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ISBN:0808569465
Author: Bernard Edelman
ISBN13: 978-0808569466
Title: Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam
Format: lit mbr docx doc
ePUB size: 1479 kb
FB2 size: 1152 kb
DJVU size: 1799 kb
Language: English
Category: Leaders and Notable People
Publisher: Rebound by Sagebrush (January 1988)

Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam by Bernard Edelman



An overwhelmingly eloquent book of the purest and most simple writing on Vietnam. Bernard Edelman served as a broadcast dent in Vietnam. Dear America" is a collection of letters back home from men-and women- in Vietnam. DA is split up into 8 sections, giving the reader a decent exposure into what guys went through over there. Describing Vietnam in writing to someone who never came within 15,000 miles of the place is virtually impossible but the letters herein do a good job in this regard. The most poignant section in the final one.

Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam is a 1987 American documentary film inspired by the anthology of the same title, directed by Bill Couturié in 1987. Using real letters written by American soldiers (which can be read in the book along with many more) and archive footage, the film creates a highly personal experience of the Vietnam War. The film won the Special Jury Prize: Documentary at the Sundance Film Festival in 1988. It was also screened out of competition at the 1988 Cannes Film Festival.

More than 200 letters home from Vietnam era servicemen to family, friends, and others have been selected for publication in this volume about the most intimate thoughts of the soldiers who served in Vietnam.

Home Browse Books Book details, Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam. Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam. Of the . million men and women who served in Vietnam during the war, New York City provided one of the largest contingents. They came from every neighborhood in the city, from all ethnic groups and all walks of life. The service that they saw was as varied as their backgrounds, and the vast majority of them performed their duties to the best of their ability.

Author: Bernard Edelman. Title: Dear America : Letters Home From Vietnam. Send report: This is a good book. Help us to make General-Ebooks better! Genres.

More than 25 years after the official end of the Vietnam War, "Dear America" allows readers to witness the war firsthand through the eyes of the men and women who served there. Excerpt in "Time" magazine. Heart gripping, personal and emotional letters home from war. By Thriftbooks. com User, November 30, 1997. This book is one of the hardest books I have ever had to read. To know some of these men would never return home and to read emotional letters home to their girlfriends, parents and friends, made reading very hard with tears in my eyes. As a VietNam veteren I could relate to some of those feelings expressed in the letters.

Using real letters Written By US soldiers (which can be read in the book along with many more) and archive footage, the film creates a highly personal experience of the Vietnam War. The film won the Special Jury Prize: Documentary at Sundance Film Festival in 1988. Tags: War Documentary. This is the rare musical that has first-act rather than second-act problems.

Nearly forty years after the official end of the Vietnam War, Dear America allows us to witness the war firsthand through the eyes of the men and women who served in Vietnam.

html?hl ru&id DSoGwaPqfqQC. More than twenty-five years after the official end of the Vietnam War, Dear America allows us to witness the war firsthand through the eyes of the men and women who served in Vietnam. He is the author of Centenarians: The Story of the 20th Century by the Americans Who Lived It. Библиографические данные. Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam Norton paperback.

Book by Edelman, Bernard
Reviews: 7
caster
"Dear America" is a collection of letters back home from men-and women- in Vietnam. DA is split up into 8 sections, giving the reader a decent exposure into what guys went through over there. For the record, this reviewer was in country from July '70-July '71. (Most vets dropped the "19" when it came to their years over there). Describing Vietnam in writing to someone who never came within 15,000 miles of the place is virtually impossible but the letters herein do a good job in this regard.

The most poignant section in the final one. These are letters from guys, including one female, who did not make it home. This reviewer was pained to read of the Army nurse from Canton, Ohio who was killed when her hospital was mortared. For the record, 8 military women were killed during the War. Their names are on the Wall. Reading about soldiers who were just weeks away from homecoming before dying is excruciating. Being a "short timer" over there was the most sensitive of subjects.

This reviewer will stop at this point but not without adding one personal note: He should his lucky stars every day that he was not in the infantry and escaped the worst over there. He is also lucky that he did not extend his tour to get an early discharge. The Army dangled that little sweetener and some guys who grabbed it-including at least two in these pages -were killed during their extension. Apologies: A good review should exclude personal tales, but this is Vietnam! Some reminiscing is hard to avoid.

There are so many superior Vietnam writings out there. "Dear America" is yet another. It is fully recommended for its insight into that conflict that affected so many of us.
Morlurne
I was searching for those soldiers that lived and died with my ex husband of 3 decades, when a Vietnam Marine recommended this book. My search led me to trying to understand the different PTSD for those who enlisted and those drafted. I was sure that there is a difference. Also I can not understand how these Vets are not part of the Crisis Intervention teams and how they are not Certified PTSD Veterans Counselors. For the life of the names on the Wall, how are we grouping this PTSD with all the others? If, the Vietnam Vets were asked to discuss their bonds to their Service, they could have devised good guidelines to reclaim our Service People.
This author was in Vietnam when my ex husband lost friends, including his best friend. He came home and never picked up a gun again, because guns are weapons used for only one thing - to kill. We, as a society could have learned much from our Vets but especially those Vietnam Vets. I have all the letters he wrote to me from Nam. I haven't looked at those since 1970, because of the tortured soul who wrote to me.
I plan on watching the documentary associated with this book.
Thank you Bernard Edelman and everyone who left their letters at The Wall or shared with another.
Malodor
The basis for the HBO production of the same name, _Dear America_ provides a glimpse into the Vietnam war through letters home by the young men and women who served. The book is broken into seven sections, each portraying a different view of the war, from first impressions ("Cherries"), to life in the field ("Humping the Boonies") to "quiet" life in the rear with the gear ("Base Camp"). The editors include a variety of voices both enlisted and officer from all branches of service (and some from other civilian volunteers). Taken as a whole, the book does a solid job of showing the sweep and scope of experiences.

Similar to Since You Went Away: World War II Letters from American Women on the Home Front - a collection of letters from the "home front" in World War II, _Letters Home from Vietnam_ is intensely personal, powerful and moving, all the more so because the editors tell what happened to the writers after the war - many moved on to successful careers in the civilian world in all manner of occupations. Some died in the conflict. Knowing what the future held for the letter writers makes the letters all the more powerful in the reading.

An excellent resource in teaching history and as a collection of primary documents, it is also a haunting reminder of the personal sacrifice Vietnam demanded of those who served.
Chuynopana
I cannot say enough things about this book. I discovered it years ago and wore out that paperback copy. I ordered this again as a permament edition to my library. I have not read a compilation of letters or journal entries from any time period that matches or comes close to the wonderful job Mr. Edleman did in putting this book together,

What the reader gets from this book would depend on many factors -- are they military or former military, are they anti-war proponents, or particularly interested in the Viet Nam era. Personally, I watched my father serve three tours (one in 1963 as an advisor to the French as it was his second language, once in 1965 when he was wounded and spent a year at the hospital in Fort Campbell, Kentucky, and again in 1971. As a military child, I was keenly aware of the effects of the war on my mother, myself, and the mother and children who lived on the base during this time of great death and sorrow. Mr. Edelman starts out with the "newbies" and ends with the aftermath the war had on families.

I would recommend this book to anyone. It is filled with very personal and intimate details of so many young men and women who served.
Beydar
Few books touched me as much as Dear America: Letters Home from Vietnam. I was a teenager/young adult while this war took place, and each letter reminded me of someone I knew. The common theme of each of the writers was their sense of duty to their country despite the hardships. There are funny letters, and heartbreaking letters and each should be honored.