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Download Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Love (Windsor Selection) epub book
ISBN:0754014134
Author: Dava Sobel
ISBN13: 978-0754014133
Title: Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Love (Windsor Selection)
Format: mbr lrf txt mobi
ePUB size: 1427 kb
FB2 size: 1406 kb
DJVU size: 1832 kb
Language: English
Category: Memoirs
Publisher: Chivers (June 2000)
Pages: 571

Galileo's Daughter: A Historical Memoir of Science, Faith, and Love (Windsor Selection) by Dava Sobel



Galileo's Daughter also presents a stunning portrait of a person hitherto lost to history, described by her father as "a woman of exquisite mind, singular goodness, and most tenderly attached to m. The son of a musician, Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) tried at first to enter a monastery before engaging the skills that made him the foremost scientist of his da. With all the human drama and scientific adventure that distinguished Dava Sobel's previous book Longitude, Galileo's Daughter is an unforgettable story.

In Galileo's Daughter, Dava Sobel (author of the bestselling Longitude) tells the story of the famous scientist and his illegitimate daughter, Sister Maria Celeste

This book, entitled Galileo's Daughter is a dual biography, both of Galileo and of his eldest daughter, a cloistered nun of the Poor Clares. It is also in part a fascinating chronicle of a 17th Century clash between Science and Catholic doctrine; arguably the most historically significant and intense battle between religious belief and scientific knowledge. He had thought for a long time that Copernicus was correct in postulating that the Earth revolves around the sun, and with Galileo's mathematical skills and the scientific instruments he had invented, he was able to establish proof. Maria's letters show the wavering stages of approval and disapproval of Galileo's conclusions by the Catholic Church. At first his theories were welcomed, then seen as a challenge to the Catholic faith; the greatest threat since Martin Luther.

In Galileo's Daughter, Dava Sobel (author of the bestselling Longitude ) tells the story of the famous scientist and his illegitimate daughter, Sister Maria Celeste.

Personal Name: Sobel, Dava. Publication, Distribution, et. Toronto On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Galileo's daughter : a historical memoir of science, faith, and love, Dava Sobel.

It was well worth reading a second time. Sobel is a great writer and has the ability to give us the love between father and daughter. This book is doubly wonderful if you've visited Florence, Tuscany, Venice or Rome. Those areas play a big role in the book. If you have an interest in science then the book is even richer. If you haven't read about Galileo since the typical short historical introduction gained in high school, as I have, this book will be truly eye opening. The life of this scientist, astronomer and philosopher is full of intrigue and drama fit for a work of fiction. It is unbelievable that Galileo was able to accomplish so much given his life's experiences.

Galileo’s Daughter is neither a new book nor about evolution, but it exemplifies the nature of science and illuminates the interaction between science and society. Dava Sobel has written two popular science books: Longitude and Galileo’s Daughter. She has a long career as a science writer and in these books, she not only gives clear, basic explanations of the science but also provides a rich social and political context for this scientific work.

Includes bibliographical references (p. -382) and index.

Galileo's Daughter is the story of the relationship between the great Italian scientist Galileo and his daughter, by the author of Longitude. Galileo Galilei (1564-1642) was the foremost scientist of his day. His inventions and discoveries were heralded around the world. His telescopes allowed him to reveal a new reality in the heavens and to defend the astounding proposition that the earth actually moves around the Sun. For this belief was tried for heresy and threatened with torture. Galileo is brought to life here as never before -- a man boldly compelled to explain the truths he discovered, human in his frailties and faith, devoted to his family and, especially, to his daughter. Since there could be no hope of marriage for his illegitimate daughter Galileo placed her, aged thirteen, in the convent of San Mateo in Arcetri. She was perhaps her father's equal in brilliance, industry and sensibility, and she proved to be his greatest source of strength through his most difficult years. Dava Sobel reveals the short life of Sister Marie Celeste through the 120 letters the nun wrote to her father from 1623 to her death ten years later from exposure, malnutrition and a broken heart at the age of 33 years. The letters reveal a loving relationship, a mutual passion for science and a unique insight into early modern history, all woven into Dava Sobel's compelling narrative. Galileo's Daughter tells the story of the most dramatic collision in history between science and religion. Sobel illuminates an entire era, when one man fought to reconcile the Heaven he revered as a good Catholic with the heavens he revealed through his telescope. Galileo's Daughter is a rich and unforgettable story.
Reviews: 7
Pruster
I appreciated the historical value of this book. I have always heard about Galileo; however, as I got into the book, I realized I had no knowledge of his life and who he was as an individual. One hard fact in the book was that, according to the custom of the day and due to the fact that Gallileo could not provide dowries for his two daughters, they were placed in a convent. At ages between twelve and fourteen, they took their vows - and never left the convent again, nor saw their father except through an iron grate! The book is based on the correspondence between Galileo and his oldest daughter. Although his letters were destroyed, hers carried his story and revealed the great love and respect between the two. The author's phenominal research revealed the brilliance of Galileo's mind and the depth of his faith to pursue truth even though he was labeled a heretic, for which he endured great suffering.
Priotian
This is more of a biography of Galileo through the eyes of his daughter Suor Maria Celeste than a true memoir of her life. What I liked best is Sobel's ability to illuminate daily life and preoccupations, even those of a respected mathematician, in the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries. Even Galileo had to worry about paying the mortgage, and his financial success depended on the whim of powerful men. It was fascinating to see how people tried to deal with scourges like the plague, including Maria Celeste's remedies combined with prayer.
Narder
Some parts were incredibly - don't put down the book - interesting while others no so needed. But on the whole they together created a word picture of the times and life in that period. I especially enjoyed the science connections and found the church impact critical to the story. Galileo was brilliant but brought to his knees by the church leaders. We know these facts in abstract and this was a great illustration.
Nikok
I read this book when it came out and loved it. For some reason, though, I decided to read it again recently. I found the second read much more enjoyable than the first one.

This book contains so much information on Galileo, his work, and daily life during the time. The way Sobel weaves in the daughter's letters is amazing. She brings in the church and convent life. Of course, the church plays a big role as Galileo ages.

I love this book. It was well worth reading a second time. Sobel is a great writer and has the ability to give us the love between father and daughter.

This book is doubly wonderful if you've visited Florence, Tuscany, Venice or Rome. Those areas play a big role in the book. If you have an interest in science then the book is even richer. Love it!!
Ces
If you haven't read about Galileo since the typical short historical introduction gained in high school, as I have, this book will be truly eye opening. The life of this scientist, astronomer and philosopher is full of intrigue and drama fit for a work of fiction. It is unbelievable that Galileo was able to accomplish so much given his life's experiences. The ability to meet him through the eyes of his equally impressive daughter and his colleagues makes this book a true gem. Don't miss it!
thrust
This was an interesting book to me, because I knew little of the history of that period of what became Italy, and little of Galileo's story. Much of the story is told through letters that his daughter wrote to him from her convent, with of course other documentation and some "Fill in the blanks guess work." The story of this genius as told here is a sad one, but he was a remarkable man and the book is definitely worth reading.
Perdana
I wanted to like this book but couldn't make it through to the end. I was hoping to learn more about Maria Celeste and less about Galileo and his quest to support Copernicus' theory of the Universe. That was interesting to a point but unless the reader was a student of physics or astronomy it was quite dry in places. The letters were works of art and written with such respect for her father but they were few and far between. I did feel, however, that it gave a clear picture of what it was like to be a female in the 1500's, very bleak indeed.
One of my favorite books. It's touching, it's educational, and it's absolutely hilarious at points. If you are at all involved in making change happen and run into obstacles, read this. and.. by the way, Sobel does a very good job at the whole story behind the Pope's difficulty with Galileo's work.