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ISBN:0820309079
Author: William Garrett Piston
ISBN13: 978-0820309071
Title: Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant
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ePUB size: 1506 kb
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Language: English
Category: Leaders and Notable People
Publisher: University of Georgia Press; 1st edition (May 1, 1988)
Pages: 272

Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant by William Garrett Piston



7/3/0924 19. Personal Name: Piston, William Garrett. Publication, Distribution, et. Athens. University of Georgia Press, (c)1987. Baltimore, Md. : Project MUSE, 2015). The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners.

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Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant. William Garrett Piston. Published by: University of Georgia Press. Nowhere in the South does a memorial stand to Lee's intimate friend and second-in-command James Longstreet. In Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant, William Garrett Piston examines the life of James Longstreet and explains how a man so revered during the course of the war could fall from grace so swiftly and completely. Unlike other generals in gray whose deeds are familiar to southerners and northerners alike, Longstreet has the image not of a hero but of an incompetent who lost the Battle of Gettysburg and, by extension, the war itself.

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In "Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant," Author William Garret Piston examines how the reputation of Lieutenant General James Longstreet has been unfairly besmirched by Lost Cause proponents, such as Jubal Early and William Nelson Pendleton, following the death of their beloved commander, General Robert E. Lee, in 1870. With an eye towards convincing the public and future generations that the Southern war effort was not in vain, Lost Cause proponents found it necessary to deify Lee, while casting Longstreet in role of the scapegoat for the South's defeat at Gettysburg and consequently the war itself. Piston attempts to do what he can to set the record straight about Longstreet. He shows that Longstreet and Lee mutually respected each other and had a close relationship during the war. Lee relied upon Longstreet for his military advice and enjoyed keeping company with him. Part of the Brown Thrasher Books Series). by James Longstreet and William Garrett Piston. Best Book on Longstreet: Lee's Dependable Field Commander. com User, February 5, 2002. This is a very objective and informative book on General Longstreet who, had he died at the battle of the Wilderness instead of surviving his very severe wounds, may have had a monument on Monument Ave. in Richmond in spite of not being a Virginian.

William Garrett Piston. Reconstructing the military career of one of the Confederacy's most competent but also one of its most vilified corps commanders, this book reveals how Longstreet became, in the years after Appomattox, the Judas of the Lost Cause, the. Download Free Books Downloader.

William Garrett Piston, professor of history at Southwest Missouri State University, is author of Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant: James Longstreet and His Place in Southern History. Richard W. Hatcher III is historian at Fort Sumter National Monument. Библиографические данные. Wilson's Creek: The Second Battle of the Civil War and the Men Who Fought It Civil War America Series. William Garrett Piston, Richard W. Hatcher, III. Издание

Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant explains how this reputation developed-how James Longstreet became, in the years after Appomattox, the scapegoat for the South's defeat, a Judas for the new religion of the Lost Cause. Download Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant: James Longstreet and his place in Southern History PDF Download Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant: James Longstreet and his place in Southern History ERUB Download Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant: James Longstreet and his place in Southern History DOC Download Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant: James Longstreet and his place in Southern.

In the South, one can find any number of bronze monuments to the Confederacy featuring heroic images of Robert E. Lee, Stonewall Jackson, J. E. B. Stuart, and many lesser commanders. But while the tarnish on such statues has done nothing to color the reputation of those great leaders, there remains one Confederate commander whose tarnished image has nothing to do with bronze monuments. Nowhere in the South does a memorial stand to Lee's intimate friend and second-in-command James Longstreet.

In Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant, William Garrett Piston examines the life of James Longstreet and explains how a man so revered during the course of the war could fall from grace so swiftly and completely. Unlike other generals in gray whose deeds are familiar to southerners and northerners alike, Longstreet has the image not of a hero but of an incompetent who lost the Battle of Gettysburg and, by extension, the war itself. Piston's reappraisal of the general's military record establishes Longstreet as an energetic corps commander with an unsurpassed ability to direct troops in combat, as a trustworthy subordinate willing to place the war effort above personal ambition. He made mistakes, but Piston shows that he did not commit the grave errors at Gettysburg and elsewhere of which he was so often accused after the war.

In discussing Longstreet's postwar fate, Piston analyzes the literature and public events of the time to show how the southern people, in reaction to defeat, evolved an image of themselves which bore little resemblance to reality. As a product of the Georgia backwoods, Longstreet failed to meet the popular cavalier image embodied by Lee, Stuart, and other Confederate heroes. When he joined the Republican party during Reconstruction, Longstreet forfeited his wartime reputation and quickly became a convenient target for those anxious to explain how a "superior people" could have lost the war. His new role as the villain of the Lost Cause was solidified by his own postwar writings. Embittered by years of social ostracism resulting from his Republican affiliation, resentful of the orchestrated deification of Lee and Stonewall Jackson, Longstreet exaggerated his own accomplishments and displayed a vanity that further alienated an already offended southern populace.

Beneath the layers of invective and vilification remains a general whose military record has been badly maligned. Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant explains how this reputation developed--how James Longstreet became, in the years after Appomattox, the scapegoat for the South's defeat, a Judas for the new religion of the Lost Cause.

Reviews: 7
Ynneig
In "Lee's Tarnished Lieutenant," Author William Garret Piston examines how the reputation of Lieutenant General James Longstreet has been unfairly besmirched by Lost Cause proponents, such as Jubal Early and William Nelson Pendleton, following the death of their beloved commander, General Robert E. Lee, in 1870. Facts were distorted and the truth obscured in an effort by Lost Cause proponents to create an historical record for future generations that would justify the vast bloodshed, sacrifice and deaths of all the brave Southern soldiers who fought and lost the War Between the States. A further motivation on the part of Early and Pendleton was to distract attention from their own wartime failures at Gettysburg. With an eye towards convincing the public and future generations that the Southern war effort was not in vain, Lost Cause proponents found it necessary to deify Lee, while casting Longstreet in role of the scapegoat for the South's defeat at Gettysburg and consequently the war itself.

Piston attempts to do what he can to set the record straight about Longstreet. He shows that Longstreet and Lee mutually respected each other and had a close relationship during the war. Lee relied upon Longstreet for his military advice and enjoyed keeping company with him. Although Longstreet considered it his duty as second in command to give Lee advice even if it ran counter to what Lee believed to be the best course of action, for example, employing the strategic offense but the tactical defensive at Gettysburg, Longstreet would always defer to Lee in the end as a trusted and loyal subordinate, never hesitant to obey his commander's orders on the battlefield.

For Piston, Longstreet became an easy target for Lost Cause proponents to blame for the South's loss of the war, because he became a Republican in postbellum years, which represented the political party of Lincoln and the North. Longstreet's attempt to refute the Lost Causers on the printed page did not help much, because he came off as being jealous and concerned with his own self-advancement. In this sense, Piston felt Longstreet proved to be his own worst enemy.

Although some revisionist historians, such as Glenn Tucker and Donald Bridgmen Sanger, have attempted to set the record straight, there are other historians who have extolled the virtues of Lee at the expense of Longstreet. Was Longstreet a misunderstood and unappreciated hero of the Southern war effort, or was he the cause of the South's defeat at Gettysburg and the Civil War as a whole? Piston makes a convincing case for the former.
Oppebro
This is a more important book than it seems because it describes how Longstreet, an talented and loyal Confederate General, responded to the defeat, especially when many were blaming it unfairly on him. Longstreet's if-you-can't-beat-them-then-join-them strategy triggered a very hostile reaction from those who advocated if-you-can't-beat-them-then-keep-on-fighting-anyway. Longstreet should have anticipated that and taken precautions (good commanders do that), but he apparently neither expected it nor responded constructively, and that was his greatest post-war blunder.
National defeat is not something the USA has needed to deal with (except for the former Confederate States). Vietnam may be the closest analogue, and our excessively emotional and clumsy responses there confirms my point: we do not know how to lose gracefully and we need to learn before our poor reactions to a defeat cause more damage than the defeat itself.
Longstreet is a good example of how not to do it. He should have tried to set the record straight without the appearance of waging a personal vendetta (not easy here), and we are indebted to Prof. Piston for clearly showing that to us.
James T. Davis.
Wrathmaster
A good brief history of not only Longstreet, but the intellectual dishonesty of the Lost Cause. This book does a nice job of being balanced in terms of Longstreet's strengths and weaknesses and shows rather than just tells how the lies of the Lost Cause affected Longstreet and the view of the slave-based South for over a century after the war.
Vobei
If you want to know more about the man, this is fairly definitive. I've been following him for years and Piston pumps on verifying his data. Well done.
Faugami
This is an excelllent book on James "Old Pete" Longstreet, Lee's right hand man and "Old War Horse". It is so good to see a scholarly work that gives General Longstreet the credit he deserves as one of the finest general of the Confederacy and certainly a more important general than the overated Stonewall Jackson. The author does an excellent job of reviewing Longstreet's war record and showing how his political enemies and the adherants to the "lost cause" rewrote history, falsely changing Longstreet from a hero to a scapegoat in one of the most unfair misrepresentations in history. This book along with Michael Saharra's "Killer Angel's" and 1993's film "Gettysburg" goes a great way in repairing this great man's standing in history.
Scream_I LOVE YOU
I ordered this for my son, a college student who needed it for one of his classes. He gives it 5 stars.
Onath
one of the souths wonderful leaders, too bad Lee didn't understand or take his advice more often
Awesome book about a very interesting historical figure.