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ISBN:0393322610
Author: Maxine Kumin
ISBN13: 978-0393322613
Title: Inside the Halo and Beyond: The Anatomy of a Recovery
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ePUB size: 1316 kb
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Language: English
Category: Arts and Literature
Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company (November 17, 2001)
Pages: 208

Inside the Halo and Beyond: The Anatomy of a Recovery by Maxine Kumin



Personal Name: Kumin, Maxine, 1925-. Publication, Distribution, et. New York On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Inside the halo and beyond : the anatomy of a recovery, Maxine Kumin.

She tells of her time "inside the halo," the near-medieval device that kept her head immobile during weeks of intensive care and In July 1998, when Maxine Kumin's horse bolted at a carriage-driving clinic, she was not expected to live. Yet, less than a year later, her progress pronounced a miracle by her doctors, she was at work on this journal of her astonishing recovery  . Maxine Kumin's 17th poetry collection, published in the spring of 2010, is Where I Live: New and Selected Poems 1990-2010. Her awards include the Pulitzer and Ruth Lilly Poetry Prizes, the Poets’ Prize, and the Harvard Arts and Robert Frost Medals.

In July 1998, when Maxine Kumin's horse bolted at a carriage-driving clinic, she was not expected to live. She tells of her time "inside the halo," the near-medieval device that kept her head immobile during weeks of intensive care and rehabilitation, of the lasting "rehab" friendships, and of the loving family who always believed she would heal. he resonates wisdom while announcing a triumph of body and soul

Maxine Kumin brings the sensitivity and imagination of a poet to her extraordinary ordeal. - Richard Selzer, author of Mortal Lessons: Notes on the Art of Surgery. Maxine Kumin (1925―2014), a former . poet laureate, was the author of nineteen poetry collections as well as numerous works of fiction and nonfiction. Her awards included the Pulitzer Prize, the Ruth Lilly Poetry Prize, the Aiken Taylor Award, the Poet’s Prize, and the Harvard Arts and Robert Frost medals.

Kumin tells of her time "inside the halo," the near-medieval device that kept her head immobile during the weeks of intensive care and rehabilitation. During the long evenings she gets hooked on the Red Sox, muses on the state of the world, and forms lasting "rehab" friendships. She salutes the loving family who always believed she would heal and who "kept the garden going as a way of keeping me going. Maxine Kumin is the kind of person about whom it is said "they don't make them like that any more

Inside the Halo And Beyond The Anatomy Of a Recovery Maxine Kumin (Norton). Maxine Kumin lives in Vermont, and has a great fondness for horses and riding. Several years ago, as she was going about in her four-wheeled "marathon" carriage, her horse panicked. Kumin fell out and under the wheels and broke her spine. Inside the Halo is a description of her six months of recovery (as of the writing of the book, she is still weak, but is able to walk and, indeed, at the very end, returns to ride the same horse that nearly killed her).

Publisher: W. W. Norton & Company. Print ISBN: 9780393322613, 0393322610. eText ISBN: 9780393348002, 0393348008. Save up to 80% by choosing the eTextbook option for ISBN: 9780393348002, 0393348008. The print version of this textbook is ISBN: 9780393322613, 0393322610.

the anatomy of a recovery. 1st ed. by Maxine Kumin. Published 2000 by W. Norton in New York. In library, Driving of horse-drawn vehicles, American Poets, Patients, Spinal cord, Biography, Wounds and injuries. Maxine Kumin (1925-).

Topics Kumin, Maxine, 1925-, Spinal cord - Wounds and injuries - Patients - United States - Biography, Poets, American - 20th century - Biography, Driving of horse-drawn vehicles. Publisher W. Norton. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. Digitizing sponsor Internet Archive. Contributor Internet Archive. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by Lotu Tii on July 24, 2014.

Maxine Kumin (née Winokur) was born to a Reform Jewish family in Germantown, Pennsylvania. She attended Catholic and public schools before earning a BA and MA from Radcliffe College and married Victor Kumin in 1946 while still a student, and she would have two daughters and a son. On her early writing days, Kumin remarked, began writing poetry in the Dark Ages of the '50s with very little sense of who I was-a wife, a daughter, a mother, a college instructor, a swimmer, a horse lover, a hermit. She was able to make a successful recovery, however, and her book Inside the Halo and Beyond: The Anatomy of a Recovery (1999) described her convalescence.

"Here is a singular story of survival, an earthly miracle wrought by family devotion, gardens, horses, guts. A compelling read."―Carolyn Heilbrun

In July 1998, when Maxine Kumin's horse bolted at a carriage-driving clinic, she was not expected to live. Yet, less than a year later, her progress pronounced a miracle by her doctors, she was at work on this journal of her astonishing recovery. She tells of her time "inside the halo," the near-medieval device that kept her head immobile during weeks of intensive care and rehabilitation, of the lasting "rehab" friendships, and of the loving family who always believed she would heal. "[S]he resonates wisdom while announcing a triumph of body and soul."―Anne Roiphe, New York Times Book Review "Maxine Kumin brings the sensitivity and imagination of a poet to her extraordinary ordeal."―Richard Selzer, author of Mortal Lessons: Notes on the Art of Surgery "From a singular experience she has created a lesson that is universal, which, it seems to me, is the essence of being a poet."―Abraham Verghese, author of The Tennis Partner
Reviews: 7
Eseve
Pulitzer prize winning poet-naturalist Maxine Kumin chronicles a period of nine months, from the horrible horse-and-carriage accident that left her with a 5% chance of survival, and an even tinier prospect of ever walking again, to the time she is once again able to scramble up steep hills on her farm in New Hampshire again, albeit with difficulty. Hers is a statistically improbable recovery brought about not just by discipline and determination, and certainly not by faith (she is an atheist), but by love -- her family's love of her, and her own love not just for husband, children and grandchildren, but for horses, dogs, birds, vegetable garden, the seasons, and above all art and her craft. A passionate biophiliac, Kumin's love of nature can not be separated from her love of others, or her will to survive. This is an inpsirational book at so many levels. I completed it within hours of getting my hands on it, with my husband (a medical doctor) urging me to keep going, because I was reading it out loud to him and to my thirteen year old son. Inside the Halo... is wise, upbeat, gorgeously written and utterly inspirational. Someone you know scheduled for an operation? Had an accident? Run into some discouraging news? Forget the card. Send this book.
Blueshaper
I read while sitting home this Summer recovering from a broken bone in my left foot. Her injuries were far more severe and her recovery longer and much more difficult but, when one sits and waits to heal and there is little else that can be done, the words of strenght and re assurance from thoe who have "been there"are a balm to the soul and carry us along the road to recovery. This book prompted me to read more of Maxine's works, and I treasure them all.
Der Bat
Working in healthcare makes this book much more interesting to read. We tend to forget that patients are human beings sometimes, when we are lost in our daily routine of a very stressful job. This book is a gift not only to patients, but to those who take care of them also.
Yla
I liked the total and unashamed honesty. I liked the medical information. I liked the writing. I liked the woman.
Nalaylewe
Excellent read
Mavegar
Like many of Maxine Kumin's devoted reader/fan/friends, I came to her poetry through Anne Sexton's poetry/life.
However, as wonderful as Sexton's poetry is, and I love Anne Sexton's poetry, Maxine Kumin's poetry and prose can well stand on its own considerable merits.
Inside The Halo is a wonderful, gutsy, thoughtful book.
Having had some "orthopedic trauma" myself, though nowhere as severe as the accident Kumin survived, I can attest to the abundant truth she tells about the frustrations and joys of rehabilitation, and the "tough tenderness" of the best therapists.
Kumin also speaks movingly of how her amazing husband, children, and grandchildren rallied to see her through.
This is a difficult book to write about, because words like "uplifting" have become debased with casual use.
However, I am of the unshakable opinion that all doctors, nurses, therapists, and lovers of great writing would find something real in this fine book.
Mori
Putting thoughts into words is the salvation of many, particularly Maxine Kumin, who describes her recovery from paralysis in "Inside the Halo and Beyond." I was recently paralyzed myself, so I keenly identified with the account of her rehabilitation. Yet I felt pangs of jealousy because she walks again and the chances are nil this will happen to me.
Still, this book deserves an all-star rating for Kumin's eloquent and starkly honest description of her connections to poetry, literature, current events, international suffering, nature, equestrian riches, gardening, familial and friendly relations. She evokes empapthy and compassion without resorting to sappy sentiment or references to God. She explains, "My agnosticism eroded eventually to the skeletal remains of atheism and there I still stand. I'm not sure whether I should envy or pity the faith of others. Yes, it would be nice to have, but it seems a luxury of pietism I cannot afford."
Her love of words is eloquent: "I've always been a galloping reader, racing for information, hurtling past intervening advertisements or cartoons, breathless and fascinated with language."
It's a fine book.