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ISBN:0192812335
Author: Tomas O'Crohan,Robin Flower
ISBN13: 978-0192812339
Title: The Islandman (Oxford Paperbacks)
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ePUB size: 1182 kb
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Language: English
Category: Historical
Publisher: Oxford University Press; reissue edition (March 23, 1978)
Pages: 262

The Islandman (Oxford Paperbacks) by Tomas O'Crohan,Robin Flower



by Tomás O'Crohan (Author), Robin Flower (Translator). ISBN-13: 978-0192812339. It was originally written in Irish Gaelic and is translated by Robin Flower.

Tomas O'Crohan was born on the Great Blasket Island in 1865 and died there in 1937, a great master of his native Irish. His book is a valuable description of a new vanished way of life; his sole purpose in writing it was in his own words, 'to set down the character of the people about me so that some record of us might live after us, for the like of us will never be again'. As Robin Flower says in the introduction, the great value of this book is that is a description of this vanishing mode of life by one who has known no other, and tells his story with perfect.

Die Westliche Insel Robin Flower, Jörn Wilhelm (Ed. Books on Demand - BoD, 2018. com/author/Robin Flower. htm last update: 1/5/2019.

The Islandman by Tomas O'Crohan 9780192812339 (Paperback, 1977) Delivery UK delivery is within 3 to 5 working days. Read full description. item 1 The Islandman by Tomas O'Crohan 9780192812339 (Paperback, 1977) -The Islandman by Tomas O'Crohan 9780192812339 (Paperback, 1977). item 2 The Islandman (Oxford Paperbacks Series), O'Crohan, Tomás, Very Good Book -The Islandman (Oxford Paperbacks Series), O'Crohan, Tomás, Very Good Book.

Tomás Ó Criomhthain (pronounced ) (anglicised as Tomas O'Crohan or Thomas O'Crohan; 21 December 1856–1937) was a native of the Irish-speaking Great Blasket Island 3 kilometres (. mi) off the coast of the Dingle Peninsula in Ireland. He wrote two books, Allagar na h-Inise (Island Cross-Talk) written over the period 1918–23 and published in 1928, and An t-Oileánach (The Islandman), completed in 1923 and published in 1929. Both have been translated into English. The Islandman, translated by Robin Flower; Oxford, Clarendon Press, 1951; ISBN 0-19-815202-7. His book is a valuable description of a now vanished way of life; his sole purpose in writ Tomas O'Crohan was born on the Great Blasket Island in 1865 and died there in 1937, a great master of his native Irish

Tomas O'Crohan, Robin Flower (Translator). The Islander: The Autobiography of Tomas O'Crohan (Hardcover). Published September 14th 2012 by Gill & Company. Hardcover, 314 pages. The Islandman (Oxford Paperbacks). Author(s): Tomas O'Crohan, Robin Flower (Translator). Tomás Ó Criomhthain.

Author: Tomas O'Crohan, Robin Flower. Other Format: PDF EPUB MOBI TXT CHM WORD PPT. Book Info: Sorry! Have not added any WORD format description on The Islandman (Oxford Paperbacks)! download this book right now! 19940. Users also downloaded these books!!! Charlotte Temple (Oxford Paperbacks). The Peoples of Philadelphia: A History of Ethnic Groups and Lower-Class Life, 1790-1940 (Pennsylvania Paperbacks).

Download free "The islandman" by Tomás Ó Crohan EPUB, MOBI, PDF, TXT, Kindle. Identifiers: ISBN 10: 0192812335. Belonged to: "Oxford paperbacks" serie. This book describes the following items: Ó Crohan, Tomás, 1856-1937 Homes And Haunts Ireland Blasket Islands.

Tomas O'Crohan was born on the Great Blasket Island in 1865 and died there in 1937, a great master of his native Irish. He shared to the full the perilous life of a primitive community, yet possessed a shrewd and humorous detachment that enabled him to observe and describe the world. His book is a valuable description of a now vanished way of life; his sole purpose in writing it was in his own words, 'to set down the character of the people about me so that some record of us might live after us, for the like of us will never be again'.The Blasket Islands are three miles off Irelands Dingle Peninsula. Until their evacuation just after the Second World War, the lives of the 150 or so Blasket Islanders had remained unchanged for centuries. A rich oral tradition of story-telling, poetry, and folktales kept alive the legends and history of the islands, and has made their literature famous throughout the world. The 7 Blasket Island books published by OUP contain memoirs and reminiscences from within this literary tradition, evoking a way of life which has now vanished.
Reviews: 7
Fountain_tenderness
Five stars because this is such a valuable and vivid record of another culture, another time, another people. The Blasket islanders were already strongly differentiated from the mainland Irish at the turn of the last century, insulated as they were by their isolation at the edge of the western world. I greatly enjoyed reading this book, and having a window on the humor, struggles, successes, sorrows and viewpoints of the islanders. I found myself at times strongly drawn to the Tomas O'Crohan's worldview, and at other times baffled and bemused. There is a cultural gulf which it takes imagination and sympathy to traverse, and I did my best. The rhythm of the Gaelic, everyone says, comes through in the translation, and I believe it. It makes the text seem all the more authentic.

Most of all, this book is real. It is not a romantic or polished recreation of the past. I am tired of the historical novel with all its distortions, and of the fake 'history' laboriously 'reproduced' in films and television series. In the worst cases, these 'recreations' are little more than modern ideas and plots with period costumes and hair arrangements plastered on top. This is the actual article, a glittering, deep and honest rendering of a way of life that now exists for the main part only on paper. Thank you, Tomas O'Crohan.
Goldendragon
This was wonderful......a glimpse into another age. Tomas' writing is simple, moving and filled with humor, sadness, tragedy and the wonderfully interesting mundane of life. Do not expect a towering epic, smoothly flowing narrative. It jumps around a bit and frustratingly leaves out bits of stories you want to know more about but in the end the overall experience is to be able to feel a life lived and a life lived in a world that has just about gone from living memory. Very highly recommended but be prepared for a small, quiet read whose depths are often in the unsaid and in the whole of Tomas' remarkable story.

Visited the Blaskets before reading this......that enhanced the experience tremendously.....but I wish I had read it before going AND after.
happy light
To really understand this book you have to set the Wayback Machine to a time before antibiotics, grief counseling, no-fault divorce, and frozen dinners. The life and times described in this book are hard. That hardness placed enormous pressure on the character of the people in the book. What I mean is back in them days sometimes things were settled with fists and you died a couple of weeks later from an infection picked up from a scrape received in the fight.

The story is about a man who lived on one of the small islands located in the far west of Ireland. He was born in a time of change and recorded the passing of a way of life that did not tolerate mistakes or fools. The odd thing about the book is it matter-of-factly describes enormous challenges and sacrifices in a manner that conveys "oh, that's just an ordinary thing in an ordinary day."

The language is archaic but still understandable.
Reighbyra
It you are into Irish life this is the real deal. This autobiography was translated from the Gaelic, but still has a lilting pace. When O"Crohan died in the 1920's a bit of the past died with him. This book has it all, the economy, the music, the ocean, the sports, the politics, the drinking, the struggle of impoverished people to lead proud self-sufficient lives. It is also funny as hell, what a story teller! This is one of my favorite biographies. It rivals All God's Dangers, and that's saying something.
Dagdardana
I had the good fortune (and more importantly, good weather) to visit Tomas O'Crohan's Great Blasket Island in July. Reading this book of a lost time and way of life reconnected me with the sights, sounds, smells, and steps I took on that memorable trip. This is a remarkable memoir written from a humble perspective that I highly recommend.
Barinirm
This is the autobiographical account of a simple fisherman, Thomas O' Crohan, who lived on Great Blasket island in the second half of the 19th century and beginning of 20th century. It was originally written in Irish Gaelic and is translated by Robin Flower. The English version is both poetic and obscure as Flower tried to translate the original language as closely as possible thus giving us an odd form of Hiberno-English which is redolent of The Playboy of the Western World (and of the way my own grand parents spoke).
Of course one is reminded strongly of Peig while reading this, and the stories are as fascinating and poignant as Peig's are. I was particularly amused by the the recounting of the group of fishermen rowing out to catch up with a burning ship (they were hoping to benefit from the cargo they might salvage). However, they were surprised to find that, although the ship was very obviously on fire, it continued in a straight and determined path; other fishing boats joind in the trail following this peculiar ship. The author then reveals that it was their first time to encounter a steamship.
Abuseyourdna
Intriguing of a man raised on one of the Blasket Islands near Dingle bay, Ireland where life was harsh with a constant struggle for survival. Approximately 200 people lived on the island around 1900, but by 1953 no one has lived there. The purpose of this book was to record their way of life so it could be preserved in print form.
We went to Ireland. Felt a need to buy this book. Glad we did. It was a wonderful book about the lives of the Irish and all they did years back. We also bought the companion book. Both excellent. We got a deeper understanding of the amazing people the Irish were - and still are.