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Download Matters of Light & Depth epub book
ISBN:0966250400
Author: Various,Ross Lowell
ISBN13: 978-0966250404
Title: Matters of Light & Depth
Format: lit mobi txt lrf
ePUB size: 1235 kb
FB2 size: 1820 kb
DJVU size: 1474 kb
Language: English
Category: Photography and Video
Publisher: Lower Light Management; 1st edition (April 1, 1999)
Pages: 224

Matters of Light & Depth by Various,Ross Lowell



Author Ross Lowell is a professional cinematographer, still photographer, and occasional director and producer. Of the hundreds of documentaries, short films, and TV commercials that he has shot, directed, and produced, many have earned special recognition: an Academy Award, several addtional Academy Award nominations, Golden Eagle Awards, Emmy Awards, and Art Director's Club Awards, among others. First of all, let me say that I think this is the best book on lighting that I've read. Of course it's from the lighting man himself Ross Lowell. This is the guy that is responsible for the Lowel Light company. In the Lowel catelog, you'll find the most useful lighting equiptment you could ever ask for. This is also the guy who invented gaffer's tape. Anyway, Ross Lowell is a camera man/lighting director who's been around for a while and I really like his approach to the subject.

Matters of Light & Depth book. In addition to his own techniques, photos, and light philosophy, Ross Lowell interweaves the insights and images of distinguished lighting directors, photographers, filmmakers, and classic painters. Some of the subjects explored include: Color Temperature Matters Hearing the Light Lighting Planes Lig Creating memorable images for video, film, & stills through lighting.

Creating memorable images for video, film, & stills through lighting.

Lowell shooting a scene for Oh Brother, My Brother (1979). Lowell worked on hundreds of documentaries, short films and television commercials Contents.

Cinematography, Lighting, Photography, Video recording.

Ross Lowell was a man of many talents who had more than 25 patents to his name, created a lighting company and created gaffer tape, a staple in the camera bags of photographers and cinematographers the world over. Above is a video he participated in wherein he talks about various lighting tools and techniques

Ross Lowell was born on 10 July 1926 in New York City. He started his career as a photographer in the US Navy during World War II. In 1948, Lowell decided to study cinematography at UCLA (University of California, Los Angeles). Fresh from school, he started to work in the film and television industries. Ad. The Career of an Inventor. Also, Ross Lowell was more than an artist and technician. At the end of the 50s, documentary director Stephen E. Fleischman asked Ross Lowell to create a lightweight and discreet lighting system for a TV show. Then, Lowell imagined an articulated ball-and-clamp system to attach an RFL bulb. On the back of the light, there was a metal plate so that he could attach it to any surface, may it was permanent or not. The first Lowel-Light was born.

Matters of Light & Depth by Ross Lowell, Various. Matters of Light & Depth by Ross Lowell, Various ePub version. 1245 downloads at 34 mb/s. Matters of Light & Depth by Ross Lowell, Various PDF version. 1742 downloads at 32 mb/s. Some of the subjects explored include: Color Temperature Matters Hearing the Light Lighting Planes Lighting People Meter Matters Finessing the Light Motivating the Light Two-Light Techniques The One-Light Approach Setting Up a Small Studio Superior Exterior Lighting The Art & Craft of Lighting Craft & Art Best Ways to Achieve the Worst Lighting.

This book constitutes the refereed proceedings of the 14th Scandinavian Conference on Image Analysis, SCIA 2005, held in Joensuu, Finland in June 2005. The 124 papers presented to. .Read Online Download Full.

Lowell, who was known for his work in the film industry, also invented a swivelling ball-and-clamp system for mounting lights, and wrote a book called Matters of Light and Depth: Creating Memorable Images for Video, Film and Stills Through Lighting. He won an Academy Award for Technical Achievement in 1980 for his compact lighting system. In case you were wondering, we’re assuming that it’s from the film industry that Lowell’s famously versatile tape got its name: ‘the gaffer’ is the colloquial title given to the chief electrician in a movie or television production unit

Creating memorable images for video, film, & stills through lighting. In addition to his own techniques, photos, and light philosophy, Ross Lowell interweaves the insights and images of distinguished lighting directors, photographers, filmmakers, and classic painters. Some of the subjects explored include: Color Temperature Matters Hearing the Light Lighting Planes Lighting People Meter Matters Finessing the Light Motivating the Light Two-Light Techniques The One-Light Approach Setting Up a Small Studio Superior Exterior Lighting The Art & Craft of Lighting Craft & Art Best Ways to Achieve the Worst Lighting
Reviews: 7
Ventelone
First of all, let me say that I think this is the best book on lighting that I've read. Of course it's from the lighting man himself Ross Lowell. This is the guy that is responsible for the Lowel Light company. In the Lowel catelog, you'll find the most useful lighting equiptment you could ever ask for. This is also the guy who invented gaffer's tape.
Anyway, Ross Lowell is a camera man/lighting director who's been around for a while and I really like his approach to the subject. He treats lighting as a craft that's independent of the medium that you choose. This book teaches lighting for film, video, and stills by showing you basic principals that apply to all mediums. The book is full of Ross Lowell (and other photographers) excellent photos illustrating various types of lighting.
This book isn't a real easy read... at least not as easy as I thought it would be. If you really want to understand lighting, here's my recommendation. Buy this book, request a Lowel catelog via the web, read Lighting for Digital Video (can be found here at amazon.com), and request a lighting catelog from B&H. Study both catelogs and read both books. You should also try to pick up the different kinds of basic lights from Ebay so you can expiriment and do some of the excercises found in this book.
This book also contains an awesome glossary that contains all the lighting terms you could ever want defined. Albeit, some of the definitions are rather useless (see Lighthand). Another great thing is that the author doesn't use this book as an excuse to plug his lighting supplies like he could have.
One last thing. If you are a still photographer that only plans on using strobes for your lighting and have little or no interest in video, film, or continuous lighting... you may not like this book or find it very useful. However, if you're like me and shoot video and take pictures you'll love it.
Velellan
This is a great starter book to get if you have never done any lighting before - whether for video, cinema, or still photography. Lots of great tips and tricks that typically are missing from other lighting books. Lowell takes the concepts and precepts of lighting and presents them in abstract form so that you can adapt them to whatever lighting situation you may have. This book may not work for you if you are the kind of person who needs step by step how-to in order to get things done - in fact it is debatable that ANY book could do so effectively because every shoot is unique. But if you are good at thinking intuitively and abstractly then his presentation of the material is great because it teaches principals (with some examples) and not technique.

My one complaint is the typsetting of the book. The use of a modern typeface makes reading difficult (looks like a bodoni variant). The publishers should really re-publish the book to make it more legible.
POFOD
I bought it something like a year ago and it was my first book on traditional lighting, so I postponed till I can compare it with the other ones.
First about the book itself. It is illustrated in a 18-th century engraving style, which is peculiar and looks antique, being humorous from time to time. I find this exciting and making the book stand out from a pretty usual design of other books about lighting.

The book is aimed mainly towards movie lighting, so it has a very brief explanation of how surfaces are affected by lighting and how to light metal, glass etc. From another point, it has unique explanations about the rules of lighting and when to break them.
It has a very well-organized explanation of "how much lights to use", starting from a 1-point lighting setup to many. Very good summarizations of general ways of good lighting. It is a poetic book from time to time, and has practical lessons, which I found very important and helpful to me. The author tried to make not simply a book, but to inspire a novice with good illustrations, and beautiful poetic language among puns (he is a writer too). Quite a brief insight of cinematography and composition. Yet some practical considerations about the effective use of light fixtures.
So fat I'd say it's the most interesting and valuable book about lighting for me (and was recommended by a lighter Chris Nichols).
Arryar
Good book for beginners, but wish there were more lighting diagrams.
Nafyn
For those of us who seem mystified by why their videos look so...well, bad, Matters of Light and Depth offers valuable insights into the subtle and not so subtle qualities of light. Some of the material presented looks at still photography, and some takes advantage of classic artists whose tools were oil paint and canvas. All in all, while Matters of Light and Depth does not offer a "by the numbers" approach to lighting scenes, it does provide strong aesthetic considerations, as well as pithy quotations from people who "do lighting." It's worth looking at. And the glossary is entertaining, as well. Basically, you just can't beat something from Ross Lowell.
Viashal
Great intro to the theory and thinking behind film and photography lighting. Very little about the gear ( and some of that somewhat dated), but a lot about light and the mental process.
Manesenci
I admire Ross Lowell's inventions enormously. His lights, while not as robust as others and so not so well suited to rental houses, are a great tool for the beginning owner-operator. I began with his Lowel Lights and moved up to his D-heads. I remember them all fondly, even though I no longer use them.

After many years as a director of photography, I've begun to teach lighting and have been looking at book options for my students. So far the best book I've found on this topic is Blain Brown's "Motion Picture and Video Lighting". While the layout of Lowell's book is stunning, as are many of the images, Lowell approaches each section with long lists which to my mind do nothing to inspire the thinking eye. With great respect for Lowell, I regretfully report that for me his book is for the encyclopediast, not for the emerging eye.