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ISBN:0394512634
Author: Clive James
ISBN13: 978-0394512631
Title: Unreliable Memoirs
Format: mobi azw lrf lit
ePUB size: 1283 kb
FB2 size: 1704 kb
DJVU size: 1259 kb
Language: English
Category: Memoirs
Publisher: Random House; First American Edition edition (1981)
Pages: 171

Unreliable Memoirs by Clive James



To Rhoisin and Bruce Beresford. and the getting of wisdom. Andromache led the lamentation of the women, while she held in her hands the head of Hector, her great warrior: ‘Husband, you are gone so young from life, and leave me in your home a widow. Iliad, xxiv, translated by S. E. Winbolt, from The Iliad Pocket Book, Constable 1911. 1. The Kid from Kogarah. 2. Valley of the Killer Snakes. 4. The Force of Destruction.

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This item:Unreliable Memoirs by Clive James Paperback £. 9. Only 10 left in stock (more on the way). Falling Towards England : Unreliable Memoirs II by Clive James Paperback £. Only 4 left in stock (more on the way). May Week Was In June (Unreliable Memoirs) by Clive James Paperback £. Only 3 left in stock (more on the way). I really enjoy Clive James dry delivery on TV and it continues in this book with his recollections on his early childhood and his exploits living in the back of beyond. Well written and a light hearted look back to his early days.

About Clive James: Librarian Note: There is more than one author in the GoodReads database with this name. See this thread for more information  . Clive James isn't a Goodreads Author (yet), but he does have a blog, so here are some recent posts imported from his feed. An Essay by Julian Gough.

Paperback Ebook Paperback. In the first instalment of Clive James's memoirs we follow the young Clive on his journey from boyhood to the cusp of manhood, when his days of wearing short trousers are finally behind him. Battling with school, girls, various relatives and an overwhelming desire to be a superhero, Clive's adventures growing up in the suburbs of post-war Sydney are hair-raising, uproarious and almost too good to be true. Told with James's unassailable sense of humour and self-effacing charm, Unreliable Memoirs is a hilarious and touching introduction to the story of a national treasure

Clive James does a fantastic job in setting up many of the anecdotes he relates in the various chapters here. However, as an American who is merely semi-well traveled, I did not get many of the inside jokes. It is easy to see how funny this book could be if you really were tracking with the culture he grew up in. This, however, is more of the reader's problem rather than the writer's.

Read "Unreliable Memoirs Picador Classic" by Clive James with Rakuten Kobo. With an introduction by P. J. O'Rourke 'Do not read this book in public  . Told with James's unassailable sense of humour and self-effacing charm, Unreliable Memoirs is a hilarious and touching introduction to the story of a national treasure. A million-copy bestseller, this classic memoir is a celebration of life in all its unpredictable glory.

Perhaps his most brilliant book yet, The Blaze of Obscurity tells the inside story of his years in television: it shows Clive James on top form – both then and now. ‘In the case of many people who attempt an autobiography even a single volume is one too many. In the case of Clive James, the volumes now in existence are too few. If the.

A best-selling classic around the world, Clive Jamesâ?™s hilarious memoir has long been unavailable in the United States.

Before James Frey famously fabricated his memoir, Clive James wrote a refreshingly candid book that made no claims to be accurate, precise, or entirely truthful, only to entertain. In an exercise of literary exorcism, James set out to put his childhood in Australia behind him by rendering it as part novel, part memoir. Now, nearly thirty years after it first came out in England, Unreliable Memoirs is again available to American readers and sure to attract a whole new generation that has, through his essays and poetry, come to love Jamesâ?™s inimitable voice.

Reviews: 7
Simple
I really enjoyed this book, read it in two days, the description of life in Australia then is so different to life for children growing up in todays world, and although the stories are "unreliable", the reality would have been very close. My disappointment was in actual fact the "unreliable" part. I wanted to be reading this as a real story, and had to keep bringing myself back to the reality that a lot of this was not true. Disappointing but I knew before I started reading that it wasn't exactly reality,but there is a part of you that wants it to be. I guess if I wrote a story of my life the memory would have altered to what had really happened. Entertaining and a great commentary on the time and the places. Any Sydneysider would enjoy visiting the places of their childhood through this book. I now want to read the rest of his books.
Iell
I have to confess that I read this book over a considerable period of time picking it up occasionally and then finally finishing the last half recently. It's very clever and, at times anyway, laugh out loud funny. That's a fairly rare quality in a book. I couldn't decide on four or five stars as it's well written (of course, being Clive James),very readable and very funny. I settled on the four because obviously it didn't engage me enough to read it right through immediately. On the other hand it is the sort of book you can pick up and put down again being really a series of episodes in James life. I won't presume to review Clive James but if you are familiar with him you will probably love this book.
iSlate
Entertaining numerous but sometimes it got a bit hard to stay interested
Frdi
Was reading this book on a long-haul flight between Auckland and London. The people in the next seats were looking at me as if I was mad. Shoulders shaking with laughter and a head full of supressed giggles for almost the entire flight!! They wanted to know what was so funny, and will probably end up buying their own copies of Unreliable Memoirs. I have rarely enjoyed a book so much, and although I was brought up at the other end of our planet, there was so much that reminded me of my own childhood - except for the spiders, snakes, sharks and sunny hot weather..................
VAZGINO
I've read this book a number of times over the years. This is probably my third copy of it having lost the others when loaning it to people. Its a good book, funny and well written. It loses its way towards the end and the best material is in the first two thirds, but overall its well worth reading.
ALAN
The book written by Clive James describing his early years of growing up in 1950's in Australia.
There are some interesting pieces of history. It was surprisingly funny in parts.
If you are a Clive James fan you will enjoy reading this book
Dynen
As a person unfamiliar with Australian geography and even less familiar with Australian cultural references, I merely liked this book. Clive James does a fantastic job in setting up many of the anecdotes he relates in the various chapters here. However, as an American who is merely semi-well traveled, I did not get many of the inside jokes. It is easy to see how funny this book could be if you really were tracking with the culture he grew up in.

This, however, is more of the reader's problem rather than the writer's. The tales related range from sadly familiar (dead father, incredibly caring mother, indifferent son) to some of the truly funniest writing imaginable (trying to tackle a world class rugby player; a chapter entitled The Sound of Mucus). James is really great. There are stories in here that everyone can relate to and it is all told in a way that is sharp in sensational details and vague on everything in between. If I could dump my memories into a book, this is probably what it would be like; only less funny and more stupidly written.

Broaden your horizons and read the book. It is a short read and will have you looking something up in Wikipedia at least once every few minutes.
Having recently (Sept 2013) watched Kerrie O'Brien's interview on the ABC (Australia) I realised that I'd never read Clive James' memoirs even though I've always enjoyed his wit. I finished this volume in about a day and was left keen to hear about his exploits in the UK as a young man, so quickly downloaded Falling Towards England. I grew up not far from where Clive James spent his youth, though some years later and was full of nostalgia in remembering Sydney's southern suburbs when they were less busy and such innocent suburbs to be living in. I laughed out loud so often while I was reading and had to frequently read out passages to my bemused husband to bring him in on the joke. Clive James' self-deprecating sense of humour would have you believe that he was a no-hoper much of the time, which of course simply can't have been true. In not taking himself too seriously you feel that you get to know the boy and the man. This was a feel-good read.