That Changed Your Life All the Opening Sentences from Stephen King Books, Ranked The All-Time Greatest Works of Stephen King The Greatest Science Fiction Novels of All Time.

The Prince Of Frogtown. The Prince Of Frogtown. He could hear the piano ring across the ditch, even hear people shout, but he could smell the liquor that was always in the house on a Sunday and even steal a taste of it when no one was looking, so it was more real. The holy ghost moved invisible, but they could feel it in the rafters, sense it racing inside the walls.

Narrated by Rick Bragg. In this final volume of the beloved American saga that began with All Over but the Shoutin’ and continued with Ava’s Man, Rick Bragg closes his circle of family stories with an unforgettable tale about fathers and sons inspired by his own relationship with his ten-year-old stepson. He learns, right from the start, that a man who chases a woman with a child is like a dog who chases a car and wins

Narrated By: Rick Bragg. Publisher: Random House (Audio). Duration: 8 hours 0 minutes. The Prince of Frogtown documents a mesmerizing journey back in time to the lush Alabama landscape of Rick’s youth, to Jacksonville’s mill, the town’s blight and salvation; and to a troubled, charismatic hustler coming of age in its shadow, Rick’s father, a man bound to bring harm even to those he truly loves

The Prince of Frogtown documents a mesmerizing journey back in time to the lush Alabama landscape of Rick’s youth, to Jacksonville’s mill, the town’s blight and salvation; and to a troubled, charismatic hustler coming of age in its shadow, Rick’s father, a man bound to bring harm even to those he truly loves

The Prince of Frogtown documents a mesmerizing journey back in time to the lush Alabama landscape of Rick's youth, to Jacksonville's mill, the town's blight and salvation; and to a troubled, charismatic hustler coming of age in its shadow, Rick's father, a man bound to bring harm even to those he truly loves. Publisher: Penguin Random House AudioReleased: May 6, 2008ISBN: 9780739368404Format: audiobook. More Audiobooks By Rick Bragg. The Prince of Frogtown - Rick Bragg.

In this final volume of the beloved American saga that began with All Over but the Shoutin’ and continued with Ava’s Man, Rick Bragg closes his circle of family stories with an unforgettable tale about fathers and sons inspired by his own relationship with his ten-year-old stepson.He learns, right from the start, that a man who chases a woman with a child is like a dog who chases a car and wins. He discovers that he is unsuited to fatherhood, unsuited to fathering this boy in particular, a boy who does not know how to throw a punch and doesn’t need to; a boy accustomed to love and affection rather than violence and neglect; in short, a boy wholly unlike the child Rick once was, and who longs for a relationship with Rick that Rick hasn’t the first inkling of how to embark on. With the weight of this new boy tugging at his clothes, Rick sets out to understand his father, his son, and himself.The Prince of Frogtown documents a mesmerizing journey back in time to the lush Alabama landscape of Rick’s youth, to Jacksonville’s one-hundred-year-old mill, the town’s blight and salvation; and to a troubled, charismatic hustler coming of age in its shadow, Rick’s father, a man bound to bring harm even to those he truly loves. And the book documents the unexpected corollary to it, the marvelous journey of Rick’s later life: a journey into fatherhood, and toward a child for whom he comes to feel a devotion that staggers him. With candor, insight, tremendous humor, and the remarkable gift for descriptive storytelling on which he made his name, Rick Bragg delivers a brilliant and moving rumination on the lives of boys and men, a poignant reflection on what it means to be a father and a son.
Reviews: 7
Ndyardin
Ricky Bragg is a master storyteller. I love his entire series of books about his family, this included. Make sure you read his latest, "The Best Cook in the World." I just finished it and it is one of all time favorites. I read him years ago but am now inspired to re-read all of his books. The dialogue is exceptional. I have family in Bakersville, NC which is five hours away from Jacksonville, AL but also in the high Appalachians. I can hear my grandparents', aunts', and uncles' voices in his family's speech patterns. If you want to know why some of us hold onto our families in the South, read Rick Bragg. Or families anywhere. An exceptional read. Rick is a Pulitzer Price Winner and, in my humble opinion, a national heritage treasure!
Gold as Heart
This series was a very emotional read for me. The father was nothing like mine. My dad was a very loving man who was emotional abused by my mother. Why he lived with her for more than 50 years I will never know. I guess he loved her more than he loved himself.
I struggle with the love I feel for my mother because she has always rejected me and has clung to my younger brother and an older sister who died when she was 9 months old. My brother and I never got along & after my father died I had no contact with either my mother or brother for a number of years.
My brother died and I called to see if I could go to his funeral but my mother did not return my call and I did not go. Shortly after his death her older sister was very sick and her family called to let me know. This was the first time in years any family members had contacted me because they were afraid of my mother's reaction.
Days before my aunt died my mother & I would be present at the same time and she never spoke to me. It was only at my aunt's funeral that she said I was all she had left and she guessed she needed me.
Things were peaceful for a couple of years but she gradually became more and more controlling and I was forced to walk away for my own sanity. Now I struggle constantly because I feel the loss so profoundly. The loss is not the reality of our relationship but what I wish it was. Reading these books, listening to others talking about their mothers, looking at my husband's relationship with his mother just makes it so much worse.
I relate to Mr. Bragg on so many levels but not the deep, profound love he shares with his mother. We both grew up poor in the south. My parents both worked in textile factories, alcohol was a large part of my family and I often had to fight to fit in.
This series spoke to my heart in many ways. I am very glad I was introduced to his writing.
Wrathshaper
It is a given that this book is too interesting and well written to put down, having been written by Rick Bragg. Bragg lends dignity to his father's struggle with a number of demons, but it is terrifically funny as well. The humor makes this book palatable enough not to cry. To me, he has written about the blue-collar, Southern Everyman. I remember the Fifties and Sixties in Alabama, Lanett, to be exact. This book rings so true, so true.
Anicasalar
This is not the last book by Rick Bragg that I plan to read. HIs recounting of his father's life, and growing up poor in Alabama, is told with such insight and heart it is really like no other memoir I've ever read, and that is due primarily to the author's talent. Every page is a pleasure, and I look forward to going back to read the first two books in this trilogy. Easily one of the most rewarding books I've encountered in a long time. He makes the people in his childhood and adulthood come to life in the best way possible.
Gribandis
Wonderful book. A no brainer if you are a fan of Rick Bragg, being a memoir of his relationship with his father. But even if you are not a Bragg fan put it on your reading list if you enjoy Southern writing at it's best. Being raised a Southerner is a plus because Bragg will allude to aspects of the culture not often seen elsewhere, but it will also provide insights into Southern culture, especially males of the "New South" for those with different backgrounds.
Aver
I've enjoyed All Over but the Shoutin' and Ava's Man, and I enjoy most of Bragg's contributions to Southern Living, but The Prince of Frogtown came up short compared to the other two. However, let me be quick to point out that the fact that my father was also an alcoholic may have colored some of my perception, yet, having said that, I still have concerns about the book. The first one is that if you've read the two previous books in this trilogy there is some repeated material, and without the repeated material I'm not sure how many chapters there would be. The second thing is that there is significant historical background on Northern Alabama (and the surrounding regions) quoted from other sources - I question whether the volume of this material was helpful to the story line, They represent long detours. If they are meant as an apologetic for how people lived and died, as an explanation of their culture, I think the reader would have been better served by inserting historical background into the unfolding narrative rather than having to digest it in large chunks. A third thing that I wonder about is Bragg's account of his interaction with his stepson - on the one hand it is heartwarming, but on the other hand I have to wonder if Bragg isn't overplaying the whole redneck thing - I don't mind it in his short articles, but I wonder if he isn't protesting a bit too much in this book. Bragg is a great storyteller, no question about it, but the adult redneck persona is hard for me to accept in this volume.

And yet, if you are from an alcoholic family, especially if you have a parent who is a alcoholic, you can't help but relate to Bragg and sympathize with him on his quest to redeem his Dad - that is the story line - it is a story of gleams of light shutout by darkness, of occasional hope crushed with despair - and it is this story that makes the book worth reading. How many of us have loved (or wanted to love) someone whose life has been lived in ruin, and we've searched for just one redeeming element, one bright spot, one thing that man or woman has done to make his or her life worthwhile? We also look for a potential turning point, something that could have gone either way, so that we can say, "What if?"

If you have alcoholism in your family you'll probably relate to this book; if you have other messed-up elements in your family you may also relate to Bragg's quest. If your family is perfect and you'd like to see how the rest of us live - this is the book for you.