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ISBN:1903464366
Author: Donall MacAmhlaigh
ISBN13: 978-1903464366
Title: An Irish Navvy: The Diary of an Exile
Format: lit doc rtf azw
ePUB size: 1630 kb
FB2 size: 1640 kb
DJVU size: 1212 kb
Language: English
Category: Ethnic and National
Publisher: Collins Pr (August 4, 2003)
Pages: 190

An Irish Navvy: The Diary of an Exile by Donall MacAmhlaigh



Donall MacAmhlaigh kept a diary as he worked the sites, danced in the Irish halls, drank in Irish pubs and lived the life of the roving Irish navvy. Work was hard, dirty and dangerous, followed by pints in the Admiral Rodney, the Shamrock, the Cattle Market Tavern and others. Living conditions were basic at best. This vivid picture of an Irish navvy's life in England in the 1950s mirrors that of an entire generation who left Ireland without education or hope.

Donall MacAmhlaigh kept a diary as he worked the sites, danced in the Irish halls, drank in Irish pubs and lived the life of the roving Irish navvy. Living condition DIrish construction workers in post-war Britain are celebrated in song and story. Donall MacAmhlaigh kept a diary as he worked the sites, danced in the Irish halls, drank in Irish pubs and lived the life of the roving Irish navvy. Days without food or work, the hardships of work camps, lonesome partings after trips home, periods of intense isolation and bitter reflection were all part of the experience.

Details (if other): Cancel. Thanks for telling us about the problem. An Irish Navvy: The Diary of an Exile. by. Dónall Mac Amhlaigh

This book is a vivid picture of an Irish navvy's life in the England of the 1950s. Workless days, the hardships of work camps, lonesome partings after trips home, periods of intense isolation and occasional bitterness were all part of the picture. Originally published in Irish to wide acclaim, this translation was first published in 1964. ISBN13:9781903464366. Release Date:August 2003.

Originally published in 1964, this is Donall MacAmhlaigh's own story as a navvy or unskilled workman in post World War II England. Here is backbreaking, blister-making work, followed by pints of the black stuff in the Admiral Rodney and many other pubs.

This book is an extraordinarily vivid picture of an Irish navvy’s life in the England of the 1950s. This book is a must for anybody who can relate to, possibly re-live experiences, "building up and tearing England down.

Donall MacAmhlaigh from Galway moved with his family to Kilkenny when aged fourteen. Later he returned, joined the army and left in 1951 after three years at Renmore Army Barracks, Galway, and emigrated to England. I bought this book because my father was an irish migrant to the UK in the 1950s and it was an opportunity to reminisce. THis would be a good read for family historians as well. I could identify with the books content due to my own family history. IT is an easy read and can be knocked back in a very short time. One person found this helpful.

Dónall Peadar Mac Amhlaigh (10 December 1926 – 27 January 1989) was an Irish writer active during the 20th century. His first book, Dialann Deoraí, is his most widely known and has been translated into English under the title "An Irish Navvy: The Diary of an Exile".

Gives a vivid picture of an Irish navvy's life in England in the 1950's, mirroring the story of many who left Ireland without education or hope. Originally published in 1964, this is Donall MacAmhlaigh's own story as a navvy or unskilled workman in post World War II England. Here is backbreaking, blister-making work, followed by pints of the black stuff in the Admiral Rodney and many other pubs

Originally published in 1964, this is Donall MacAmhlaigh's own story as a navvy or unskilled workman in post World War II England.

Originally published in 1964, this is Donall MacAmhlaigh's own story as a navvy or unskilled workman in post World War II England. Here is backbreaking, blister-making work, followed by pints of the black stuff in the Admiral Rodney and many other pubs. Workless and foodless days, the hardships of work camps, lonesome partings after trips home, periods of intense isolation and occasional bitterness-this is an honest account of how the average Irish laborer worked and lived in and contributed to the country of the ancient enemy.
Reviews: 3
Windforge
GREAT
Ubranzac
I bought this book because my father was an irish migrant to the UK in the 1950s and it was an opportunity to reminisce. THis would be a good read for family historians as well. I could identify with the books content due to my own family history. IT is an easy read and can be knocked back in a very short time.
Oparae
The book was a first hand account about working in England in the 1950s. How hard the work was and what the small pleasures meant. Missing home and how it felt to return home for a holiday. An interesting journal.