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ISBN:0826219322
Author: Ira Sukrungruang
ISBN13: 978-0826219329
Title: Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy
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ePUB size: 1626 kb
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Language: English
Category: Memoirs
Publisher: University of Missouri; First edition (January 25, 2011)
Pages: 184

Talk Thai: The Adventures of Buddhist Boy by Ira Sukrungruang



Ira Sukrungruang ha Talk Thai: Adventures of Buddhist Boy. Children need rules. These rules need to be clear-cut and easily understood to be followed. Ira Sukrungruang was one of my daughter's professor's at SUNY Oswego, so this is how I came to read this book. It's a slender memoir of his early years growing up in Chicago with parents and "Aunty Sue", who was really a friend of his mother and not an actual relative

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In Talk Thai, Ira Sukrungruang gives readers a fresh, funny, and poignant perspective on childhood, identity, cultural confusion, and growing up Thai American. This is a gem of a memoir. Bich Minh Nguyen, author of Stealing Buddha’s Dinner and Short Girls. This is the kind of book that cuts right to the bone without feeling like the writer is trying too hard. A refreshing look at the immigrant experience in the . with an insider's exploration of Thai culture in America. An excellent read, the kind one returns to again and again and again.

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Lee Ann Roripaugh, Tiffany Midge, Ira Sukrungruang, Megan Kaminski, Sean Johnston. At the USF/Sweet Table. Barrie Jean Borich, Ira Sukrungruang, Dinah Lenney, Judith Kitchen, Paul Lisicky) Authentic voice. However we describe the sound and texture of that slip-slide between our actual lives and the versions of ourselves we create for the page, this palpable human presence is what distinguishes creative nonfiction from the other genres. This panel of nonfiction writers will discuss the intimacy, intellect, and identity of this naked I-part actuality, part construction, always individual, and wholly what the genre is all about.

When Ira Sukrungruang was born to Thai parents newly arrived in the . they picked his Jewish moniker out of a book of "American" names. ISBN13:9780826219329.

Author: Ira Sukrungruang. It was for a class that I’m currently taking. they picked his Jewish moniker out of a book of 'American' names. Young Ira may have lived in Oak Lawn, Illinois, but inside the family's bi-level home was 'Thailand with American conveniences

When Ira Sukrungruang was born to Thai parents newly arrived in the . they picked his Jewish moniker out of a book of American names. Young Ira may have lived in Oak Lawn, Illinois, but inside the family’s bi-level home was Thailand with American conveniences.

That once you were a boy and did boy things and your father and his callused hand touched the back of your hare neck and squeezed, and it felt like he was passing all he had into you, all his other lives, all his other sorrows, and when his hand left what remained was its phantom warmth. That once you rolled out of a moving car with a doughnut in your mouth; that the accident was so quick you didn’t shop chewing. That your dog brings her velvet head under your hand, even when you are despondent because the world has broken its promises  . Topics: Books, In the magazine, poetry.

On one side of the door, the rich smell of sweet, spicy food and the calm of Buddhist devotion; on the other, the strangeness of a new land. When Ira Sukrungruang was born to Thai parents newly arrived in the U.S., they picked his Jewish moniker out of a book of “American” names. In this lively, entertaining, and often hilarious memoir, he relates the early life of a first-generation Thai-American and his constant, often bumbling attempts to reconcile cultural and familial expectations with the trials of growing up in 1980s America. Young Ira may have lived in Oak Lawn, Illinois, but inside the family’s bi-level home was “Thailand with American conveniences.” They ate Thai food, spoke the Thai language, and observed Thai customs. His bedtime stories were tales of Buddha and monkey-faced demons. On the first day of school his mother reminded him that he had a Siamese warrior’s eyes—despite his thick glasses—as Aunty Sue packed his Muppets lunch box with fried rice. But when his schoolmates played tag he was always It, and as he grew, he faced the constant challenge of reconciling American life with a cardinal family rule: “Remember, you are Thai.” Inside the Thai Buddhist temple of Chicago, another “simulated Thailand,” are more rules, rules different from those of the Southside streets, and we see mainstream Western religion—“god people”—through the Sukrungruang family’s eyes. Within the family circle, we meet a mother who started packing for her return to Thailand the moment she arrived; her best friend, Aunty Sue, Ira’s second mother, who lives with and cooks for the family; and a wayward father whose dreams never quite pan out.Talk Thai is a richly told account that takes us into an immigrant’s world. Here is a story imbued with Thai spices and the sensibilities of an American upbringing, a story in which Ira practices English by reciting lines from TV sitcoms and struggles with the feeling of not belonging in either of his two worlds. For readers who delight in the writings of Amy Tan, Gish Jen, and other Asian-Americans, Talk Thai provides generous portions of a still-mysterious culture while telling the story of an American boyhood with humor, playfulness, and uncompromising honesty.
Reviews: 7
Tenius
Talk Thai is a story worth savoring, worth taking your time on. Another reviewer says that it is "captivating," and I agree. I had the flu for five days, and I spent those days involved in the world of this book. When it was over, I was both satisfied and ready for more, more gorgeous lyric paragraphs, more funny scenes that display big truths, more of the author and his life. This is the kind of book that can be whatever you want it to be: a story, a lesson, a truth, an adventure. It's a great read and experience!
SARAND
This witty, thoughtful and timely book tells a great story of what it was like for the author to grow up struggling between being Thai in America and walking the balance between striving to please two very different sets of people. I still laugh when thinking back on some of the language struggles he had as they are common to many of my friends! Well worth the price!!!
Frdi
Really a very enjoyable read.
Sharpmane
very relatable very our half-thai family
Dorizius
This book is charming and well written; you will fall in love with this little boy and the way the grown up writes about his life in an immigrant family. Charming and well worth the read.
MrRipper
Talk Thai refreshes the assimilation struggle for us, and it does so with such goodhearted verve that we want to break down our personal and cultural barriers, open ourselves up, and find a joyous commonality in all. It's a great read, brimming with humor, warmth, and art.
JoJoshura
Very funny, but serious too. I was pleasantly surprised by Sukrungruang's ability to weave humor, passion, and good storytelling in this memoir. This is the kind of book that cuts right to the bone without feeling like the writer is trying too hard. A refreshing look at the immigrant experience in the U.S. with an insider's exploration of Thai culture in America. An excellent read, the kind one returns to again and again and again. I recommend this book to anyone and everyone.
A gem. I doled it out in small bites so that it would not end. Honest, difficult and poetic all at the same time.