Download Doctor epub book
ISBN:0804108730
Author: Edward E. Rosenbaum
ISBN13: 978-0804108737
Title: Doctor
Format: azw rtf doc lrf
ePUB size: 1280 kb
FB2 size: 1838 kb
DJVU size: 1888 kb
Language: English
Category: Professionals and Academics
Publisher: Ivy Books; Media Tie In edition (July 30, 1991)

Doctor by Edward E. Rosenbaum



Edward E Rosenbaum (May 14, 1915 – May 31, 2009), was an American physician and author. He is best known for the autobiographical chronicle of his experience with throat cancer, The Doctor, (initially published as A Taste of My Own Medicine), which was the basis of the movie The Doctor, starring William Hurt as a physician modeled on Dr. Rosenbaum.

Great book, even though it is nothing like the movie. After reading this, I feel that EVERY doctor in America should be required to read this book as they come into the medical profession. Great book, even though it is nothing like the movie. Trained at the Mayo Clinic, decorated for his pioneering use of penicillin, widely respected and nationally known, Dr. Edward E. Rosenbaum had risen to the apex of his profession. But in 1985, following a simple biopsy, the most stirring and startling phase of his medical education began when he was diagnosed with cancer.

Rosenbaum gives a daily diary of his experiences in radiation therapy for cancer of the larynx, as well as an interesting narrative of the factors that led to the delay in getting an accurate diagnosis. He supplements this with many anecdotes and reflections from his long career as a doctor and from the practices of other doctors he knows. The book has little resemblance to the movie.

Edward E. Rosenbaum, American physician, writer, lecturer. Diplomate: American Board Internal Medicine. Decorated Bronze Star. A Taste of My Own Medicine: When the Doctor Is the Patient. 62828/?tag prabook0b-20. The Doctor (Formerly Titled : A Taste of My Own Medicine). QK8XY/?tag prabook0b-20. A Taste of My Own Medicine: When the Doctor Is the Patient by Rosenbaum, Edward E. (1988) Hardcover. Rosenbaum, Edward E. was born on May 14, 1915 in Omaha. Son of Sam and Bessie (Mittleman) Rosenbaum. Student, Creighton University, 1934. Bachelor of Science, Doctor of Medicine, University Nebraska, 1938. Master of Science in Medicine, University Minnesota, 1947.

Edward E Rosenbaum (May 14, 1915 – May 31, 2009), was an American physician and author. He is best known for the autobiographical chronicle of his experience with throat cancer, The Doctor, (initially published in as A Taste of My Own Medicine), which was the basis of the movie, The Doctor, starring William Hurt as a physician modeled on Dr. He was also the founder of the Division of Arthritis and Rheumatic Diseases at the Oregon Health & Science University, where a chair of medicine is named in his honor. YouTube Encyclopedic. Rosenbaum was diagnosed with cancer of the larynx at age 70. This book is a memoir of both his experiences as a doctor and as a patient, caught in the inexorable, sometimes painful, often humiliating round of cancer treatment. Little known facts about tal relationships. com User, June 26, 2008. I must identify myself so that my opinions may be put into proper context. Obs-Gyn) aged 84 retired 19 years.

Dr. Edward Rosenbaum, DMD is an oral & maxillofacial surgery specialist in Randolph, NJ. He graduated from University of Medicine And Dentistry of New Jersey and practices oral & maxillofacial surgery and oral surgery.

The doctor: when the doctor is the patient. Are you sure you want to remove Edward E. Rosenbaum from your list?

He is best known for the autobiographical chronicle of his experience with throat cancer, The Doctor, (initially published in as A Taste of My Own Medicine), which was the basis of the movie, The Doctor, starring William Hurt as a physician modeled on Dr. He was born in Omaha, Nebraska to Bessie Mittleman Rosenbaum and Sam Rosenbaum. He graduated from Omaha Central High School.

Find Deals & PDF download Doctor. by Edward E. Rosenbaum Book Views: 4. Author. Find & Download Book - Doctor.

"A graphic account of what it's like when a doctor crosses to the other side of the table and becomes a patient himself."--Parade Magazine
Reviews: 6
Moronydit
A wonderful book for all of us! If one is going into the medical field, it should be "mandatory reading"
I first read it many years ago. "The second reading" was just as meaningful as my first read!
the monster
Great book, great movie. Read this and buy a copy for your Dr. you might save his life or at least his soul!
Sharpmane
The book arrived in a timely manner. I was very pleased to find the book in excellent condition.
The book is perfect. Exactly what I was looking for. It's a paperback book. Great read if you're entering
the health field.
Iell
Dr. Edward E. Rosenbaum was diagnosed with cancer of the larynx at age 70. This book is a memoir of both his experiences as a doctor and as a patient, caught in the inexorable, sometimes painful, often humiliating round of cancer treatment. His cancer remained misdiagnosed for several months by a physician-acquaintance of Dr. Rosenbaum's, who had not kept himself up-to-date on the latest diagnostic tools available to his specialty. When Dr. Rosenbaum finally gets a second opinion from a younger doctor, who knows how to use a fiberoptic nasopharyngoscope, he must decide on a method of treatment. As most of us cancer patients do, whether or not we are physicians ourselves, he let his doctor make the choice for him: radiation.

Anyone who has ever undergone a course of radiation treatments will empathize with Dr. Rosenbaum's grimly humorous description of his own therapy: stripped of his civilian clothes; bound into an awkward position on the radiation god's altar, while its priests sprint out of the room. You are never more alone than in that treatment room. The radiation god manifests itself in a series of clunks and whirrs. You freeze into place, afraid that a single movement will cause the deadly beam to go astray and blind you or pierce your heart. After the exposure has taken place, you can never be certain if anything happened: if your cancerous flesh was actually attacked. Dr. Rosenbaum says:

"They tell me that I am being treated by X ray. X means unknown. I can't see, hear, taste, feel, or smell the X rays. I have no way of knowing if anything is happening or if the machine is working...The radiologist assures me that something will happen and asks me to have faith. Is he a priest?"

The author's primary physician is terse, sometimes unapproachable. He cancels appointments with Dr. Rosenbaum. When they do meet, the patient hides symptoms such as reddened skin from his doctor, afraid that he will be told he is dying.

Cancer changes all of his relationships. Some friends desert him. He is no longer the omnipotent physician. He is mortal, perhaps near death. They can't deal with that.

I read this autobiography in one sitting, fascinated by Dr. Rosenbaum's transformation from all-powerful physician to powerless, fearful patient, then back to physician again, but with the additional role of patient-advocate. Most of us choose to forget our experiences in the cancer ward, but this author courageously shares his year as a cancer patient with us.
Kazracage
It's a shame that this book is out of print. I had an old copy sitting around and recently re-read it. This book is written by a physician, and tells his story as he went from being a doctor to being a patient. As you may surmise, being on the other end of the stethoscope teaches him many life lessons, and inevitably makes him a much better physician. I think it's a very good read for people who are thinking about medicine as a life choice. As a physician, I think it's important for us to always try to have empathy for our patients and how it feels like to be in their positions. Especially when a life-threatening illness strikes.

It's been adapted into a great, critically-acclaimed movie starring William Hurt. If you haven't seen it, I strongly recommend that you try to catch it. You can purchase it on Amazon here: The Doctor. Another entertaining 'doctor' movie that came out around the same time is Michael J. Fox's Doc Hollywood. Although a much lighter romantic comedy, it's a fun movie for anyone interested in medicine.

If you enjoy this book, a great companion is Atul Gawande's Complications: A Surgeon's Notes on an Imperfect Science. It brings up some great ethical issues that physicians encounter in daily practice. Very highly recommended.
HyderCraft
Dr. Ed, which is what he was called, was my doctor back in the late 60's. He was a rheumatologist, not a heart surgeon. After my diagnosis of rheumatoid arthritis, he told me that what I needed was someone to talk to. I was 18, and living with my parents. Dr. Ed gave me very good advice that day. I saw him many years later and thanked him for telling me the truth, because it has helped me to this day.

I haven't read his book. I'm ordering it today. I have seen the movie and saw my old friend acting a cameo part in his own film. I was so proud to have known him.

He was a great man and doctor. He lived to be 93.