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ISBN:1852855118
Author: Pamela Pilbeam
ISBN13: 978-1852855116
Title: Madame Tussaud: and the History of Waxworks
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ePUB size: 1805 kb
FB2 size: 1379 kb
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Language: English
Category: Historical
Publisher: Bloomsbury Academic; First Edition edition (August 10, 2006)
Pages: 288

Madame Tussaud: and the History of Waxworks by Pamela Pilbeam



According to Pamela Pilbeam, there may be a simple reason for the enduring popularity of Madame Tussaud's: "There is nothing so fascinating for a human being as others of the species. Pilbeam's study is in part a biography of the woman behind the institution, in part a cultural history of wax figures. Both demand serious attention  . This indicates one significant line of inquiry in the book – the way that wax exhibitions presented news as entertainment. That continues today: Pilbeam notes that three New York firemen were being moulded in April 2002.

Topics Tussaud, Marie, 1761-1850, Madame Tussaud's - History, Waxworks - Great Britain - History. Publisher Hambledon and London. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on October 1, 2012.

The success of Madame Tussaud's, from its beginnings in Paris before. Pamela Pilbeam sees Madame Tussaud herself and her exhibition as part of the wider history of wax modelling and of popular entertainment.

Pamela Pilbeam sees Madame Tussaud herself and her exhibition as part of the wider history of wax modelling and of popular entertainment.

This work looks at Madame Tussaud herself and her exhibition as part of the wider history of wax modelling and of popular entertainment. Advertisement for Madame Tussauds Exhibition at the Reindeer Inn Hull February 1812. 70. Waterloo Place Edinburgh engraving by Thomas Shepherd. 74. The Bristol Riots of 1831. 76. Advertisement for Madame Tussauds following the death of the Duke of Wellington 1852. 117. Punchs description of the Chamber of Horrors 1849.

Madame Tussaud and the History of Waxworks. New York: Hambledon and London. Out of ideas for the holidays? Visit our Gift Guides and find our recommendations on what to get friends and family during the holiday season.

Madame Tussaud and her Waxworks. Pamela Pilbeam celebrates the bicentenary of the arrival of Madame Tussaud's waxworks in Britain. Pamela Pilbeam Published in History Today Volume 52 Issue 12 December 2002. Marie Tussaud (née Grosholz; 1761-1850) served her apprenticeship as a wax sculptor in Paris with her ‘uncle’ Philippe Curtius. On the eve of the Revolution of 1789 Curtius was running wax exhibitions in the two most fashionable entertainment centres in Paris, the wax salon in the Palais Royal, and the ‘cave of the great thieves’ in the more down-market, but equally trendy, Boulevard du Temple.

Madame Tussaud: And the History of Waxworks. Madame Tussaud was written by and Pamela Pilbeam. The 288 page book was published by A&C Black in 2006 (originally in 2003) with an ISBN 10 of 1852855118. Most books are now availible in ebook, pdf and audible formats. Madame Tussaud mentions 1 serial killers including Donald Neilson. This work looks at Madame Tussaud herself and her exhibition as part of the wider history of wax modelling and of popular entertainment. 1 Books Books By Pamela Pilbeam. 1 Total Serial Killers Mentioned.

The success of Madame Tussaud’s, from its beginnings in Paris before the French Revolution to its prolonged fame as a popular tourist attraction in London, bears out the fascination of waxworks. Pamela Pilbeam sees Madame Tussaud herself and her exhibition as part of the wider history of wax modeling and of popular entertainment. Tussaud’s catered for the public’s fascination with monarchy, whether Henry VIII and his wives or Queen Victoria, as well as for their love of history, acting as an accessible and enjoyable museum, but also providing the perennial fascination of the Chamber of Horrors.Pamela Pilbeam sees Madame Tussaud herself and her exhibition as part of the wider history of wax modelling and of popular entertainment. Tussaud's catered for the public's fascination with monarchy, whether Henry VIII and his wives or Queen Victoria, as well as for their love of history, acting as an accessible and enjoyable museum (but also providing the perennial fascination of the Chamber of Horrors).
Reviews: 4
Onaxan
Very interesting, talented woman.
Impala Frozen
Wonderful historical read.
Dddasuk
Note: I made some Mormon angry because of my negative reviews of books out to prove the Book of Mormon, and that person has been slamming my reviews.

Your "helpful" vote is greatly appreciated. Thanks

Pilbeam's book is worth the read for the following poem by William Wordsworth, who so accurately described the world of the macabre that includes waxworks. Here is a country fair:

The Horse of knowledge and the Learned Pig,
The Stone-eater, the man that swallows fire,
Giants, Ventriloquists, the Invisible Girl,
The Bust that speaks and moves its gooling eyes,
The Wax-work, Clock-work, all the marvellous craft
Of modern Merlins, Wild Beasts, Puppet shows
All out-o'-the way, far-fetched, perverted things.

It is surprising that a number of the practicianer's of wax art were women. Mrs. Patience Wright (1725-86), a wax expert, toured America until her show was destroyed by fire. Then she moved to England, and finally to France. In 1781 "she failed to persuade Benjamin Franklin to help her set up a wax exhibition. He apparently told her there was too much competition."

Highly recommended history of a strange art form.
Ximinon
With all the historic sites, shrines, monuments, cathedrals, and museums in London, one must-see has been a tourist magnet for almost two centuries, and has been merely a commercial operation. Pamela Pilbeam says, "There is nothing so fascinating for a human being as others of the species," and if we can't rub elbows with the stars (and scoundrels) of our species themselves, then waxwork simulations will do. Pilbeam has written an enjoyable history, _Madame Tussaud and the History of Waxworks_ (Hambledon & London), which gives insight to a subject that, quite obviously, people find fascinating.
The future Madame Tussaud was the niece, possibly daughter, of the man who made waxworks a popular exhibit in Paris. Once the Revolution came, both the theater and waxworks were a sort of newspaper, but waxworks, unlike newspapers and theater, were not censored. The exhibit showed who was in, who was out, and who was guillotined. There was a great appetite to put the guillotined heads on display, and, according to her sometimes unreliable memoirs, Madame Tussaud at her studio would receive the heads hot off the chopper. She would make wax copies, so that there would be enough heads to go around, some going for display in England. Her eventual marriage to Monsieur Tussaud became unsatisfactory, and to pursue a career in exhibitions, she left him for England in 1802, never to return. Remarkably, she was 41 at the time, when women did not launch themselves into mid-life careers; she was to continue running her show until her death at 89. She originally had a traveling exhibit, offering music, good lighting, and space in which visitors could walk around and see themselves, as well as the waxworks. Her marketing was well-targeted; her show became a central place for people to socialize. Eventually she settled in London. There were plenty of others waxworks, but Madame Tussaud continued to be the one to see. She installed over five hundred figures in the new space, more than any competition could muster. She kept the exhibits timely and watched what people watched; a mannequin which didn't make people pause and look was doomed to be melted down. Most importantly, when museums had limited entry, she bought up relics, royal robes, and paintings that would make her waxworks respectable to the respectable middle class. But "respectable" has its limits; the most popular attraction has always been the Chamber of Horrors.
At last counting, Madame Tussaud's had more visitors than any pay-for-view attraction in England. Pilbeam examines the appeal, but it is hard to say exactly why a three dimensional image of, say, Madonna, would be a draw, when there are plenty of lively photos and movies that provide perfectly good depictions. There are some artistic claims among those who appreciate the exhibits; there is no reason, of course, why a wax sculpture should be less "art" than a bronze. Somehow, waxworks might be entertaining, might be instructive, but fundamentally are just fun. The same can be said of Pilbeam's book.