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ISBN:1608445631
Author: Archibald L. Patterson
ISBN13: 978-1608445639
Title: Between Hitler and Stalin: The Quick Life and Secret Death of Edward Smigly Rydz, Marshal of Poland
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ePUB size: 1219 kb
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Language: English
Publisher: Dog Ear Publishing, LLC (July 16, 2010)
Pages: 240

Between Hitler and Stalin: The Quick Life and Secret Death of Edward Smigly Rydz, Marshal of Poland by Archibald L. Patterson



He also left behind a secret which undermined Germany's war effort and fostered Hitler's own defeat. Dr. Archibald Patterson holds degrees from Harvard and three other American universities (North Carolina, Southern Methodist, and Georgia. He was born in California and lives now in Tennessee.

When Edward Śmigły-Rydz appeared on its September 1939 cover, Time Magazine described him as a scholar-technician. has been added to your Cart. What is perhaps the most interesting figure of this book is the way Patterson cleverly shows that everything the "allies" of Poland did to this country -practically lefting it alone in its struggle against Hitler's Germany- happens against them a few moths later. This books is aimed to wider audiences, and is very easy to read, not only the chapters related to the political issues but also the ones that covers with very sharp details the military campaings.

Taken from - Between Hitler and Stalin – The Quick Life and Secret Death of Edward Smigly-Rydz Marshall of Poland by Archibald L Patterson. Pre war planning envisaged a slow Polish pull back into south eastern Poland where they would hang on till the Western allies intervened in some way shape or form. The western allies were planning for a long war and had written Poland off before the war even started. Top. 10 posts, Page 1 of 1. Return to Poland 1919-1945. Jump to. Axis History.

Marshal Edward Rydz-Śmigły told a cheering crowd of 100,000 that "violence inflicted by force must be resisted by force" and that Poland's conduct with regard to Danzig "will be adjusted to the conduct of the other side. August 7, 1939 (Monday). Between Hitler and Stalin: The Quick Life and Secret Death of Edward Smigly-Rydz, Marshal of Poland. p. 140. ISBN 978-1-60844-563-9.

Filename: Between Hitler and Stalin: The Quick Life and Secret Death of Edward Smigly Rydz, Marshal of Poland by Archibald Patterson. No such file No such user exist File not found.

Between Hitler and Stalin. July 18, 2018 Archibald L. Patterson. The Quick Life and Secret Death of Edward Smigly Rydz, Marshal of Poland Author: Archibald L. Patterson Publisher: Dog Ear Publishing ISBN: 1608445631 Category: Biography & Autobiography Page: 240 View: 6404. Continue Reading →. When Edward mig y-Rydz appeared on its September1939 cover, Time Magazine described him as "a scholar-technician," "graceful, versatile, serious," "with a professor's inquisitive" mind.

Marshal Edward Rydz-Smigly. Meet the man who started world war II. By Mike King. The death of Pilsudki proved to be a great loss for Germany - a fact which Hitler himself expressed during the closing days of World War II. 1- Hitler attends a Berlin Memorial Service held in honor of Pilsudski, whom he respected greatly.

Between Hitler and Stalin: The Quick Life. by Archibald L. When Edward Śmigły-Rydz appeared on its September 1939 cover, Time Magazine described him as "a scholar-technician," "graceful, versatile, serious," "with a professorʼs inquisitive" mind. This was the man who was. by Tadeusz N. Cieplak Stanley S. Seidner Barbara J. Tepa Yvonne Grabowski Richard C. Lukas Aleksander Gella John Crompton Frank Mocha.

Between Hitler And Stalin The Quick Life And Secret Death Of Edward Smigly Rydz Marshal Of Poland.

Between Hitler and Stalin: The Quick Life and Secret Death of Edward Smigly Rydz, Marshal of Poland. Archibald L. Public Pension Administration. Publisher: University of Georgia, Carl Vinson Institute of Government.

When Edward Śmigły-Rydz appeared on its September1939 cover, Time Magazine described him as "a scholar-technician," "graceful, versatile, serious," "with a professor's inquisitive" mind. This was the man who was leading Poland's resistance to Hitler's invasion. An impoverished orphan he had risen to his country's highest military rank, admonishing his people, "To the Germans we would lose our freedom; to the Russians we would lose our souls." In 1920 he had led a maneuver which defeated a westward surge by Russia's Red Army and had humiliated Joseph Stalin, but in 1939 Hitler and Stalin combined to overrun Poland. Interned, Śmigły-Rydz escaped, and despite a widespread manhunt, eluded his pursuers. In the end, he left behind a cryptic poem: "All around me are pensive crosses, black from smoke..." He also left behind a secret which undermined Germany's war effort and fostered Hitler's own defeat. Dr. Archibald Patterson holds degrees from Harvard and three other American universities (North Carolina, Southern Methodist, and Georgia.) He has been Assistant Director and operations manager, Government Accountability Office (GAO,) and Associate Professor, Troy State University - Europe, where he taught for six years, principally in Germany, but as far a field as Turkey. He was born in California and lives now in Tennessee.
Reviews: 4
Gandree
Archibald Patterson has done an excellent job writing a very detailed history of the circumstances surrounding the personality of Rydz, Marshall of Poland, and the hard times he had to live in the prewar Poland and during the days after the war exploded.

What is perhaps the most interesting figure of this book is the way Patterson cleverly shows that everything the "allies" of Poland did to this country -practically lefting it alone in its struggle against Hitler's Germany- happens against them a few moths later.

This books is aimed to wider audiences, and is very easy to read, not only the chapters related to the political issues but also the ones that covers with very sharp details the military campaings.
ZEr0
There is a vast literature on WWII as seen from London and Berlin. This biography of the Polish Marshal who led his country in 1939 offers a view of the war from Warsaw. The Poles were not only trapped between Hitler and Stalin, they were trapped in a dilemma.
Smigly-Rydz comes across as a split personality, a cultivated man educated as an artist who fought and excelled in all the battles that led to Poland's independence. Then, stabbed in the chest by Hitler and in the back by Stalin, he made a series of controversial decisions that plagued him until his death and sullied his reputation.
He lived a fast paced life and the book captures that as well as offering vignettes of the lives of the major personalities, many colorful, with whom Smigly-Rydz crossed paths. It is an easy read, and brings to life much of the tumultuous history of Poland in the twentieth century.
Miromice
Not a fan of military history, I read this book because I wanted to know more about the history of Poland in the first half of the 20th century, as my partner is a woman with partly Polish roots. In this regard, I found this book highly informative!!
This book is clearly written and in a style which makes it difficult to put this book down when the clock says I must do so!
Even though I am often disgusted by accounts of military history and bloody battles. those parts of this book are made so interesting and non-offensive that I did not want to skim over them to get to more pleasant prose.
This book is full of fascinating tidbits about life and conditions in Poland at the time that make it a treasure trove for anyone who wants to learn more about Poland in the first half of the 20th century!!
This is a book I definitely want to keep!!
Prof. Dr. Winfield Hutton
Seattle, WA.The Polish Way: A Thousand-Year History of the Poles and Their Culture
Fenrinos
Were these reviews that gave this "book" positives solicited? This book is anything but history. There is no evidence in the rather rambling text that the author used any primary sources first hand, let alone others he listed in the bibliography. Did the author rely on the sources cited in Bethell, for example? Author's usually cite their sources as footnotes or endnotes to indicate the origins of their research, and, moreso, to avoid plaigarism.The narrative is disjointed, and the prose in many at times lacking connection (e.g., Martha Dodd sequence, pp. 108-109.) Any serious attempt toward historiography would have seriously explored primary and secondary sources with more rigor. It would have also critically distinguished between the subjective opinion of others and historical fact. If the author cannot read Polish, at least he should have cited Seidner's comprehensive article on Marshal Smigly Rydz in exile in the Polish Review from the late 1970's (in English), Pilsudski's "Year 1920," Jedrzejewicz's Lukasiewicz papers ("Diplomat in Paris"), and Wynot's "The Camp of National Unity and the Struggle for Power", among many others. in conclusion, the volume is a poor rehash of events that had been better recounted in better written volumes. Overall, the book is not passable as a serious work even for even a general audience.