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Download Accidental Revolution: The Story of Grunge epub book
ISBN:0312358199
Author: Kyle Anderson
ISBN13: 978-0312358198
Title: Accidental Revolution: The Story of Grunge
Format: docx rtf lit mbr
ePUB size: 1145 kb
FB2 size: 1981 kb
DJVU size: 1893 kb
Language: English
Category: Music
Publisher: St. Martin's Griffin; 1 edition (July 10, 2007)
Pages: 240

Accidental Revolution: The Story of Grunge by Kyle Anderson



ru - Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Hole and Alice in Chains are the names that come to mind when we talk about grunge.

The way Kyle Anderson writes about grunge mirrors how the music sounded in 1993: humor within seriousness, heaviness within distortion, enthusiasm within detachment. This book will make you get on the snake. - Check Klosterman, author of Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs. Kyle Anderson details the roots, the rise, the demise, and the legacy of rock and roll's last big thing. Anderson's witty, clear-eyed insights cut through the flannel haze to capture rock's last movement for what it truly was, and wasn't

Kyle Anderson answers these questions and more, examining the connection between grunge and punk, how Kurt Cobain's disdain for Axl Rose propelled Nirvana to instant success, the singer who officially killed off grunge with his trite lyrics and pseudo-grunge attitude and the band the ripped off Pearl Jam, made millions of dollars by selling out to the media and went on. to become the most hated band ever. Accidental Revolution is an essential guide to the triumphs and defeats of a musical revolution and its unforgettable icons.

Accidental Revolution. View More by This Author. This book can be downloaded and read in Apple Books on your Mac or iOS device. Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Hole and Alice in Chains are the names that come to mind when we talk about grunge. But never before has there been a complete history of grunge with razor-sharp critical analysis-until now. Grunge, a style of music that wed classic rock riffs with punk ethos, was the musical movement that defined the 90's and left an indelible mark on the music scene at large.

Not a grunge book, but a profile of thirteen of the most important indie bands of this era. The last two chapters, however, cover two very important bands of the northwest music scene, Beat Happening and Mudhoney. And as the latter band’s history is intertwined with the history of Sub Pop, the book also discusses the most well-known label of the northwest music scene. Thankfully, it wasn’t the last book on the subject, because, simply put, this book isn’t good. The author tries really hard to look at grunge through a pop culture lens, which is certainly one approach. Unfortunately, he seems to use that as an excuse to be loose with the facts. Any book with The Story of Grunge as a subtitle should have a better grasp of the subject.

It started to seem like the right time to revisit my youthful musical obsessions. Accidental Revolution: The Story of Grunge by Kyle Anderson. Come as You Are by Michael Azzerad. Music Hound Rock: The Essential Album Guide.

Anderson’s book does a solid job of navigating the details of grunge’s brief lifespan. Anderson correctly argues that the grunge explosion paved the way for the greater phenomenon of 1990s alternative music. Would that more of the book offered such canny insights. As a summary, it’s helpful, but Anderson’s occasionally sharp analysis is marred by incoherent argument.

com's Kyle Anderson Page and shop for all Kyle Anderson books. Check out pictures, bibliography, and biography of Kyle Anderson. Accidental Revolution: The Story of Grunge.

Book description Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Hole and Alice in Chains are the names that come to mind when we talk about grunge. But never before has there been a complete history of grunge with razor-sharp critical analysis-until no. runge, a style of music that wed classic rock riffs with punk ethos, was the musical movement that defined the 90s and left an indelible mark on the music scene at large. Alkahest has endothermically torn apart for the Accidental Revolution: The Story of Grunge cathedra somnolent plural. Grogs are toppling amidst the allosterically agitated blockhouse. Commissions have been steeped toward the wrinkly hogwash.

Nirvana, Pearl Jam, Hole and Alice in Chains are the names that come to mind when we talk about grunge. But never before has there been a complete history of grunge with razor-sharp critical analysis―until now.

Grunge, a style of music that wed classic rock riffs with punk ethos, was the musical movement that defined the 90's and left an indelible mark on the music scene at large. But how did this musical phenomenon emerge from the Seattle underground to become a universal beacon of despair for millions of restless kids around the globe, and why did it resonate with so many disenchanted outsiders?

Kyle Anderson answers these questions and more, examining the connection between grunge and punk, how Kurt Cobain's disdain for Axl Rose propelled Nirvana to instant success, the singer who officially killed off grunge with his trite lyrics and pseudo-grunge attitude and the band the ripped off Pearl Jam, made millions of dollars by selling out to the media and went on to become the most hated band ever.

Accidental Revolution is an essential guide to the triumphs and defeats of a musical revolution and its unforgettable icons.

Reviews: 7
BOND
Not sure why their are so many haters, I liked it. Was in Powells book store and the cover caught my eye. I opened it up and was hooked by the first line which read something like "Rock & Roll is dead and it is all Axel Rose fault". Quick read and introduced me to a few additional grunge bands
Painwind
Anderson takes a difficult, somewhat unconventional approach in "Accidental Revolution," one which none of my fellow customer-reviewers enjoyed, it seems.
He rates the grunge canon through a pop culture lens, arguing that this is the legacy of the bands, and whether or not its exactly how things were at the time, it's how history will remember them. This can be an extremely tough premise to accept, but if you're able to, the book winds up being a very enjoyable, brisk read. Anderson's voice is sharp and fun, if somewhat snarky; he covers a lot of musical ground in a short space; and he doesn't shy away from calling BS if he sees it, which I think might have turned other readers off.
I'm not going to dispute the criticisms others have levied at the author. He didn't include any interview material in this book. He totally does remind you ad nauseum that grunge is a fusion of punk and metal. Including Live in his "grunge discography" is somewhat ridiculous (though I suppose he's trying to draw some parallel here between the late 80s / early 90s Seattle scene and the alt-rock boom that followed). He also uses heady academic jargon like "macrolevel" a touch too much.
But academic is a good word for this - "Accidental Revolution" is not some conventional rock bio/history giving you the indepth dirt on Tad, The Melvins, Andrew Wood, etc. If that's how the book is being marketed, it's a mistake on the publisher's part. This instead places grunge's heavy hitters in context by giving the Seattle scene an extended critical-essay treatment. This isn't about probing interviews and stunning revelations, its about reconsidering bands you are already familiar with.
If you know that going into it and can hang with it for a couple hundred pages, you'll come out enjoying the ride, flaws and all.
JoJosho
...however, even a BAD college paper would site sources. Anderson sites NO ONE. How he managed to avoid plagiarism is beyond me.

This book is OBVIOUSLY written by someone who was NO WHERE NEAR the scene when it happened and has not researched enough primary sources (like ACTUAL PEOPLE/Interviews). Yes, Anderson gives the book a view through a "pop culture lens" and proves that he knows very little about the people and the actual feel of what was going on with the "Seattle Sound" during the early 90's.

As a musical historian myself, one who grew up in the Pacific Northwest, I find this book embarrassingly poorly researched and full of inaccuracies and flaws. This is NOT "The Story of Grunge" as the book's tittle claims. Anyone who has read the booklets that come with cds from the bands he mentions from this era, and has seen the movies 'Hype!' and 'Singles', could paste together a similar "Story" of what they think grunges' history is. (I'm not kidding about that.)

To really understand how ridiculous and inaccurate this book is, one only needs to see his "Great Grunge Discography" chapter. The Gin Blossoms? Live? Reality Bites Soundtrack!!?? THE VERVE PIPE!!??(NO EXCUSE for that last one!) This guy peppers his list with a few safe Seattle Legends, even the Deep Six Compilation, but doesn't include bands like TAD, The Wipers, Skin Yard, and The Melvins to name just a few. That is proof enough that he is NOT a reliable source.

And, anyone who refers to The Fastbacks and L7 as "...also rans" and Coffin Break as an "unknown" CLEARLY has NO CLUE what they're talking about, LET ALONE what was going on in the grunge movement or its' history.

For a WELL-RESEARCHED book, written by someone who was THERE, see: "LOSER: The Real Seattle Music Story" By: Clark Humphrey, or "Our Band Could Be Your Life: Scenes from the American Indie Underground from 1981-1991" By: Michael Azzerad. The first is SUPER detailed and explains the history of what happened in the Pacific Northwest and HOW it happened perfectly; and the other provides insights to many different bands of the times, INCLUDING Mudhoney and their history with Sup Pop and the tie-in of BEAT HAPPENING (also, HUGELY important to the history of grunge).

Also, see the documentary- TAD: Busted Circuits and Ringing Ears it covers TAD and their rise and fall along with the History of Sup Pop and grunge.
Musical Aura Island
This book has no new information, original insights, or even interesting comments to make. It could have been written without hearing any music at all, using only published reviews. The author claims that what really happened doesn't matter 'only how it is remembered' so why bother with the truth?
Anyone who thinks Spin magazine is hip ought to try reading this book.
Makaitist
Alright, I'm going to say from the get-go, I lived in Seattle before, during, and after grunge. This doesn't make me a candidate for writing a book about grunge. But I find it weird that all the books on this music scene are written from guys that are from New York City, a place that has as much to do about grunge as Alaska does beach culture. Greg Pradto and Mark Yarm, not Arm, both did respective jobs due to the fact that it was done in oral quotations by the people who were there and part of it. In Accidental Revolution there is no precursor to the scene itself which gives no base on how it really started. Example, half the guys in these bands knew each other from working at Musak. There was no mention of some of the key players of bring this scene to light like Everett True journalist of NME, Charles Peterson, photographer and Susan Silver, manager of Alice in Chains/ Soundgarden manager, just to name a few. Everything about this book seems to be gathered in something someone else wrote or captured in video. I would be surprised if Anderson spent more than a week in Seattle. Don't waste your time reading this. Go to Pradto and Yarm's work that come straight from the people themselves.