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Download Into the Tunnel: The Brief Life of Marion Samuel, 1931-1943 epub book
ISBN:0805079270
Author: Ann Millin,Götz Aly
ISBN13: 978-0805079272
Title: Into the Tunnel: The Brief Life of Marion Samuel, 1931-1943
Format: txt mbr mobi lrf
ePUB size: 1272 kb
FB2 size: 1158 kb
DJVU size: 1293 kb
Language: English
Category: Historical
Publisher: Metropolitan Books; Reprint edition (January 8, 2008)
Pages: 144

Into the Tunnel: The Brief Life of Marion Samuel, 1931-1943 by Ann Millin,Götz Aly



Personal Name: Samuel, Marion, 1931-1943. Author: Claudius,, Emperor of Rome, 10 . Author: Sullivan, J. P. (John Patrick) Author: Seneca, Lucius Annaeus, ca. 4 .

Sixty years after her death, when Götz Aly received the award, he was moved to find out whatever he could about Marion’s short life and restore this child to history.

Into the Tunnel book. Sixty years after her death, when Götz Aly received the award, he was moved to find out whatever he could about Marion's short life and restore this child to history.

Into the Tunnel pieces fragments of an ordinary life into an extraordinary fabric of remembrance. By restoring one girl's history, Götz Aly helps us bear witness to the unique fate of one innocent consumed by the Holocaust. Marion Samuel was eleven years old when she arrived at Auschwitz in March of 1943, she was gassed to death the same day and her body burned in the crematorium. He ashes were thrown into a pit with hundreds of others and then covered over with soil. Their is no marker over where she died.

Digging into historical archives, Götz Aly pieces together the life of an 11-year-old victim of the Holocaust. In 2003, the German Remembrance Foundation awarded the historian Götz Aly the Marion Samuel Prize, which commemorates the one million Jewish children murdered by the Nazis. It was named for a young victim whose name was chosen at random from the lists of the dead, a gesture meant to underscore the tragic anonymity of the Holocaust’s casualties. In accepting the tribute, Aly set out on a mission to uncover the life of Marion Samuel, to rescue her at least from obscurity. The idea was inspired, though perhaps not surprising, given Aly’s background

Götz Aly. - primary author. Millin, Ann. Translator. Im Tunnel : das kurze Leben der Marion Samuel 1931–1943. Im Tunnel: das kurze Leben der Marion Samuel 1931–1943. Original publication date.

Topics Samuel, Marion, 1931-1943, Jewish children in the Holocaust. Publisher New York : Metropolitan Books/Henry Holt : Published in association with the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Kahle/Austin Foundation. Contributor Internet Archive. Includes bibliographical references (p. -121).

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The Brief Life of Marion Samuel, 1931–1943. by Götz Aly & translated by Ann Millin. A recipient of the Marion Samuel Prize commemorates the 60th anniversary of Samuel’s death with a brief overview of her short life.

A generous feat of biographical sleuthing by an acclaimed historian rescues one child victim of the Holocaust from oblivion
Reviews: 7
Mala
One of the abiding insights that comes through in Goetz Ally's Into the Tunnel is just how efficient bureaucracies can be at transforming vibrantly alive human beings into impersonal statistics on official forms. In their extermination program, the Nazis, with an eerie fidelity to record-keeping, felt the need to document every detail of the lives they were destroying. That's why Aly is able to trace the unhappy fate of the beautiful little girl, Marion Samuel, who is the protagonist of this unhappy tale.

Such exercises are important; they help to keep memory alive. But Aly's book is more of a model of historical research than a sustained biography that captures who Marion Samuel was. This is as it must be. Nazi documentation records dates when the Samuel family loses its business, moves from one locale to another, and is rounded up for deportation to Auschwitz, but little else. There are few photographs left, and family memories on both Cilly's (Marion's mother) and Ernst's (her father) side have dimmed (or were outright obliterated by the Holocaust). So what we have in this book is a lot of data that leaves us with the sinking awareness that the 12-year old Marion simply disappeared in a wide ocean of bureaucratic files and forms even before she was murdered and incinerated at Auschwitz.

Still, we get glimpses of her, and those glimpses are all the more poignant for being so incomplete. One of her schoolmates recalls that in 1938, a full five years before her murder, an 8-year old Marion was already feeling the burden of the Nazi horror. She remembers (p. 82) that at one point a near-hysterical Marion blurted out her fear that Jews were disappearing into an ominous tunnel. We also know that at the final roundup, Marion was separated for three full days from her parents, and sent to a detention warehouse full of equally parentless children. Marion's mother, Cilly, was sent on to Auschwitz and quite likely was immediately murdered. Marion and her father Ernst were reunited in the same transport that took them both to Auschwitz. One can only imagine the forlornness Marion experienced before she was reunited with her father for their final journey into the tunnel. Both were murdered a week later.

It's good that Aly's work allows us to know something of a child, unspeakably murdered before she barely had a chance to live, who otherwise would've totally disappeared.
Hǻrley Quinn
Gotz Aly set out to discover who Marion Samuel was after being named the recipient of the "Marion Samuel Prize." Using the best of his historical detection skills he was able to piece together her short, tragic life that ended at the hands of the Nazis. This book is concise, informative, and heartbreaking.
Wat!?
More than other books, the main interest of this one is how and why it was written. The Remembrance Foundation randomly selected Marion Samuel as a memorial icon, sort of an “unknown soldier.” Upon being awarded a literary prize named in her honor, author Gõtz Aly decided to research the girl's past to to tell her story in place of anonymity.
It's a fairly familiar saga of a business family thriving in Germany before 1933, then splitting up, with some getting to the US, some to Singapore, and some who stayed until deportation and death. Aly has done a tenacious job of difficult research in giving the girl a face and small personality as a memorial to her and other victims. He uses verbal testimony and old photos to reconstruct the girl's family history before their murder at Auschwitz in 1943. Using German records, he balances the poignancy of their story with an accounting, to the pfennig, of the small financial benefit that the Reich obtained by their deportation and murder.
The book is well reviewed in preface, introduction and afterword. They don't say whether the Remembrance Foundation needs to make another selection as a universal icon to represent the rest of those who went “into the tunnel.”
Mananara
Marion Samuel was eleven years old when she arrived at Auschwitz in March of 1943, she was gassed to death the same day and her body burned in the crematorium. He ashes were thrown into a pit with hundreds of others and then covered over with soil. Their is no marker over where she died.

But who was this child and what was her crime that she should be treated so. She came from a lower middle class family from West Pomerania, near the Baltic Sea where the German-Polish border is today. At the age of six she was a witness to Kristallnacht and forbidden to go to the German Public School she had attended for the last three years. He family lost their business and both her parent's became "unskilled" factory workers. Marion was able to go to a "Jewish" school for two more years, before those were shut down. For the last years of her life she lived in a one room ground floor apartment off an alley. Since her parent's were away each day, she had to fill her time as best she could.

How did she view the world she lived in? Did she wonder why she and her parents were being treated the way they were? Did she have any understanding that she was being punished for a random act of birth? At least we know she was on the same train as her father (who lasted sixty one days in the camp) when she was "evacuated". Thankfully, the horrors at the end for this little girl were tempered by the comfort of a parent.

Hopefully, the people that ordered her death, and carried it out, suffered for what they did.
Oso
"Into the Tunnel" by Gotz Aly is the story of a girl's life--one of the murdered millions of Jews under the Nazi regime. Mr. Aly does his best to recreate the life of a little girl by using the records he could find on her life, and filling in gaps with historical information. It is heartbreaking to read the far too short tale of this little girl's life, but what a brilliant idea to pull her from obscurity and give the world this story. It would be wonderful to be able to be able to do this for all the victims of genocide.