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ISBN:0743264460
Author: Chuck Klosterman
ISBN13: 978-0743264464
Title: Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story
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ePUB size: 1467 kb
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Language: English
Category: Music
Publisher: Scribner; Reprint edition (June 13, 2006)
Pages: 272

Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story by Chuck Klosterman



Killing Yourself to Live: 85% of a True Story is a work of non-fiction written by Chuck Klosterman, first published by Scribner in 2005. The title is a reference to the 1973 song "Killing Yourself To Live", by the heavy metal band Black Sabbath. It is Klosterman's third book and focuses on the premise of writing about the relationship between love and death, particularly deaths involving music celebrities.

For 6,557 miles, Chuck Klosterman thought about dying. He drove a rental car from New York to Rhode Island to Georgia to Mississippi to Iowa to Minneapolis to Fargo to Seattle, and he chased death and rock ‘n’ roll all the way. Within the span of twenty-one days, Chuck had three relationships end-one by choice, one by chance, and one by exhaustion. He snorted cocaine in a graveyard. He walked a half-mile through a bean field

Killing Yourself to Live book. a funny and interesting guy. Finishing Killing Yourself to Live, I can only report that this book felt forced and pointless, and even if Klosterman went on to write the next big thing, I don't know if I feel like giving him another chance. Maybe in another ten years.

Chuck Klosterman is an acquired taste. If you are interested in anything Chuck Klosterman has to say, then this book is right up your alley. He talks about the two things he knows about most- music and himself.

Chuck Klosterman is the kind of guy who calls Rod Stewart "the single-greatest male singing voice of the rock era" and really means it. To people who think he's just being ironic, Klosterman asks, "Why would I want people to think that I like someone I do not actually like? What possible purpose would that serve?" It may be too much to say that Klosterman is on a mission to save rock 'n' roll from irony, but the Spin critic clearly favors sincerity.

Largehearted Boy Book Notes music playlist by Chuck Kosterman for his book, Killing Yourself to Live.

ISBN-13: 9780743264464. For 6,557 miles, Chuck Klosterman considered death. He drove a apartment automobile from manhattan to Rhode Island to Georgia to Mississippi to Iowa to Minneapolis to Fargo to Seattle, and he chased demise and rock 'n' roll all of the manner. in the span of twenty-one days, Chuck had 3 relationships finish - one via selection, one unintentionally, and one via exhaustion.

Building on the national bestselling success of Sex, Drugs, and Cocoa Puffs, preeminent pop culture writer Chuck Klosterman unleashes his best book yet—the story of his cross-country tour of sites where rock stars have died and his search for love, excitement, and the meaning of death.For 6,557 miles, Chuck Klosterman thought about dying. He drove a rental car from New York to Rhode Island to Georgia to Mississippi to Iowa to Minneapolis to Fargo to Seattle, and he chased death and rock ‘n’ roll all the way. Within the span of twenty-one days, Chuck had three relationships end—one by choice, one by chance, and one by exhaustion. He snorted cocaine in a graveyard. He walked a half-mile through a bean field. A man in Dickinson, North Dakota, explained to him why we have fewer windmills than we used to. He listened to the KISS solo albums and the Rod Stewart box set. At one point, poisonous snakes became involved. The road is hard. From the Chelsea Hotel to the swampland where Lynyrd Skynyrd’s plane went down to the site where Kurt Cobain blew his head off, Chuck explored every brand of rock star demise. He wanted to know why the greatest career move any musician can make is to stop breathing...and what this means for the rest of us.
Reviews: 7
Lesesshe
Chuck Klosterman is an acquired taste. But like a fine scotch or even an unfiltered cigarette, once you acquire that taste, you may find yourself inexorably addicted to his musings. This book isn't a story about the life and death of rock stars. It's not even a story about rock and roll really, it's a story about being a guy that loves music, sees his relationships through tunes and can't quite get out of the mindset of a teenage boy, even after crossing the age divide that is "being 30."

To be fair, Chuck's affinity for KISS and his turns of phrase when talking about the important ladies in his life is something all too familiar to this reader, but that's the kind of thing that makes this book essential. This book is like a road trip in itself, but more than that, it's kind of like meeting a new best friend in college - and you stay awake all night in your dorm, like for no reason - just because if you go to sleep, you won't be having this intense connection and friendship with them. So your focus drifts, you don't stick to the thesis of the conversation, your synapses fire and they find you tangentially relating the quintessential live recordings of Bruce Springsteen when you initially started talking about movies that you love and High Fidelity gets mentioned and there you go - Bruce is there.

But that's the beauty of this book. It's the relationships, insight to a lack of insight and emotionally stunted anecdotes of someone you want to meet when you meet someone new.

As a writer, reader and ultimately a massive KISS fan, I can't recommend this book enough... Though I know that it's not as cohesive as a book maybe should be... and he did bail on LA, which would have made for some good chapters... I still can't help but love this book. I enjoyed every page and I am sad that I'm not reading it anymore. So it's a 5/5... Yeah, I started it at a 4/5, but that empty want for more makes me think that it should be a 5/5.

Put on a good record, pour yourself a cocktail and turn on the lamp... This book is gonna hang out with you for a while.
Glei
If you are interested in anything Chuck Klosterman has to say, then this book is right up your alley. He talks about the two things he knows about most-- music and himself. I have reviewed him before as my "Brain Candy." It's so good when you read it, but you come away with it with just some empty calories. He is insightful about himself, but I feel duped when I read his books because I feel his sentiments aren't truly sincere. I feel he writes like he's on the debate team--always trying to sway you on to "his side", even though he's not even on his own side. Alas, he seems to have a ton of stories and I'd love to go drinking with him in some dive in Madison Wisconsin. So if you give a rat's patoot about Chuck's life and how it ties into all our own pathetic existences, go for it. He's quite the charmer.
Dagdatus
A very memorable book. Reading it for the second time. I first came across the book when I stumbled on a blog post about Radiohead which cites his famous analysis of how the album Kid A, released before 2001, supposedly predicted and arguably chronicles 9/11 hour by hour. He later notes that Thom Yorke mostly created the lyrics randomly. Klosterman is able to explain the nuances of our culture in a rarely skilled, incisive, accessible way. For example, he explains why national viewers found it "funny" that a contestant on The Bachelor said her favorite restaurant was The Olive Garden. We all know that is funny or laughable, but do we really know why? Klosterman nails it perfectly. You just have to read the book.
Ielonere
After having read and enjoyed "sex, drugs, and cocoa puffs" I was excited to see "Killing Yourself to Live" arrive on my doorstep.

What followed was a fantastic accounting of Klosterman's road trip through sites of famous Rock and Roll deaths. In this readers humble opinion the book starts off stronger than it ends. With the chapter about Chuck's visit to the site of the Station night club fire (where over 100 people at a Great White concert perished) being the most poignant. While Klosterman is often self-deprecating and loves to express his joy for the minutiae of pop culture existence he achieves a higher level when discussing the victims of the fire.

When encountering a relative of one of the victim's Klosterman reminisces on the fact that the following day so many people at his job (he's a writer for SPIN magazine) found it hard to reference the tragedy without feeling the need to make some sort of wisecrack about the quality of Great White as a band and the type of people that would be at a Great White show on a weeknight.

From the relative Klosterman finds out that the victim wasn't even a particular Great White fan, just a regular working class guy looking to have a beer and unwind after a long day of work. Klosterman's take on the holier than thou coolness of some of those that worship at the altar of pop-culture and how they reflect on where a middle class guy chose to go for a beer one tragic night is almost transcendent.

The rest of the ride is a little bit more uneven -- but then particular levels of fame of the people he is covering are also quite uneven. and perhaps thats a point I missed.

Overall a very good read, Klosterman's wit will win over most but its when his heart shows that he's at his best, I wish he would show it just a little more.
Eigonn
LOVE this book! The author is amazing and very funny. The book itself is informative, humorous and exciting. Have bought several copies over the years to give as gifts to friends who are interested in music.