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ISBN:0571164498
Author: David Caute
ISBN13: 978-0571164493
Title: Joseph Losey: A Revenge on Life
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ePUB size: 1365 kb
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Language: English
Category: Performing Arts
Publisher: Faber Faber Inc; First Edition edition (January 1, 1994)
Pages: 591

Joseph Losey: A Revenge on Life by David Caute



Ranging from Losey's beginnings with experimental theatre in New York to his death in 1984 at the age of 75, author David Caute provide a compelling portrait of a hugely driven talent, whose creative generosity, alcohol addiction, and often brutal egotism continue to elicit fierce and wildly divergent reactions. Drawing on candid interviews with Losey's associates and members of his casts and crews, Caute sheds important light on Losey's personal life, especially his ambivalent relationship with his mother Ina, a manipulatively flirtatious woman whom Caute believes inspired the.

Caute traces Losey's career in a needlessly complicated structure of flash-forwards and flashbacks, beginning with the 1963 triumph of The Servant, his first collaboration with screenwriter Harold Pinter. He then moves back to Losey's childhood in Wisconsin (Losey was one of a trio of great filmmakers from that state who emerged in Hollywood in the '40s, the others being Orson Welles and Nicholas Ray), his years at Dartmouth, his budding radicalism, his stage work in the '30s, and onward to his Hollywood work. David Caute paints a very fair political, psychological and professional portrait of the movie director Joseph Losey. Losey was a child of the Great Depression. The dire straits of so many people turned him into a convinced leftist. This book gives an extremely lively picture of the exhausting film business and is a must read for all movie fans. 2 people found this helpful.

On the evidence of David Caute's inquiries among both friends and foes, Joseph Losey was an unregenerate shit. Caute doesn't set out to do a Kitty Kelley - he doesn't need to - and, never having met Losey, he has no personal scores to settle. One wishes, then, that he had resisted referring to his subject as 'Joe', an impertinence that nags throughout the book. He adhered to these resolutions all his life, and not merely within a professional sphere. Never short of female company, he treated most women - including the four he married - with callous disregard, a legacy perhaps of his unsatisfactory relationship with his mother. She is, according to Caute, 'the ghost in the machine of his art' and was, in the words of one of Losey's friends, 'difficult, cantankerous, domineeering, ungracious, ungrateful, not very likeable'. Mother and son clearly had plenty in common.

Joseph Losey: A Revenge on Life, London & Boston: Faber & Faber, 1994; New York: Oxford University Press, 1994. Dr. Orwell and Mr. Blair: A Novel, London: Weidenfeld & Nicolson, 1994. Animal Fun Park, a radio drama, BBC Radio, 1995. Fatima's Scarf, London: Totterdown Books, 1998. The Dancer Defects, Oxford University Press, 2003. Marechera and the Colonel, London: Totterdown Books, 2009. Politics and the Novel During the Cold War, New Jersey: Transaction, 2010.

Joseph Losey: A Revenge on Life. The Cinema Of Joseph Losey.

Joseph Losey (1909-1984). Pete Roleum and His Cousins (short, 1939) Home Vision Entertainment (R1) – included on Time Without Pity (download here). Youth Gets a Break (short, 1941). A Child Went Forth (short, 1941). Conversations with Losey by Michael Ciment (Law Book Co of Australasia, 1985). Joseph Losey: A Revenge on Life by David Caute (Faber and Faber, 1994).

Find nearly any book by Caute,David (page 2). Get the best deal by comparing prices from over 100,000 booksellers. ISBN 9780718122607 (978-0-7181-2260-7) Hardcover, Michael Joseph Ltd, 1983. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Learn More at LibraryThing. Caute,David at LibraryThing. Results page: PREV 1 2.

Publisher: London : Faber, 1994. Summary: This is a biography of the film director Joseph Losey. It looks into how Losey was acclaimed in Europe, yet ignored by Hollywood and his alcoholism and appraises his 31 films, including "The Servant", "Accident", "The Go-Between" and "Don Giovanni".

Books by Caute, David. Joseph Losey a Revenge On Life. The illusion; an essay on politics, theatre, and the novel. Politics and the novel during the Cold War. by Caute, David. Communism and the French intellectuals, 1914-1960.

Publication date 1994. Topics Losey, Joseph, Motion picture producers and directors - United States - Biography. Publisher Oxford University Press. Collection inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china. page 531-536 are missing in the original book.

This is a biography of the film director Joseph Losey. It looks into how Losey was acclaimed in Europe, yet ignored by Hollywood and his alcoholism and appraises his 31 films, including "The Servant", "Accident", "The Go-Between" and "Don Giovanni".
Reviews: 5
Celore
Success seems to have eluded Joe. There is something about Losey that prevented this talented director from achieving "success" especially in the US. I would consider him "underrated" based on the few films that aren't the self-indulgent ones. Most directors are "difficult" people to live with and often to work with- but they still seem to get it right for 2 or 3 unforgettable films. Poor Joe- was his own worst enemy it seems.
Ahieones
I would recommend this biography to everyone interested in film.
There story's well told and mostly accurate.
David Coate never knew Losey, so he makes lots of educated guesses, and some of them are off base.
I knew Losey very well over 18 years (he mentions this frequently in the book) and feel he listened a bit too much to people
with axes to grind, but that in itself is not uninteresting.
It's a fascinating if quite fanciful portrait of one of the all-time great film directors and his tempestuous life.
John Loring
Micelhorav
I love Losey dearly, one of my favorite film-makers, but to characterize him as a child of the great depression, as the reviewer below does, is flat-out bizarre; he was a child of the mid-western extremely wealthy upper-class, who he described as puritains, and spent his entire life rebelling against. Communism was just an escape valve, as was sleeping with every woman who crossed his path, or never compromising as an artist while attempting to live wildly beyond his means, living more lavishly than the aristocracy his films skewered. He was a deeply troubled person, who was hyper-self critical and worked out many of his obsessions and neurosis with great objectivity in his films. This book provides excellent background, but is a tad mean-spirited. But the documentation is thorough...however...

Michel Ciment's "Losey on Losey," a 500 page interview conducted over the last decade of Losey's life, a worthy counter-balance, it is basically an autobiography, and along with Michael Powell's Proustian memoir and Ray Carney's Cassavetes on Cassavetes, the best film-maker autobio ever. Losey doesn't merely speak about himself with rare candor, he talks about the process of directing in a way that is actually instructive for students. And I do mean process: Losey had a highly systematic, unchanging method for approaching any project, and his discussion of form and function and design is reminiscent of another American exile/internationalist/refugee from WASP upper-class puritainism, Henry James (Losey loves James, and I think they resemble each other more than they do other artists in their own medium).
Malogamand
David Caute paints a very fair political, psychological and professional portrait of the movie director Joseph Losey.

Losey was a child of the Great Depression. The dire straits of so many people turned him into a convinced leftist. It cost him dearly: he was blacklisted by Hollywood for being a `communist'.

He found work in Europe and the convinced leftist changed his attitude into `being on the left is already enough'.

He was an ambitious, energetic, tenacious person, who was also self-absorbed, self-destructive (alcoholism) and frustrated. In fact, he was never really happy. He was torn between, on the one hand, his Puritan morality (a work alcoholic desperate for work, shooting even commercials) and his rigid sense of responsibility and, on the other hand, the hedonistic existence of international show business.

Professionally, he was not a `movie author', but a writer's director, relying heavily on his screenwriters, e.g. Harold Pinter and David Mercer. He was a cinematographer, not an actor's director. Notwithstanding being a leftist, he didn't believe in message films, though, on the contrary, believed strongly in the star system.

His movie career was a long ferocious fight for and with projects, between Art and Profit. Once the budget was there, a continuous dirty battle with scripts, rights, actors, crew and producers (the money men) followed. And once the movie was finished and screened, a fierce exchange of arguments with movie critics, distributors and their marketing budgets turned into endless nightmares and an endless letter mails. Lack of box office success was one of the main reasons for the animosities.

He got also involved in battles between the super-egos of superstars (D. Bogarde: `What are you doing for the Welsh bastard (R. Burton)?')

His style is characterized by vacated space, track shots, separation of overheard conversation and image and clean cuts.

This book gives an extremely lively picture of the exhausting film business and is a must read for all movie fans.
Kerahuginn
this is a demonizing and opinionated dismissal of a man, of his work, of his life. Losey as a filmaker deserves appraisal without political destruction as it's sole motive. Caute's catty Sunday supplement thesis is only invective, not investigative, and is useless in placing a difficult and undismissable director as a flawed artist, who always demanded attention through and because of his work, and is memorable forever cinematicaly. Mr. Caute is a phlegmatic left-wing Rick Santorum. He serves no function, Losey did and does.