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ISBN:184595128X
Author: Marsha Keith Schuchard
ISBN13: 978-1845951283
Title: Why Mrs Blake Cried: William Blake and the Erotic Imagination
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ePUB size: 1800 kb
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Language: English
Publisher: Pimlico (January 22, 2008)
Pages: 464

Why Mrs Blake Cried: William Blake and the Erotic Imagination by Marsha Keith Schuchard



William Blake's Sexual Path to Spiritual Vision. Marsha Keith Schuchard. 10 people found this helpful. This book will place Blake and Swedenborg, and others of lesser renown, into a rich historical context that includes Protestant and Kaballistic illuminatory traditions and practices, as well as the early cultural confluence of Eastern Buddhist and Tibetan traditions and practices with Western audiences. This is not a book for the squeamish or the moral fundamentalist, as these people will likely not be able to abide with the truths being revealed. For the rest of us, it will become a major cornerstone of Western literary and esoteric scholarship.

When William Blake died in 1827, his widow Catherine appointed Frederick Tatham his literary and artistic executor. No sooner had Tatham accepted the position than he was, in the words of William Michael Rossetti, brother of Dante Gabriel Rossetti, "beset" by "Swedenborgians, Irvingites, or other extreme sectaries", and compelled to thrust "a gag into the piteous mouth of Blake's corpse". The cast of characters is dizzying and the settings unlikely. Schuchard starts with the eccentric Count Zinzendorf, leader of the Moravians, who were involved in an "esoteric tradition of Christian Kabbalism, Hermetic alchemy, and Oriental mysticism". Schuchard's detailed book shows why Catherine cried but it also shows how, in the end, the Blakes achieved some harmony after all. About Author: Marsha Keith Schuchard, Ph.

Why Mrs Blake Cried offers a new insight into the work of Blake and takes us on an extraordinary journey through secret societies and ancient rituals. Результаты поиска по книге. Отзывы - Написать отзыв. Не удалось найти ни одного отзыва. Why Mrs Blake Cried The Sexual Basis. Marsha Keith Schuchard, Ph. D has written extensively on eighteenth-century Cabalistic and "illuminist" Freemasonry and its influence on Swift, Ramsay, Swedenborg, and Blake. She lives in Atlanta, Georgia. Библиографические данные. Why Mrs Blake Cried: William Blake and the Sexual Basis of Spiritual Vision.

Marsha Keith Schuchard. Written by a leading William Blake scholar, this is an intriguing and controversial history of the poet and artist, which reveals a world of waking visions, magical practices, sexual-spiritual experimentation, tantric sex and free love. Categories: Psychology\Love, erotic. Pages: 41. ISBN 10: 0712620168.

Why Mrs Blake Cried book. So why 4 instead of 3? Well, the topic is fantastic, and the actors even more so (Blake, Zinzerdorf, Swedenborg, what more can man ask?). Jan 24, 2018 Peter rated it really liked it. It's amazing that this book is 10 years old and it's still the last good book written about William Blake.

Marsha Keith Schuchard examines William Blake's unorthodox sex life in Why Mrs Blake Cried, says Jad Adams. Why Mrs Blake Cried: William Blake and the Sexual Basis of Spiritual Vision by Marsha Keith Schuchard 448pp, Century, £1. 9. She shows an (arguable) association of some of Blake's early work with people on the sexual scene of the day, including the quack Dr James Graham, with his virility-enhancing "celestial bed", and the mesmerists, who were accused of erotic titillation in the guise of therapy. It adds up to a fantastic miscellany of sex and mysticism, though sometimes Schuchard seems to be working hard to make the pieces of her jigsaw fit. Hardcover published 2006-03-02 in United Kingdom by Century. Alert if: New Price below. Schuchard reveals a weird esoteric, erotic and apocalyptic counterculture, brewing in what we otherwise consider the "enlightened" 18th century.

William Blake and the Erotic Imagination. by Marsha Keith Schuchard. The discovery of Blake family documents took Schuchard on a journey of detection that led her to a cast of radical characters including Cagliostro, Zinzendorf and the mystic Swedenborg, and to a world of waking visions, sexual-spiritual experimentation, kabbalistic magic, tantric sex and free love. Why Mrs Blake Cried offers a new insight into the work of Blake and takes us on an extraordinary journey through secret societies and ancient rituals. Biography & Autobiography Religion & Spirituality Nonfiction.

What made Mrs Blake cry was her husband's recourse to concubines if the marital bed did not provide sufficient ecstatic and prolonged potency. Keith Schuchard bravely explores the "sexual-spiritual underworld" of this great poet and artist, drawing on newly uncovered archives and photographic techniques that reveal the extreme eroticism of Blake's drawings before they were censored.

Written by a leading William Blake scholar, this is an intriguing and controversial history of the poet and artist, which reveals a world of waking visions, magical practices, sexual-spiritual experimentation, tantric sex and free love.From the Hardcover edition.
Reviews: 7
inform
While somewhat speculative in parts, this well researched yet readable book explores the Qabalistic and Tantric influences of the Moravian Church's missionary efforts in Africa, Arabia, Judah and the Jews of Europe on Emanuel Swedenborg and William Blake. Highly recommended, and many of the original sources cited are now easily available for your own interpretations on the web. Hope less expensive editions of her other research are eventually released, as this is well thought out and based on well documented sources.
Negal
This is an absolutely fascinating book! Although many in the Swedenborgian ("New Church") community may take exception to some of Dr. Schuchard's statements about Swedenborg's influences, the author has researched her subject for a great many years and has had access to material unknown to or deliberately ignored by others. It is a pity that Dr. Schuchard's original, unabridged manuscript could not have been published, but its length was apparently impractical for a commercial publisher to issue.

For anyone interested in the background of Blake's work, particularly his "prophetic" books, Dr. Schuchard's study is unquestionably required reading. For Swedenborgians who are open-minded enough to read this book without parochial preconceptions, there is extremely interesting material here that may shed light on the background of some of the more perplexing statements in "Conjugial Love."

Congratulations, Dr. Schuchard, on a book that will hopefully reach a much larger audience than your previous scholarly works, which also deserve to be carefully read, if one can afford to buy them!
Fearlesshunter
Interesting book
Siratius
Schuchard seems to understand very little about marriage or sexuality--or for that matter Blake. She hangs a flimsy hypothesis on very little in the way of evidence and confuses intellectual speculation with every day life and tabloid speculation with scholarly insight.

Really awful book.
Stanober
I am going to 'jump in' and give a preliminary review of Ms. Schuchard's new book based on the article of the same name she posted in the online journal Esoterica (Vol. II, 2000). I had previously read her marvelous book, Restoring the Temple: Cabalistic Freemasonry and Stuart Culture (Brill, 2002), and found her work is much in the vein of Dame Frances Yates, with great elucidation of the convergence of philosophical and historical context with scrupulous attention to detail based on primary-souce references.

Her article, and I assume her book will go into even greater detail, explored the diverse and sometimes tumultuous milieu of 18th century London and the esoteric circles of Moravians, Kaballists, and Occultists out of which were generated the magnificent visions and art of Swedenborg and William Blake. At the core of these esoteric influences were what can only be described as Christian/Kaballistic Tantric sexual practices that provided the operational energia for practitioners to achieve sublime heights of religious vision and experience. These also had their 'down side' for individual souls whose development could not compass the powers they sought to raise through their intensive practices. The detail with which she explores the spiritual/sexual methodology of Blake, Swedenborg, and their circle is almost unprecedented in Western scholarship (except perhaps for Arthur Versluis), but certainly welcome. It sheds important light on similar movements in 17th, 18th, and 19th century Europe and America.

Having read Blake and written papers on him as an undergraduate, I was always intrigued as to how he arrived at his incredible visions and exquisite art. This book will place Blake and Swedenborg, and others of lesser renown, into a rich historical context that includes Protestant and Kaballistic illuminatory traditions and practices, as well as the early cultural confluence of Eastern Buddhist and Tibetan traditions and practices with Western audiences. This is not a book for the squeamish or the moral fundamentalist, as these people will likely not be able to abide with the truths being revealed. For the rest of us, it will become a major cornerstone of Western literary and esoteric scholarship.
Thoginn
Suchard presents a thoroughly documented argument that bolsters the idea of William Blake's dedication to sex as a key to spiritual growth. Since so much of Blake's "controversial" writing and art was damaged or destroyed by the executors of his artistic estate, evidence in his own hand is spotty and subject to interpretation, at best. Then, since sexual repression dominated in his day, those involved with erotic expression had to keep much of their action and belief hidden from public examination. As a result, it is necessary to understand his thinking on spiritual sexuality by indirect means, by understanding the influences on him and seeing how they manifest in the work that survives. The author meticulously documents many of those influence, from his parents' involvement with Zinzendorf's Moravian church, through many of Blake's own associations and collaborations.

Despite the amazing amount of effort and scholarship brought to bear, knowledge of Blake's sexual beliefs and practices remains vague, and many conjectures remain just that - conjecture. Much of the argument remains circumstantial. The fact that Blake could have been exposed to some influence doesn't mean that he was; the fact that he knew of some potentially scandalous esoterica doesn't mean that he immersed himself in it. And, since no real record remains of how Blake did or did not act on these beliefs, the indirection of available evidence could easily become misdirection.

Suchard's historical sleuthing turned up many remarkable records relating to Blake and his influences. On the whole, though, too many pieces remain missing from this puzzle for me to believe wholly in the picture that Suchard claims to see.

-- wiredweird