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ISBN:0375758992
Author: Alexandra Fuller
ISBN13: 978-0375758997
Title: Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood
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ePUB size: 1482 kb
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Language: English
Category: Arts and Literature
Publisher: Random House Trade Paperbacks (March 11, 2003)
Pages: 336

Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight: An African Childhood by Alexandra Fuller



African dawn, noisy with animals and the servants and Dad waking up and a tractor coughing into life somewhere down at the workshop, clutters into the room. The bantam hens start to crow and stretch, tumbling out of their roosts in the tree behind the bathroom to peck at the reflection of themselves in the window. Dad and I go to bed with half the dogs. The other half of the pack set themselves up on the chairs in the sitting room. Dad’s half deaf, from when he blew his eardrums out in the war eight years ago in what was then Rhodesia.

Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, a memoir of life with Alexandra Fuller and her family on a farm in Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe. After the Rhodesian Bush War ended in 1980, the Fullers moved to Malawi, and then to Zambia. Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight won the Winifred Holtby Memorial Prize in 2002, was a New York Times Notable Book for 2002 and a finalist for The Guardian's First Book Award, an award given to the best regional novel of the year.

Personal Name: Fuller, Alexandra, 1969- Childhood and youth. Geographic Name: Zimbabwe History Chimurenga War, 1966-1980 Personal narratives, British. Rubrics: Girls Zimbabwe Biography British Large type books. by compiled by William Cole ; illustrated by Ruth Sanderson. On this site it is impossible to download the book, read the book online or get the contents of a book. The administration of the site is not responsible for the content of the site. The data of catalog based on open source database. All rights are reserved by their owners. Download book Don't let's go to the dogs tonight : an African childhood, Alexandra Fuller.

In wry and In Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, Alexandra Fuller remembers her African childhood with candor and sensitivity. Though it is a diary of an unruly life in an often inhospitable place, it is suffused with Fuller’s endearing ability to find laughter, even when there is little to celebrate. Fuller’s debut is unsentimental and unflinching but always captivating. In wry and sometimes hilarious prose, she stares down disaster and looks back with rage and love at the life of an extraordinary family in an extraordinary time.

ISBN 13: 9781588360496. org to approved e-mail addresses. Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them. 1. Afro-Eccentricity: Beyond the Standard Narrative of Black Religion.

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About the Book In Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, Alexandra Fuller remembers her African childhood with candor and sensitivity. Though it is a diary of an unruly life in an often inhospitable place, it is suffused with Fuller's endearing ability to find laughter, even when there is little to celebrate.

From the Inside Flap. In "Don't Let's Go to the Dogs Tonight, Alexandra Fuller remembers her African childhood with candor and sensitivity. Fuller's debut is unsentimental and unflinching but always captivating.

Anne Enright marvels at Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight, Alexandra Fuller’s intense memoir of growing up in Rhodesia. What happens when it’s all your fault, and not your fault at all? At the centre of Alexandra Fuller’s first memoir is a terrible, avoidable death for which she, as a child, feels responsible. Nothing about it makes sense, except in a magical way, and her eyes are opened by that incomprehension to see the world with the stalled, wise gaze of an eight-year-old girl. It is not a troubled gaze, though she lives through troubled times; it is just endlessly accurate.

NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER • A worthy heir to Isak Dinesen and Beryl Markham, Alexandra Fuller shares visceral memories of her childhood in Africa, and of her headstrong, unforgettable mother. “This is not a book you read just once, but a tale of terrible beauty to get lost in over and over.”—Newsweek “By turns mischievous and openhearted, earthy and soaring . . . hair-raising, horrific, and thrilling.”—The New Yorker Though it is a diary of an unruly life in an often inhospitable place, Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight is suffused with Fuller’s endearing ability to find laughter, even when there is little to celebrate. Fuller’s debut is unsentimental and unflinching but always captivating. In wry and sometimes hilarious prose, she stares down disaster and looks back with rage and love at the life of an extraordinary family in an extraordinary time. From 1972 to 1990, Alexandra Fuller—known to friends and family as Bobo—grew up on several farms in southern and central Africa. Her father joined up on the side of the white government in the Rhodesian civil war, and was often away fighting against the powerful black guerilla factions. Her mother, in turn, flung herself at their African life and its rugged farm work with the same passion and maniacal energy she brought to everything else. Though she loved her children, she was no hand-holder and had little tolerance for neediness. She nurtured her daughters in other ways: She taught them, by example, to be resilient and self-sufficient, to have strong wills and strong opinions, and to embrace life wholeheartedly, despite and because of difficult circumstances. And she instilled in Bobo, particularly, a love of reading and of storytelling that proved to be her salvation. Alexandra Fuller writes poignantly about a girl becoming a woman and a writer against a backdrop of unrest, not just in her country but in her home. But Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight is more than a survivor’s story. It is the story of one woman’s unbreakable bond with a continent and the people who inhabit it, a portrait lovingly realized and deeply felt.Praise for Don’t Let’s Go to the Dogs Tonight“Riveting . . . [full of] humor and compassion.”O: The Oprah Magazine “The incredible story of an incredible childhood.”The Providence Journal
Reviews: 7
Gardall
The mum said it best: we’re all mad but I’m the only one with a
certificate to prove it “
I found the language in this book entertaining with many different expressions I hadn’t heard before such as “pecker up”.
The author lives in Wyoming but loves loves loves Africa. Why? Beats me. The horrendous floods after the land first dries to a crisp, the snakes, hippos, lack of clean water and flushable toilets. Is it any wonder they’re all mad? They all start drinking beer at a young age so the get togethers are drunken parties and the parties go on for days. A result of not being able to drink the water perhaps?
All in all I loved the book and learning about a curious lifestyle.
Nilabor
This is a revalation to me about the history and living conditions in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe. The author's love of the land comes through so clearly in spite of all the hardships. Her family was so quirky and fun to know about but the sad undertones were always present. She seldom feels sorry for herself so I went along with her for the ride amazed at all the hardships they endured. The dichotomy of white superiority vs helping all who came along no matter who they were was revealing.
Gagas
This hauntingly beautiful and often humorous memoir about the author's Rhodesian childhood perfectly embodies that age-old mantra of our writing teachers, show, don't tell! Fuller's prose "shows" us a clear, unsentimental picture of Africa in the latter half of the twentieth century. It shows us everything: the striking beauty of the terrain, the landmines, the poverty, the violence, the vestiges of colonial life. She shows us the eccentricities of her parents, farmers whose combination of ethnocentrism and heartfelt humanitarianism are sure to befuddle we 21st century American readers with our predilection for putting people into distinct categories. She shows us this with stunning, evocative prose. And she doesn't tell us things. She doesn't politicize in either direction. She doesn't allow her narrative to be perforated with a million post-colonial caveats, admonitions and qualifications. She tells us neither that her parents were racist nor that they were saints. She doesn't editorialize about the legitimacy of her parents' love for Africa, or the fact that they considered it their rightful home. She simply shows us what her life was like in a way that makes a girl from a suburb of Los Angeles feel as though she were really there.

The fact that Alexandra Fuller chooses "showing" over "telling" has led some readers to call this book "Anti-African" and others to call it "detached." Readers will take from it what they will, but I found it to be neither of these things. I found a memoir that renders a unique life in a unique time and place, with pathos, humor and eloquence.
Iaran
for the most part Alexandra Fuller writes a delightful account of her life growing up in Africa with a few years off in the UK. The one thing that keeps this book from getting five stars is that it was often hard to tell where she was in the story. It would be greatly helped if at the beginning of each chapter it said something like:
Chapter title
Botswana
1962
age 12
I've given the book to a friend so can't check what & where for the year/age but you get the idea.
Anayalore
I loved this book so much; the prose, the story. Very unusual and different from anything I've ever read. Such a fascinating upbringing and oddball family. Stunning descriptions and a great sense of place. I'd recommend this memoir to anyone. So glad it was a pick for my book club as I may not have thought of reading it otherwise.
Mitars Riders
I have read all of Ms. Fuller's books and liked all of them. I have a family member (sister) who lived in Africa for 15 years in Nigeria and Congo. While I always enjoyed her tales of travel and the expat life I also saw the downfall of her through the years.
It was sad. Alexandera's writings are sad. But she tells it like it was. I liked every word, every line. I have read parts of this book several times as I am so amazed at how young children can survive and learn and actually turn into such fascination , educated and well traveled people. But then that comes with their territory and their determination. Their exposures to the world away from the US certainly prepares them to have lived a full and interesting life. I am always struck by the stories they tell as told by their African staff and the love they have for each other as a family.
I would recommend another book told along these lines: The Power of One by Bryce Courtenay. Africa - Africa - Africa. Such stories to be told.
Castiel
I greatly enjoyed this book for several reasons. The author's prose is very well written, accessible, and easy to read. The book was written from the heart, with feeling, emotion, humor, and brutal honesty about the relationships between whites and blacks during a very tense and dangerous time, not only in Rhodesia/Zimbabwe, but in other nearby African countries. I think being written from a child's point of view allowed the author to write with the clear-eyed honesty that children often have. Having lived in northern Botswana myself from 1979 through 1981 and having travelled throughout the region, I knew many people, both black and white, like those described in the book. I can attest that the portrayal of inter-racial relationships is accurate and the dangers from the various governments' militaries while traveling in Zimbabwe, Rhodesia, Malawi, and even Botswana, as described in the book, were very real. I would recommend this book to anyone as it covers a wide range of topics and emotions. If you are obsessed by political correctness, this book will likely make you uncomfortable, which is all the more reason you should read it.