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ISBN:067411390X
Author: Howard B. Schaffer
ISBN13: 978-0674113909
Title: Chester Bowles: New Dealer in Cold War (Institute for the Study of Diplomacy)
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Language: English
Category: Historical
Publisher: Harvard University Press (October 1, 1993)
Pages: 387

Chester Bowles: New Dealer in Cold War (Institute for the Study of Diplomacy) by Howard B. Schaffer



Retired diplomat Schaffer has written the first biography of his late colleague Bowles, governor of Connecticut, twice ambassador to India (appointed by Truman and Kennedy), and JFK's undersecretary of state. Bowles's legacy was his belief in the centrality of the Third World to . interests, his commitment to Third World rural development, and an abiding liberal idealism. Series: Institute for the Study of Diplomacy. Hardcover: 387 pages. Publisher: Harvard University Press (October 1, 1993).

CHESTER BOWLES New Dealer in the Cold War. Howard Β. Schaffer. An Institute for the Study of Diplomacy Book. HARVARD UNIVERSITY PRESS Cambridge, Massachusetts London, England 1993. Printed in the United States of America 10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1. This book is printed on recycled and acid-free paper, and its binding materials have been chosen for strength and durability.

Howard Schaffer, a former ambassador and seasoned Foreign Service officer, worked closely with Bowles in India and Washington and is able to offer a colorful firsthand portrayal of the man, as well as an insider's view of American foreign policy in the making. Bowles's indefatigable energy, inspired idealism, and humanitarian instincts leave their mark on these pages - as do his stubbornness, his cultural blinders, and his failure to master the game of bureaucratic politics.

When Harry Truman named him ambassador to India in 1951, Chester Bowles was already a prominent figure in American public life - a onetime advertising mogul, wartime administrator, governor of Connecticut - and yet his past hardly presaged the turn his path would take in Asia.

Chester Bowles: New Dealer in Cold War. Ellsworth Bunker: Global Troubleshooter, Vietnam Hawk. The Limits of Influence: American Role in Kashmir. William Allison, of Bowling Green State University, describes Schaffer's book as "admirable" and further states that Schaffer deserves praise for his biography while Bowles needs examination. Ellsworth Bunker: Global Troubleshooter. How Pakistan negotiates with the United States: Riding the Roller Coaster. Besides books, Schaffer has also authored several articles on matters related to South Asia. The Limts of Influence: America's Role in Kashmir. Michael Cotter terms Schaffer's book as outstanding and says it is a must read for those studying the Kashmir Conflict as well as the current Central Asian conflicts. Chester Bowles: New Dealer in the Cold War. According to John M. Carroll, of Lamar University, Schaffer has written a "splendid diplomatic biography" of Chester Bowles. Carroll notes that Schaffer assesses Bowler's diplomatic ideas by "carefully examining" his role as American ambassador to India and as Kennedy's undersecretary of state.

new dealer in the Cold War. by Howard B. Published 1993 by Harvard University Press in Cambridge, Mass. Ambassadors, Biography, Foreign relations, Protected DAISY, In library. Chester Bowles (1901-). India, United States. Includes bibliographical references (p. 333-336) and index.

Schaffer, Howard . Chester Bowles: New Dealer in the Cold War, Cambridge, Mass. Harvard University Press, 1993, p. 13. ^ UMass Amherst Fall 2010 Schedule of Classes Archived June 29, 2011, at the Wayback Machine. "Born Poor? Santa Fe economist Samuel Bowles says you better get used to it". ^ Samuel Bowles (June 20, 2008).

According to Schaffer, writing his first book, Chester Bowles: New Dealer in the Cold War, "whetted his interest" in writing biography, and Ellsworth Bunker was the ideal subject for his next biography on another "practitioner of foreign policy. The fact that Bunker's diplomatic career did not even begin until he was fifty-six, after retiring as a leader in the American sugar industry, adds to the remarkable story of his 90 years. Schaffer's life of Bunker continues chronologically with his formative years at Yale, the sugar industry in Washington, to his work on the Panama Canal Treaty, and ends with Henry Kissinger's Middle East negotiations in 1973. All the while Schaffer reiterates the man was more than just the Vietnam "hawk" so many Americans took him for and details the contributions that Bunker made to US foreign relations during the Cold War.

When Harry Truman named him ambassador to India in 1951, Chester Bowles was already a prominent figure in American public life - a onetime advertising mogul, wartime administrator, governor of Connecticut - and yet his past hardly presaged the turn his path would take in Asia. Over the next two decades, at home and abroad, Bowles would become one of the leading liberal lights in American foreign policy, a New Dealer often at odds with the stiffening cold war conservatism of his time, His biography is also the story of America finding its place in a changing world, a story of remarkable relevance to our own post-cold war era.Howard Schaffer, a former ambassador and seasoned Foreign Service officer, worked closely with Bowles in India and Washington and is able to offer a colorful firsthand portrayal of the man, as well as an insider's view of American foreign policy in the making. Bowles's indefatigable energy, inspired idealism, and humanitarian instincts leave their mark on these pages - as do his stubbornness, his cultural blinders, and his failure to master the game of bureaucratic politics. We see him in his sometimes exhilarating and ultimately frustrating struggle to influence the leaders and policy makers of his day - as twice ambassador to India, Democratic party foreign policy spokesman, congressman from Connecticut, foreign policy adviser to John F. Kennedy, under secretary to Dean Rusk at the State Department, and President Kennedy's special adviser on Africa, Asia, and Latin America.Drawing on a wealth of documents and interviews with some of the nation's top foreign policy makers in the post-World War II years, Schaffer shows us Bowles in his tireless attempt to advance an alternative approach to international relations during those decades, one defined less in military than in economic terms, focused less on the struggle for power with the Soviet Union in Europe than on the contest with China over the fate of Third World countries. "Only the historians can determine who was right and who was wrong," Dean Rusk once said of Bowles's ideas and convictions - and today history itself is writing the last word.