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ISBN:1400155363
Author: Johnny Heller,Howard Dully
ISBN13: 978-1400155361
Title: My Lobotomy: A Memoir
Format: txt docx doc lit
ePUB size: 1192 kb
FB2 size: 1671 kb
DJVU size: 1371 kb
Language: English
Category: Professionals and Academics
Publisher: Tantor Audio; MP3 - Unabridged CD edition (November 14, 2007)

My Lobotomy: A Memoir by Johnny Heller,Howard Dully



My Lobotomy: A Memoir. Howard Dully (Author), Charles Fleming (Author), Johnny Heller (Narrator). Get this audiobook plus a second, free. This book will show you what really happens after a lobotomy. This book will show you that it's damned hard to kill the human spirit. Howard Dully's unstinting look at the unconscionable lobotomy performed on him at age 12 is really more about growing up in a home without real love, with a father and stepmother with serious issues of their own. It is an eye-opening look at a tragic period in medical history and its misuse by both the medical establishment and caregivers.

My Lobotomy: A Memoir. Unabridged Audiobook. A gut-wrenching memoir by a man who was lobotomized at the age of twelve. Assisted by journalist/novelist Charles Fleming, Howard Dully recounts a family tragedy whose Sophoclean proportions he could only sketch in his powerful 2005 broadcast on NPR's All Things Considered. In 1960,' he writes, 'I was given a transorbital, or 'ice pick' lobotomy. My stepmother arranged it. My father agreed to it. Dr. Walter Freeman, the father of the American lobotomy, told me he was going to do some 'tests. It took ten minutes and cost two hundred dollars. Unabridged Audio Book. Download or Stream instantly more than 55,000 audiobooks. Listen to "My Lobotomy: A Memoir" on your iOS and Android device. Don't have an iOS or Android device, then listen in your browse on any PC or Mac computer. Charles Fleming, Howard Dully. I thought this was an interesting book. Listening to the guy made him sound like he was really a lot more functioning than I imagined. As this was such a NON-exact "science" that I gather there are a HUGE number of outcomes post-op.

At twelve, Howard Dully was guilty of the same crimes as other boys his age: he was moody, messy, rambunctious, and perpetually at odds with his parents. Yet somehow, this normal boy became one of the youngest people on whom Dr. Walter Freeman performed his barbaric transorbital or ice pick lobotomy. Abandoned by his family within a year of the surgery, Howard spent his teen years in mental institutions, his twenties in jail, and his thirties in a bottle. It wasn't until his forties that Howard began to pull his life together

By: Howard Dully, Charles Fleming. Narrated by: Johnny Heller. What does Johnny Heller bring to the story that you wouldn’t experience if you just read the book? Portability. Was there a moment in the book that particularly moved you?

In this gut-wrenching memoir, Howard Dully recounts what life was like after he was needlessly lobotomized by an unlicensed physician at the age of twelve at the behest of his abusive stepmother. In 1960, he writes, I was given a transorbital, or ‘ice pick’ lobotomy. Dully had never been crazy, and his (not very) bad behavior sounds like the typical acting-up of a child in desperate need of affection. It’s a tale of epic horror, and while Dully’s courage in telling it inspires awe, readers are left to speculate about what drove supposedly responsible adults to such unconscionable acts.

My Lobotomy - A Memoir. My Lobotomy - A Memoir. Download (epub, . 0 Mb). FB2 PDF MOBI TXT RTF. Converted file can differ from the original. If possible, download the file in its original format.

Howard Dully, NPR. I highly recommend My Lobotomy: a Memoir, a mentally painful book which made me question how Freeman was allowed to perform such an invasive, horrible, mind-altering procedure, the transorbital lobotomy, so long unchecked.

A gut-wrenching memoir by a man who was lobotomized at the age of twelve.Assisted by journalist/novelist Charles Fleming, Howard Dully recounts a family tragedy whose Sophoclean proportions he could only sketch in his powerful 2005 broadcast on NPR's All Things Considered."In 1960," he writes, "I was given a transorbital, or 'ice pick' lobotomy. My stepmother arranged it. My father agreed to it. Dr. Walter Freeman, the father of the American lobotomy, told me he was going to do some 'tests.' It took ten minutes and cost two hundred dollars." Fellow doctors called Freeman's technique barbaric: an ice pick-like instrument was inserted about three inches into each eye socket and twirled to sever connections from the frontal lobe to the rest of the brain. The procedure was intended to help curb a variety of psychoses by muting emotional responses, but sometimes it irreversibly reduced patients to a childlike state or (in 15 percent of the operations Freeman performed) killed them outright. Dully's ten-minute "test" did neither, but in some ways it had a far crueler result, since it didn't end the unruly behavior that had set his stepmother against him to begin with."I spent the next forty years in and out of insane asylums, jails, and halfway houses," he tells us. "I was homeless, alcoholic, and drug-addicted. I was lost." From all accounts, there was no excuse for the lobotomy. Dully had never been "crazy," and his (not very) bad behavior sounds like the typical acting-up of a child in desperate need of affection. His stepmother responded with unrelenting abuse and neglect, and his father allowed her to demonize his son and never admitted his complicity in the lobotomy; Freeman capitalized on their monumental dysfunction. It's a tale of epic horror, and while Dully's courage in telling it inspires awe, listeners are left to speculate about what drove supposedly responsible adults to such unconscionable acts.
Reviews: 7
AfinaS
Every person who thinks those of us with mental illnesses should, at best, stay in the closet or at worst, be locked away in a mental hospital needs to read this book.

Every person who thinks that child abuse is something worse than what they endured needs to read this book.

Who is more barbaric? The doctor with the artificially inflated ego who performs lobotomies? The parents who agree to allow this vicious assault to be performed on their children? The stepparent who goes doctor shopping to vanish a hated stepchild?

This book won't make you smile.

This book won't give you the warm fuzzies

This book will allow you to see into the hell that is mental health treatment. This book will show you what really happens after a lobotomy. This book will show you that it's damned hard to kill the human spirit.
Golkree
Take a twelve-year-old boy who has just lost his mother, add a stepmother who didn't like his shenanigans (and they were nothing more than the age-appropriate shenanigans of a twelve-year-old boy who has lost his mother) and who finds public school boring and not stimulating enough to keep him interested, add an overzealous doctor who became very famous for doing unnecessary brain surgery via the weed-whacker method), and you have the tragic story of 'My Lobotomy.' Add the fact that the stepmother LIED to said doctor to make sure he was considered for surgery, and a passive, out of touch father, and you have a pair that could qualify for worst parents ever.

Thus is the story of Howard Dully, a man who, thanks to his overwhelmed step mother, had his brain chopped up BY AN ICEPICK inserted through his eyes, in order to make HER life easier. Hers was easier. His was very nearly ruined. Luckily, after a lifetime of institutional living, he actually managed to come to a place of forgiveness and acceptance as he matured. As I read this book, and his story, I found myself vascillating between wanting to hug this boy and wanting to bitchslap his father and stepmother upside the head.

Walter Freeman, the lobotomist, once toured the country like a snake oil salesman, selling lobotomies to the families of anyone who was dealing with a difficult (or disliked) member. His criteria weren't strict. He didn't seem to have any problem diagnosing perfectly normal people as untreatable and irredeemable in order to whip out his one treatment option: An icepick. Mind you, he wasn't performing his procedure under general anesthesia or with any care or precision. He rendered his victims unconscious by passing electrical current through their brains. Then, with an icepick and a few taps with a small mallet to break through the back of the eye socket, he literally just used the pick to scramble the frontal lobe of the brain without visualizing the site at all. Sometimes it helped calm 'difficult' patients. More often than not, it just caused irreversible brain damage or death, or had no discernible effect at all.

Howard Dully had this done to him at the age of twelve. His input was not necessary. Hell, they didn't even tell him they did it for a number of weeks! He spent most of the rest of his young life in and out of mental institutions until he aged out. His step mother never allowed him to return home again.

My Lobotomy is a powerful story about a boy whose only crime was having trouble coping with the death of his mother and a stepmother ill-equipped to cope with him. Most disturbing of all is the fact that, if Dr. Freeman were performing this procedure today, half the kids I knew growing up would have been lobotomized. Were they crazy? No. They were simply bored with a school curriculum that wasn't challenging enough, and/or possibly ADHD sufferers.

A very good, engrossing It seems to me that all the thank you letters that Dr. Freeman received were from the family members of his victims, who would naturally find their annoying family members more agreeable after having their frontal lobes scrambled and rendering them much more passive. So who exactly benefited from this procedure?
Steep
Very interesting read, just a little slow. Cannot believe this man is alright and "normal" if there is such a thing. I had electro shock treatmeents back in the late 70's and only had termporary loss of memory. Over time, memory came back. Could not tell you now if it worked or if depression went away on it's own. Take anti depressant now and have since first meds came out. Wish this gentlement all the best. He certainly deserves it.
HeonIc
Howard Dully's unstinting look at the unconscionable lobotomy performed on him at age 12 is really more about growing up in a home without real love, with a father and stepmother with serious issues of their own. It is an eye-opening look at a tragic period in medical history and its misuse by both the medical establishment and caregivers. Well worth the time.
Reemiel
I always thought a lobotomy was done through the side,not the eye socket.I always thought the patient was left in a catatonic state. I am so glad to have this book to teach me something I didn't know. My thanks to Howard Dully to have the courage to expose the good, the bad and the ugly of his life. It was a well balanced account of a life disrupted in the worst way. For someone to take a little boy and treat him so badly, then to try to destroy him is heartbreaking. I am glad Howard has found love and compassion in his adult life. You are a role model to us all to stand tall and overcome,rather than succumb, to the difficulties in our lives. Thank you Howard Dully.
Bandiri
I have chosen a five star rating for the impact this man has had on my life. I have in no way suffered as he,but the compassion that was drawn out of me was a huge gift. Please,dear Howard,know that you are making hearts grow larger just by reading about the injustices done to you. This book should be read by all parents,teachers and anyone in contact with children who might need your protection. I may never be the same, in a good way.
Xisyaco
It's hard to fathom the suffering that Howard Dully endured for most of his childhood, extending into adulthood. He was given no real love after the death of his mother; he had no role models and never experienced a normal life until well into adulthood. He is a brave, strong, compassionate, loving and giving person who I admire greatly. After learning about so much of what he has endured throughout his life, I was horrified to learn just how much damage Freeman purposefully did to Howard's 12 year old brain. He used no moderation, and made no allowances for his age - I can only see Freeman as a monster!
Those were words I heard a lot, growing up, from my mother. She had never had brain surgery and she was not a stepmother. Phillip Wylies' story "Generation of Vipers" gave me solace and guidance in my adolescent years and perspective later, when I became an adult and father. Mr. Dully did a most admirable job of dealing with his past and his present, and I would encourage him to leave his brain to some agency that could share the post-traumatic effects of that terrible procedure.