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ISBN:0743249631
Author: Bernard Cooper
ISBN13: 978-0743249638
Title: The Bill from My Father: A Memoir
Format: doc lit lrf mbr
ePUB size: 1110 kb
FB2 size: 1616 kb
DJVU size: 1927 kb
Language: English
Category: Arts and Literature
Publisher: Simon & Schuster (January 9, 2007)
Pages: 256

The Bill from My Father: A Memoir by Bernard Cooper



The book's narrative skeleton chronicles over 15 years of the author's father descending into dementia and ultimately death. Cooper fleshes out this difficult relationship with his father, including I'm writing a memoir about a complicated father. His son tries to make sense of the man and of his own fee The title, The Bill from My Father, serves as a reminder throughout the book that there is a reason Cooper keeps his father at arm’s length most of the time–sometimes even farther, such as when he let a period of several years ago by without communication.

About book: Edward Cooper is a hard man to know. Dour and exuberant by turns, his moods dictate the always uncertain climate of the Cooper household. Balding, octogenarian, and partial to a polyester jumpsuit, Edward Cooper makes an unlikely literary muse. But to his son he looms larger than life, an overwhelming and baffling presence. Edward's ambivalent regard for his son is the springboard from which this deeply intelligent memoir takes flight

Bernard Cooper's new memoir is searing, soulful, and filled with uncommon psychological nuance and laugh-out-loud humor. If you want to see what memoir at its best is capable of, read The Bill from My Father. In it, Cooper captures the universal mysteriousness of having parents: how could these people be both so like us, and so completely foreign to us? How could they seem like both the only parents we could possibly have, and as arbitrary as if the stork dropped us by accident on their doorstep?

The Bill from My Father. Your purchase helps support NPR programming. Independent Booksellers. The award-winning author of the memoir collections Maps to Anywhere and Truth Serum explores the themes of family, memory, and identity in his life, which he describes through his relationship with his enigmatic and eccentric father. 25,000 first printing. Read an excerpt of this book. Without missing a beat, my father drew himself upright, gulped the necessary air, and spit out the words with a force that caused his face to redden like a fanned coal. He pounded his fist in his open palm. He was good at ultimatums.

Cooper is a memoirist in the Tobias Wolff vein, and is a rueful, self-effacing, yet dazzlingly precise affair. Michael Upchurch, The Seattle Times. one of the loveliest memoirs to come along in a great while. Kevin Smokler, San Francisco Chronicle. Alice Sebold, author of The Lovely Bones. Resources and Downloads. High Resolution Images. Book Cover Image (jpg): The Bill from My Father. Trade Paperback 9780743249638. Author Photo (jpg): Bernard Cooper

Bernard Cooper's memoir is a 'stop everything in your life' reading experience. Bill from My Father flows with what I've come to think of as the standard "Cooperian" fluid, lucid prose. Mr. Cooper has an amazing ability to explore complicated interpersonal ties without ever losing me as a reader to sentimentality or gratuitously personal complications. In this he reminds me a lot of George Eliot.

And then the final shot to the solar-plexus, the epitaph his father had selected: You finally got me. A graceful memoir filled with pain, regret, confusion and wonder. Pub Date: Feb. 7th, 2006.

Edward Cooper is a hard man to know.Dour and exuberant by turns, his moods dictate the always uncertain climate of the Cooper household. Balding, octogenarian, and partial to a polyester jumpsuit, Edward Cooper makes an unlikely literary muse. But to his son he looms larger than life, an overwhelming and baffling presence. Edward's ambivalent regard for his son is the springboard from which this deeply intelligent memoir takes flight. By the time the author receives his inheritance (which includes a message his father taped to the underside of a safe deposit box), and sees the surprising epitaph inscribed on his father's headstone, The Bill from My Father has become a penetrating meditation on both monetary and emotional indebtedness, and on the mysterious nature of memory and love.
Reviews: 7
Granijurus
This was a thoroughly entertaining and brilliantly written memoir. Being an information junkie, I seldom read purely for entertainment, and I almost never read memoirs, even when they are written by someone famous. However, I was instantly attracted to the poetic quality of Cooper's prose when I heard a chapter read aloud on an NPR program. I just had to get another dose of Cooper's amazing gift for our language.

The book is both funny and poignant, and offers some subtle yet profound insights about the wellspring of feelings that shape our all-too-human characters. The revealing story about the author's relationship with his father also provoked me to take a deeper look into myself. I'd give it six stars if I could.
MARK BEN FORD
Bernard Cooper's memoir is a 'stop everything in your life' reading experience. I bought a copy for my nephew and will continue to buy copies for all the readers in my life! Don't let this one pass you by! I heard about it through David Sedaris at one of his readings and he says it best when he says, 'don't buy my books. Buy Cooper's book.' And I did and am so thankful! Am now reading his essays. Thank you, Bernard Cooper, for your brilliance, your pathos, your humor and your candor and love!
Laitchai
There are 2 writers whose next books I wait for, buy and gobble up right away, then re-read slower a few more times: One is David Foster Wallace and the other is Bernard Cooper.

_Bill from My Father_ flows with what I've come to think of as the standard "Cooperian" fluid, lucid prose. Mr. Cooper has an amazing ability to explore complicated interpersonal ties without ever losing me as a reader to sentimentality or gratuitously personal complications. (In this he reminds me a lot of George Eliot.) This is what I love most about his writing: he can write about soul-wrenching, heartbreaking emotions without ever slipping into schmaltz or any kind of "martyr-ish" undercurrent. I suspect that has something to do with his subtle and exact use of humor and irony. He never gets lazy and lapses into the so-called post-modern pose of irony for irony's sake.

I did recognize some ancedotes from _Year of Rhymes_ and _Truth Serum_ but as repeats, those didn't bother me at all. I actually liked them. That I already had mental images of his parents and his childhood in Los Angeles gave me a backdrop that made _Bill from_ even more emotionally accessable. Corny as it might be, the analogy fits: it was like learning more about a friend whom I already knew a little.

There is a lot of nobility in this book, and it's genuine. The real impact of the whole story came in slowly, bit by bit, recognizing the nobility and dignity of the uber-curmudgeon Edward Cooper and at the same time being somewhat in awe of the author's capacity for understanding and forgivness -- of both himself and his father.
Balladolbine
Every once in a while a really gripping memoir comes along and you, the reader, nod your head and say to yourself 'Yes, I know that feeling' or 'Aren't all our loved ones have loveable quirks and failings?" This book is a real gem that is a beautiful nod to an unknowable father who is so very human that you fall in love with him, his polyester jumpsuit, his infuriating flaws and the love a son still holds for him. Gorgeous and gripping.
Jothris
Bernard Cooper truly has a way with words. "The Bill from My Father" is a feast for any logophile; both rich in detail and beautifully selected words. Cooper's father likely reminds any reader of someone in their own family, if not their very own father or parent(s). I thoroughly enjoyed this book and found myself laughing at his father's cantankerous ways and biting comebacks and, then, crying as Cooper tries to come to terms with parenting his parent and his father's passing.
Marilbine
Who needs James Frey making up sensationalistic details and calling it memoir when we have Bernard Cooper whose brilliant writing makes ordinary experience fantastic, who slows down the rush of time that constitutes our everyday lives to find the most poignant, most telling, most-in-danger-of-being-lost-forever moments and, in the telling, renders them sublime? If you want to see what memoir at its best is capable of, read The Bill from My Father. In it, Cooper captures the universal mysteriousness of having parents: how could these people be both so like us, and so completely foreign to us? How could they seem like both the only parents we could possibly have, and as arbitrary as if the stork dropped us by accident on their doorstep? This book is hysterically funny, terribly sad, and heart-achingly beautiful. Bravo.
Agarus
In a sincere, humorous, yet deeply compassionate memoir, Cooper limns the complex relationship that all fathers and sons know too well. Without glossing over the inevitable conflicts, he offers a well-rounded portrait of his admittedly irascible and puzzling father, suggesting but never sentimentalizing the pain that lies at the core of their relationship. Cooper's eye for the telling detail has never been sharper, his courage as a memoirist never clearer. Essential reading for anyone who's ever been or had a parent.
Interesting, compelling story at the beginning, story seemed to slow down abruptly towards the end. Well written. A quick easy read. Gave it 4 stars because the ending seemed to fall flat.