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ISBN:0815608748
Author: Gary Scharnhorst
ISBN13: 978-0815608745
Title: Kate Field: The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-Century American Journalist (Writing American Women)
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ePUB size: 1382 kb
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Language: English
Category: Professionals and Academics
Publisher: Syracuse University Press (April 21, 2008)
Pages: 306

Kate Field: The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-Century American Journalist (Writing American Women) by Gary Scharnhorst



The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-century American Journalist. Author: Gary Scharnhorst. Publisher: Syracuse University Press. Produced under the auspices of the American Council of Learned Societies, the ANB contains over 17,500 profiles on historical figures written by an expert in the field and completed with a bibliography. The scope of the work is enormous-from the earlest recorded European explorations to the very recent past.

This study adds to our knowledge of nineteenth-century professional women while painting a colourful picture of one who made a vivid, but fleeting, impression on so many of her better-known contemporaries. -The Times Literary Supplement. Through this splendid biography, Scharnhorst has taken the first big step in restoring Kate Field to her rightful place in American literary and cultural history. - Resources for American Literary Study -Resources for American Literary Study

Writing American Women Series. New York: Syracuse University Press, 2008. Nineteenth-Century Zelig.

Start by marking Kate Field: The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-Century American Journalist as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. Kate Field didn't rebel against the narrow boundaries for women of her day, she didn't recognize them. She lived her life on her terms. Her artistic family gave her travel opportunities, a circle of creative friends and literary contacts. Books by Gary Scharnhorst.

Gary Scharnhorst's biography presents the fullest picture to date of a remarkably active woman writer, lecturer, actress, and-above all-self-promoter. The portrait that emerges is not always of an appealing individual, but it is one that demonstrates the ways in which Field moved beyond the supposed restrictions on female activities in the last half of the nineteenth century to live a truly self-defined life. Above all, Field was a skilled journalist for a wide range of periodicals, including her own short-lived but influential Kate Field's Washington (1890–95).

When Kate Field, a journalist appar- ently known to almost everyone in the nineteenth century and almost no one in the twenty-first, died suddenly of pneumo- nia during a travel-writing trip to Hawaii in 1896, the Chicago Tribune called her "perhaps the most unique woman the pres- ent century has produced. Yet this "unorthodox feminist" has been largely forgotten, making this biography a welcome addition to journalism histotiography. Gary Scharnhorst, a distinguished professor of English at the University of New Mexico and the author of biographies of Horatio Alger J. Charlotte Perkins Gilman, and Bret Harte, has produced an exhaustively detailed and well-documented narrative of Field's life. A precocious child, she read Charles Dickens at eleven, translated Molière and Racine at twelve, and began to contribute to the New Orleans Picayune at seventeen.

In the first book-length biography of Field, Gary Scharnhorst offers a fascinating portrait of a fiercely intelligent and enormously independent woman who contributed significantly to America's intellectual and social life in the late nineteenth century. Kate Field was an outspoken advocate for the rights of black Americans and founder of the first women's club in America. She campaigned to make Yosemite a national park and saved John Brown's Adirondack farm for the nation. Gary Scharnhorst is Distinguished Professor of English at the University of New Mexico. Библиографические данные. Kate Field: The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-century American Journalist Kate Field: The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-century American Journalist, Gary Scharnhorst Writing American women.

Kate Field: The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-Century American Journalist. Syracuse, NY: Syracuse University Press, 2008: 3. ^ Scharnhorst, Kate Field, pp. 9-10. Gary Scharnhorst, "Kate Field and the New York Tribune," American Periodicals, vol. 14, no. 2 (2004), pp. 159-178.

Nomadic, unreflective and, despite having turned some heads, probably a virgin to the end of her days, Field had no private or inner life to speak of - or at least none that can be recovered, and Scharnhorst was wise not to try. I need a clear head to accomplish the work I must do in this world, Field once stated, and nothing so unfits a sensitive nature for mental exertion as emotional intensities. Scharnhorst was also wise not to make big claims for Field’s writing. The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-Century American Journalist.

The Many Lives of a Nineteenth-Century American Journalist. 2008. 1 Estimated 10K+ Copies Sold. In this eloquent and immensely readable biography, Gary Scharnhorst offers a fascinating, often poignant portrait of a fiercely intelligent and enormously independent woman who contributed significantly to America's intellectual and social life in the late nineteenth century. Kate Field was an outspoken advocate for the rights of black Americans and founder of the first woman's club in America. While still a journalism graduate student at the University of Iowa, Millie began writing for the Stratemeyer Syndicate, which published the phenomenally popular Hardy Boys series, among others. Soon, Millie was tapped for a new series starring amateur sleuth Nancy Drew, a young, independent woman not unlike Millie herself.

Kate Field was among the first celebrity journalists. A literary and cultural sensation, she reported the news while frequently becoming news herself because of her sharp wit and vibrant presence. She wrote for several prestigious newspapers, such as the Boston Post, Chicago Tribune, and New York Herald, as well her own Kate Field's Washington. Field's friends and professional acquaintances included Charles Dickens, Robert Browning, Elizabeth Barrett Browning, Anthony Trollope, and George Eliot. Legendary novelist Henry James patterned the character of Henrietta Stackpole after her in The Portrait of a Lady. In this eloquent and immensely readable biography, Gary Scharnhorst offers a fascinating, often poignant portrait of a fiercely intelligent and enormously independent woman who contributed significantly to America's intellectual and social life in the late nineteenth century. Kate Field was an outspoken advocate for the rights of black Americans and founder of the first woman's club in America. She campaigned to make Yosemite a national park and saved John Brown's Adirondack farm for the nation. The range of Field's activities should foster interest in her biography from students and scholars of nineteenth-century American literature, women's studies, journalism, and biography, and from both public and academic libraries.